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All you heady topper fans

[quote=“grainbelt”][quote=“GarretD”]This is my table just yesterday :slight_smile:

[/quote]

that’s a whole bowl full nasty cloying beer. :cheers: [/quote]
I had to look up cloying :oops:

It’s dorks like the person who took OP’s photo that make Heady such a difficult beer to find. Must we all horde it for the sake of Facebook pictures to appease people who shouldn’t give a shit? I bought a case of HT once, I was sick of it by the eighth can.

ha yep, beer adovcate douchers, buy way to much shit, spend hundreds and hundreds of dollars on beer, age to much shit to long past its prime, hyped shit, etc…

[attachment=0]cs.jpg[/attachment]Since we’re showing off figured I would chime in. Was lucky to get this one in right before Cascade stop shipping.

Heady is such a difficult beer to find because of the limited distribution not because of how much people buy / horde. There is a 2 case limit in most places that sell Heady in VT. Nothing wrong with stocking up when and if you ever get a chance to buy some.

I can’t understand why home brewers would stock up on someone else’s brew. A taste of what’s out there sure but if your own is not the best beer why bother brewing.

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Heady is such a difficult beer to find because of the limited distribution not because of how much people buy / horde. There is a 2 case limit in most places that sell Heady in VT. Nothing wrong with stocking up when and if you ever get a chance to buy some.[/quote]

no its the stocking up and reselling and the dumbasses that pay it to the person who is reselling. And yes a lot of locals hoard it when it is readily available.

No idea…its all beer and meant to be shared and enjoyed be it commercial or homebrew.

I agree. Not to boast, but I think some of the best beer I’ve ever had has come from my garage. I rarely buy commercial, but when I do, it’s to share and enjoy with family and friends. Don’t get me wrong though, I do cellar beers :slight_smile:

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Wait…So your beer is as good as commercial beer?

I buy commercial beer because I know I will never be able to brew at that level without spending thousands and thousands of dollars on equipment. I have yet to meet anyone who can.

If you believe your beer is as good as or better than commercial and just have a small regular set up, meaning a pot, using buckets/carboy to ferm, no ferm chamber, no 3 tier system…etc.etc.etc…(less than $500 into it) please PM me and I will send you my address so you can send me a sample of your beer and I will be the judge.

I know certain people only drink their own, but that is like 1 in 50. It’s also not because their beer is as good as commercial.

I hate to get on my high horse, but I hate it when people act like everyone can just brew the best beer in the world with a setup costing only a few hundred bucks. I will be the first one to say hell yes I would not buy commercial if I could brew it as good as they can, just has not happened yet.

Wait…So your beer is as good as commercial beer?

I buy commercial beer because I know I will never be able to brew at that level without spending thousands and thousands of dollars on equipment. I have yet to meet anyone who can.

If you believe your beer is as good as or better than commercial and just have a small regular set up, meaning a pot, using buckets/carboy to ferm, no ferm chamber, no 3 tier system…etc.etc.etc…(less than $500 into it) please PM me and I will send you my address so you can send me a sample of your beer and I will be the judge.

I know certain people only drink their own, but that is like 1 in 50. It’s also not because their beer is as good as commercial.

I hate to get on my high horse, but I hate it when people act like everyone can just brew the best beer in the world with a setup costing only a few hundred bucks. I will be the first one to say hell yes I would not buy commercial if I could brew it as good as they can, just has not happened yet.[/quote]

I am partially with you…You can brew good if not better than commercial beer with a homebrew setup, you do not need thousands of dollars of equipment, thats been proven over and over.
That being said there are tons of crappy commercial brewers and some awesome commercial brewers (sadly more crappy, especially with the boom over the past few years). If someone thinks they can keep up with the awesome brewers out there they are usually kidding themselves, or just don’t have the palate to tell the difference.

Not enough homebrewers do blind tastings and let the beer speak for itself not the hype

1 Like

Wait…So your beer is as good as commercial beer?

I buy commercial beer because I know I will never be able to brew at that level without spending thousands and thousands of dollars on equipment. I have yet to meet anyone who can.

If you believe your beer is as good as or better than commercial and just have a small regular set up, meaning a pot, using buckets/carboy to ferm, no ferm chamber, no 3 tier system…etc.etc.etc…(less than $500 into it) please PM me and I will send you my address so you can send me a sample of your beer and I will be the judge.

I know certain people only drink their own, but that is like 1 in 50. It’s also not because their beer is as good as commercial.

I hate to get on my high horse, but I hate it when people act like everyone can just brew the best beer in the world with a setup costing only a few hundred bucks. I will be the first one to say hell yes I would not buy commercial if I could brew it as good as they can, just has not happened yet.[/quote]

I have had a couple commercial examples of vienna lager that i felt were worse than mine. I sampled them alongside my homebrew and mine was preferred by myself and others. I’ve only been brewing for a year so I actually surprised myself.

