Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com

Bittering Flavor

Would there be a significant difference in the flavor profile if I used Willamette over Santiam, or Perle keeping the IBU addition the same?

My understanding was that the bittering addition (60 min +) stripped the hops of their flavor, and that one hop was as good as another.

I had designed a hop schedule for a beer wanting to have a nice noble-like taste such as Boston Lager, though more pronounced, and had decided to use Willamette (4.7%) as the bittering so as to keep the Santiam and Perle for flavoring/aroma. But I was told I’d be better served by using the Willamette just for aroma and splitting the other two between bittering and flavoring.

I usually like the blend the various hops I used throughout my additions unless I’m using Warrior for bittering only, though I’ve never tried it any other way.

Just going from gut here but I think its more accurate to say that its much more difficult for our palettes to distinguish between different types of bittering but to say they are all the same would not be true. There are still subtle differences in flavors of bittering hops.

Think of it like this:

Put a turkey burger on the grill and a hamburger on the grill and leave them on there for 2 hours. They will taste pretty similar when done but chances are you’ll be able to tell subtle differences (if you can stomach putting them in your mouth) :slight_smile:

I am going through my old hops trying to use them before they’re bad as some I’ve had over a year (freezer stored in original bags).

I have settled on using 2 oz of Willamette (4.7%), and 1 oz of Santiam (7.2%) and Perle (8.9%). I had used the Willamette for bittering mostly and saved the others for their flavor (I’ve never used them).

But I was told I should move the Willamette to only aroma if I wanted a more noble flavor such as what Boston Lager has.

This is a 6gal 6.3% “amber.”

Oh, and I’m know for smoking my burgers (low heat) upwards of 2 hrs with a mix of mesquite and hickory! Mmmmm!

Known as Bob’s Bad*ss Backyard Burgers.

I never really thought of Willamette as a noble hop but it does seem like it might be pretty tasty as a later addition in an amber lager.

[quote=“rodwha”]I am going through my old hops trying to use them before they’re bad as some I’ve had over a year (freezer stored in original bags).

I have settled on using 2 oz of Willamette (4.7%), and 1 oz of Santiam (7.2%) and Perle (8.9%). I had used the Willamette for bittering mostly and saved the others for their flavor (I’ve never used them).

But I was told I should move the Willamette to only aroma if I wanted a more noble flavor such as what Boston Lager has.

This is a 6gal 6.3% “amber.”[/quote]

Willamette comes from Fuggles and is nothing like a noble hop.

Be careful of being too frugal. I had some old hops I was trying to use up, too, rather than just tossing them. I ended up tossing the 2 batches of beer I used them in. I should have just thrown out the hops. Smell them carefully and if they smell off at all then don’t risk it.

If they are old/stale it’ll be noticeable, right?

I have old Liberty I was warned about that I’ll be using in a hoppy honey wheat.

If this were fairly malty (6.3%) and using Santiam and Perle for flavoring and aroma would it clash using Willamette for bittering?

I also have some old Mt Hood (Nov/Dec '12).

Since Liberty doesn’t seem to do well I’ll begin with the wheat beer to see how those fair. If not I’ll see about the Willamette instead. And if that also doesn’t work I’ll check the Mt Hood.

How long will frozen properly packaged hops generally last? I’m assuming the package has been nitrogen flushed, but I don’t know that.

Now this may be totally bogus, but for me, I usually use my highest AA% as the bittering and lowest AA for aroma.
So, I would use the Perle for bittering, then 1oz of the Williamette at 20 and 1 oz at 5.
To me, that would be a good schedule for an English mild, brown or bitter.
I’ve never used Santium, so have no guess with those.
I guess it depends on what flavor profile you’re going for. Malty English style amber, or more hoppy American style.
And hops in original package stored in the freezer should be good for longer than a year.

[quote=“rodwha”]If they are old/stale it’ll be noticeable, right?

I have old Liberty I was warned about that I’ll be using in a hoppy honey wheat.[/quote]

They’ll smell like cheese or dirty feet.

Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com