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Beer infection question

I made a Belgian triple the other day, and due to high gravity, I decided to buy a vinyl tube for a blow off instead of an air lock. I failed to sanitize the inside of the tube. I had both ends in a bucket of star san, but never filled the tube. My question is what are the signs and symptoms of an infected beer? Can you tell by looking at the beer? Is there a funky smell? How long does it take for an infection to develop? Now I’m worried that three minutes of carelessness will trash this beer. I see some foam made its way into the tube,but receded back into the carboy. What is the best time and way to check for an infection.

There are several types of infection (Rod bacteria, cocci, wild yeast…). Some take longer to develop than others. The easiest to see, is if your beer starts to mold. Or if it gets a greesy or powdery film called a pellicle (search google).

I think your beer will be fine. When it is time to bottle, taste and smell the beer. If it taste sour, it’s probably infected. If it taste like vinegar its infected. If it smells of vomit or anything really gross, it’s probably infected. The best way to spot an infection is to plate out some samples and use a microscope.

Like I said. Your beer is probably fine. You’re probably just paranoid, happens to me all the time. Wait until its time to package, take a sample, and decide then

[quote=“S.Scoggin”]There are several types of infection (Rod bacteria, cocci, wild yeast…). Some take longer to develop than others. The easiest to see, is if your beer starts to mold. Or if it gets a greesy or powdery film called a pellicle (search google).

I think your beer will be fine. When it is time to bottle, taste and smell the beer. If it taste sour, it’s probably infected. If it taste like vinegar its infected. If it smells of vomit or anything really gross, it’s probably infected. The best way to spot an infection is to plate out some samples and use a microscope.

Like I said. Your beer is probably fine. You’re probably just paranoid, happens to me all the time. Wait until its time to package, take a sample, and decide then[/quote]

+1. The only other question I would have is how much yeast did you pitch. If yeast start growing like mad, they will crowd out most bugs/fungi that could grow. Tripel? If your gravity was north of 70-80 and you pitched a decent starter or a few vials, I would surmise that those yeast are winning any battles for real estate inside that fermenter.

[quote=“Pietro”][quote=“S.Scoggin”]There are several types of infection (Rod bacteria, cocci, wild yeast…). Some take longer to develop than others. The easiest to see, is if your beer starts to mold. Or if it gets a greesy or powdery film called a pellicle (search google).

I think your beer will be fine. When it is time to bottle, taste and smell the beer. If it taste sour, it’s probably infected. If it taste like vinegar its infected. If it smells of vomit or anything really gross, it’s probably infected. The best way to spot an infection is to plate out some samples and use a microscope.

Like I said. Your beer is probably fine. You’re probably just paranoid, happens to me all the time. Wait until its time to package, take a sample, and decide then[/quote]

+1. The only other question I would have is how much yeast did you pitch. If yeast start growing like mad, they will crowd out most bugs/fungi that could grow. Tripel? If your gravity was north of 70-80 and you pitched a decent starter or a few vials, I would surmise that those yeast are winning any battles for real estate inside that fermenter.[/quote]

The rogue yeast can hang out and eat the sugars the brewer’s yeast were not able to use. Thus spoiling the batch.

I’m going with your beer will be fine. Time will tell.

One of my biggest snafus turned into one of my best beers. A sure thing or two turned out to be crap. Go figure.

Think positive and your beer will probably be fine.

Not sure about my pitching rate for the yeast starter. What I did was made a starter with 1700ml of water using 1.25 cup of DME. I had it on the stir plate for three days. I had an O.G. reading of 1.070 at 65 degrees. I am planning on keeping it in the primary for three weeks, debating with racking into a secondary or just racking it into the keg and applying the CO2. I am going to let it sit for four to six months to condition. That might be tough to do.
Thank you all who responded to my question. I hope all will be OK with this beer.

:cheers:

You’ll be fine. Brand new tubing is unlikely to be harboring anything nasty.

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