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Biofine vs. Cold Crashing

I’ve got a batch of the Plinian Legacy in my secondary, which I’ll be bottling in a couple of days (on Saturday to be exact). I just added the second dry hop addition yesterday, and there is a nice 1" thick layer of hop trub floating on the top of the batch. To ensure that I don’t siphon any of this into my bottling bucket, should I:

A.) Cold crash it tonight until bottling day

B.) Add some Biofine two days before

C.) Both A and B

Any thoughts are always appreciated. Thanks!

At least cold crash it, that will drop all the hop material to the bottom. If you want the beer a bit extra clear you can do the biofine, gelatin, isinglass or what ever.

Thanks for the tip, I’ll probably do both just to see how it turns out.

On a more general note, are there any particular styles with which Biofine should always be used, and is Biofine the best option for getting good clarity? I know a lot of people use Irish Moss/Whirlfloc during the last 10 minutes of the boil, and others use gel finings and other agents at various stages of fermentation, but seeing as how I’ve never used any clarifying agents as of yet, I’m not sure what the best procedure/product would be.

[quote=“S Wagner”]I’ve got a batch of the Plinian Legacy in my secondary, which I’ll be bottling in a couple of days (on Saturday to be exact). I just added the second dry hop addition yesterday, and there is a nice 1" thick layer of hop trub floating on the top of the batch. To ensure that I don’t siphon any of this into my bottling bucket, should I:

A.) Cold crash it tonight until bottling day

B.) Add some Biofine two days before

C.) Both A and B

Any thoughts are always appreciated. Thanks![/quote]

you would rack underneath it, they will drop just not sure how long you plan on dry hopping.
Rack with a mesh bag over the siphon

Not really one best way. For any beer I want clear I use whirlfloc and then may use something additional like biofine or gelatin in the keg but those often aren’t needed if you leave the beer cold. Cold and time will clear just about anything, the other finings can just help things along.

Thank you for the feedback! One more quick follow-up question; I’ve noticed a lot of people that use Biofine also keg their beer. I’ll be bottling mine, will there be any issue with carbonation? In other words, will there be enough yeast still in suspension to properly bottle condition my beer, or is Biofine best used for batches that will be force-carbed in the keg?

Why would cold crashing cause floating hops to sink? Just curious.

I thought Biofine was a protease, as in chews up the stuff that causes chill haze. Or is that something else?

Sorry I was thinking of Clarity Ferm.

I don’t know the reason, but I can say it works. Takes longer with leaf than with pellets.

To the OP: I’m not familiar with Biofine, but unless you are VERY aggressing with finings, it shouldn’t pull out so much yeast that it won’t carbonate. If you are worried about that, add a teaspoon of dry yeast to the bottling bucket.

Also, an earlier comment was right: time will clear beer unless there is something very wrong with it. I use Irish Moss in the kettle, but I haven’t used any other finings for years and my beers pour crystal clear.

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