That being said, I have never made an IPA (and I’ve brewed like 10) that are even CLOSE to any commercial examples that I enjoy. I will keep trying though. In the meantime I’ll just drink me some Fat Heads Head Hunter and Stone Ruination that I buy from the grocery store :slight_smile:

[quote]
I have had a couple commercial examples of vienna lager that i felt were worse than mine. I sampled them alongside my homebrew and mine was preferred by myself and others. I’ve only been brewing for a year so I actually surprised myself.

That being said, I have never made an IPA (and I’ve brewed like 10) that are even CLOSE to any commercial examples that I enjoy. I will keep trying though. In the meantime I’ll just drink me some Fat Heads Head Hunter and Stone Ruination that I buy from the grocery store :slight_smile: [/quote]

that is also personel preference and if people know what a vienna lager should taste like and trained palates
Or friends not telling you what they think of your beer. (not saying it was bad)

2 words for everything BLIND TASTINGS

[quote=“grainbelt”][quote]
I have had a couple commercial examples of vienna lager that i felt were worse than mine. I sampled them alongside my homebrew and mine was preferred by myself and others. I’ve only been brewing for a year so I actually surprised myself.

That being said, I have never made an IPA (and I’ve brewed like 10) that are even CLOSE to any commercial examples that I enjoy. I will keep trying though. In the meantime I’ll just drink me some Fat Heads Head Hunter and Stone Ruination that I buy from the grocery store :slight_smile: [/quote]

that is also personel preference and if people know what a vienna lager should taste like and trained palates
Or friends not telling you what they think of your beer. (not saying it was bad)

2 words for everything BLIND TASTINGS[/quote]

Yeah I agree there could be personal bias involved. But in this case I did do a blind tasting. Admittedly they don’t have the most refined palettes in the world but they did prefer mine without knowing it was mine. Granted, none of them knew what a vienna lager is “supposed” to taste like according to BJCP but when it comes down to it, its all about enjoying a beverage. I’ll leave the style guidelines to the judges.

Wait…So your beer is as good as commercial beer?

I buy commercial beer because I know I will never be able to brew at that level without spending thousands and thousands of dollars on equipment. I have yet to meet anyone who can.

If you believe your beer is as good as or better than commercial and just have a small regular set up, meaning a pot, using buckets/carboy to ferm, no ferm chamber, no 3 tier system…etc.etc.etc…(less than $500 into it) please PM me and I will send you my address so you can send me a sample of your beer and I will be the judge.

I know certain people only drink their own, but that is like 1 in 50. It’s also not because their beer is as good as commercial.

I hate to get on my high horse, but I hate it when people act like everyone can just brew the best beer in the world with a setup costing only a few hundred bucks. I will be the first one to say hell yes I would not buy commercial if I could brew it as good as they can, just has not happened yet.[/quote]

I am partially with you…You can brew good if not better than commercial beer with a homebrew setup, you do not need thousands of dollars of equipment, thats been proven over and over.
That being said there are tons of crappy commercial brewers and some awesome commercial brewers (sadly more crappy, especially with the boom over the past few years). If someone thinks they can keep up with the awesome brewers out there they are usually kidding themselves, or just don’t have the palate to tell the difference.

Not enough homebrewers do blind tastings and let the beer speak for itself not the hype[/quote]

I would somewhat agree as well…IPA’s seem to be the hardest and I guess that is where I was coming from, but if someone has beers as good as BC, Darkness…etc.etc…send me the steps and recipes. Another thing I was saying is you cannot just brew beers, set them in the basement and it’s awesome…it just done not happen.

[quote]
I would somewhat agree as well…IPA’s seem to be the hardest and I guess that is where I was coming from, but if someone has beers as good as BC, Darkness…etc.etc…send me the steps and recipes. Another thing I was saying is you cannot just brew beers, set them in the basement and it’s awesome…it just done not happen.[/quote]

True There are steps and skills involved but a hombrewer can make outstanding beer, easily to.
IPA’s took some time but I prefer making IPA over commercial IPA now as they are just so much better fresh and I can get the hop character I want, to many commercial beer have oxidized hops and hops fading, it took a lot of brewing to get it down to get them where I want them, still do not have it down pat but very close. Water plays a big roll.

Ha, I was waiting for Darkness to pop in the conversation, one of the most over rated beers IMO. Cloying mess IMO. All hype.
I hate underattenuated beers, that and DL…etc way to sweet. I took gravity reading of a darkness after letting it degas to get FG and don’t have the exact numbers but it was around 1.046-1.050! I know dark lord is in that region to. Thats around 1.135 OG for the alchohol content they are.
Drink them blind next to some big Attenuated stouts

It bothers me when people THINK they need thousands of dollars worth of equipment to make beer as good as commercial beer!

As far as steps/recipes, read (and understand and practice) the usual suspects of brewing. (How to Brew, Brewing Classic Styles Water, Yeast, Designing Great Beers, Farmhouse Ales, Hops). I would say every one of Jamil’s recipes, if brewed right in BCS can go toe-to-toe with mid range commercial craft beer. Yes, including Surly. Fermentation temperature control. Yeast management. Wort production is so far down the line. If you are making 5 gallon batches, you don’t need a lot of equipment. Larger and commercial breweries spend a lot of money to increase production size and achieve consistency. Homebrewers can get consistent on some pretty jerry-rigged systems (and I have tasted the consistency of their beer, which has been great) for the very reason that their batches are small and one can manipulate them without a forklift or a crane.

I would say (and others have said, including judges and competitions) that my beer can go toe-to-toe with the majority of the craft beer out there. You can make as good of a beer as Surly Darkness. Better actually. If your goal isn’t to make beer that good, and you aren’t improving on each batch to get closer to that, whats the point? Just to say “I made this” and watch your friends be polite and choke it down? My goal is to make excellent beer on each batch. Not homebrew. Beer. And beer the way I want it. Not beer that a marketer (that includes Sam Calagione) tells me I want. Hype is huge. I personally think 120 is ok, not nearly worth the price or hype. But some people can’t get it. So they want it. Cabbage Patch Kids. Super Soakers. Air Jordans. Heady Topper. Nothing new. The only difference is now they Instagram, Tweet and Facebrag about it.

Oh and also, re: cellaring: my 2.5 year old biere de garde is probably the best beer I’ve ever had.

There is a 2 4-pack limit on most places that sell Heady.

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[quote=“Pietro”]It bothers me when people THINK they need thousands of dollars worth of equipment to make beer as good as commercial beer!

As far as steps/recipes, read (and understand and practice) the usual suspects of brewing. (How to Brew, Water, Yeast, Designing Great Beers, Farmhouse Ales, Hops). Fermentation temperature control. Yeast management. Wort production is so far down the line. If you are making 5 gallon batches, you don’t need a lot of equipment. Larger and commercial breweries spend a lot of money to increase production size and achieve consistency. Homebrewers can get consistent on some pretty jerry-rigged systems (and I have tasted the consistency of their beer, which has been great) for the very reason that their batches are small and one can manipulate them without a forklift or a crane.

Oh and also, re: cellaring: my 2.5 year old biere de garde is probably the best beer I’ve ever had.

There is a 2 4-pack limit on most places that sell Heady.[/quote]

yes other things are just as important but wort production is a crucial step to making good beer. If you cant produce good wort all the other fancy steps is not going to make your beer good
I do a wort stability test on every batch I make, just to keep my sanitation in check.

Commercial breweries do it differently than homebrewers to achieve consistency.
Ever heard double your fermenters capacity in the pro world?
Fermenters are usually double, sometimes triple or quadruple the size of the boil kettle so they are able to keep it consistent, and tweak subsequent batches if things are off. They brew 2, 3 or 4 times to fill a fermenter

[quote=“grainbelt”][

yes other things are just as important but wort production is a crucial step to making good beer. If you cant produce good wort all the other fancy steps is not going to make your beer good
I do a wort stability test on every batch I make, just to keep my sanitation in check.

Commercial breweries do it differently than homebrewers to achieve consistency.
Ever heard double your fermenters capacity in the pro world?
Fermenters are usually double, sometimes triple or quadruple the size of the boil kettle so they are able to keep it consistent, and tweak subsequent batches if things are off. They brew 2, 3 or 4 times to fill a fermenter[/quote]

I’m not sure I understand the meaning of the second paragraph. I understand as one scales up, one needs to manage things differently, but that has essentially nothing to do with the point I am making.

As far as wort production, yes you do need to make good wort to make good beer. But you can make GREAT wort and have no fermentation temp control and low pitch rates and make miserable beer. If you steep some grains for an hour, and really dial in ferment and pitch rate, you will have very good, if not great beer.

1 Like

[quote=“Pietro”][quote=“grainbelt”][

yes other things are just as important but wort production is a crucial step to making good beer. If you cant produce good wort all the other fancy steps is not going to make your beer good
I do a wort stability test on every batch I make, just to keep my sanitation in check.

Commercial breweries do it differently than homebrewers to achieve consistency.
Ever heard double your fermenters capacity in the pro world?
Fermenters are usually double, sometimes triple or quadruple the size of the boil kettle so they are able to keep it consistent, and tweak subsequent batches if things are off. They brew 2, 3 or 4 times to fill a fermenter[/quote]

I’m not sure I understand the meaning of the second paragraph. I understand as one scales up, one needs to manage things differently, but that has essentially nothing to do with the point I am making.

As far as wort production, yes you do need to make good wort to make good beer. But you can make GREAT wort and have no fermentation temp control and low pitch rates and make miserable beer. If you steep some grains for an hour, and really dial in ferment and pitch rate, you will have very good, if not great beer.[/quote]

COnsistency is achieved much easier that way. (2 paragraph)

wort production…Poor wort and good process (ferm tep, pitch rate etc) does not equal good beer

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