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220 volt vs 240 volt

One of my plans this year. Going electric. So build or buy new system. One of the thing i look at. Biab 20 gal brew system. Clawhammer brewing has a system i do like. Means got to build a hoist system as well. But my question. The electric control panel. And heathing element. Are 240 volt. Here on island they have. 110 volt or 220 volt. I got both. But does the panel and element run on 220 volt.

I often have this question and just go for it anyway and the 240 always works. How many phases is the Clawhammer?

You have 2- 110 legs… Of power… I’m not smart enough to tell you it’s 2 phase… Which I believe it is… That makes 220… I should work. BUT I’d have that conversation before buying…
Damn, is it Aburn instruments that has it all… Pre-built stuff or build your own… That’s where I got the guts to build my controller… Did I say it was quite economical? It’s back on my electric kettle buildup in the brew gear section…
You’ll be soooooo happy you made the switch! Aubins.com I believe…
Need input, let me know!
Sneezles61

Be careful Wilco. There is more to it than 220 vs 240. The US has a 110/220 (or 120/240) volt alternating current (AC) split phase system at a frequency of 60 Hz. Based on some quick searching, it appears that Bonaire has two systems, 127 volt single phase and 220 volt single phase, both AC and both at 50 Hz.

Using equipment designed for 60 Hz at 50 Hz has a few implications depending on the specific equipment. Some motors will run 17% slower. Some equipment will draw 17% more current causing it to run hotter than designed which leads to early failure.

The split phase (aka 3 wire single phase) system in the US provides 220 (or 240) volts between the two “hot” wires and 110 (120) volts between each of those and the third “neutral” wire. That allows a 220 volt appliance to also use 110 volts. For example, an electric stove might use 220v for the heating elements but also use 110v for the control system, oven light, etc. A 240V electric brew system might be wired internally to do something similar. Your 220v single phase system can not support that.

And then there are maximum current draws to consider. Higher current requires larger wires.

I’m not saying you can’t use any particular electric brew system, I’m only suggesting that you need to look into it much more than 220 vs 240 volts.

I should also mention “230” - some countries use a split phase 230/460 volt system similar to the US 110/220 v approach. There is also 208V three phase in the US and 230V three phase in some other countries - 3 phase is not compatible with single phase.

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Thanks for the info. Very clear. This is one of mine concerns. Buying a system. In the usa. With different power. Supply. Indeed. Bonaire using. 110 volt. 60 hz. I got 220 volt as well. My kegurator runs 220. It runs way more stabel. Than other 110volt. Machines. Will do more research. On power. But this way very clear to read

Spoke to a electrician yesterday. Cost me few home brews. For his info. He said. If ya wanna do this. Do some research. On european. Electric. Brew products. He will help me build. One thing he said. He would love to build. The electric. Contoller box. What controls. Pumps. Temp control. And so on . why not he has. A electrical store Sells Everything Electric Wise.

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Did some more research on system. What ya need a wire 30 amps power outlet. Receptacle with cfci protection. What ever that is ??? As well says. System usa only. Will not work outside usa

The GFCI is a “ground Fault Circuit Interrupter”… meaning… If some how, the voltage tried to “leak” over to the kettle or such, it will notice and kill the circuit… Protecting you from electrocution… Very valuable piece of equipment when water is involved…
Yes, there has to be an European outfit similar to Aubins.com… I’ll bet there are peeps on the same parallel as us tinkering with gizmos!! I’ll be waiting to see what your research shows up… And just for fun, I took a couple years, casually, looking for parts and such…
Sneezles61

So am I understanding…
American 220, just call it … Red=hot… Black =hot… Neutral =ground/neutral… Is called 3 phase?
Sneezles61

I think that’s single phase/split phase. I’ve never understood three phase-don’t think it’s used much or at all in residential situations.

Ron

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It has something to do with sign wave… Or magnetism or… :roll_eyes:
Magic!!!
Good to see your back again… You’ve been… Aloof. :grimacing:

Sneezles61

You are correct. Not much need for three phase in a residential setting. Three phase is basically three separate electric services. A/C just like the name alternates making the sine wave pass through zero so at that moment, no power. With three phase there are three separate at different phase angles so at no time is the power at zero. This works well for things like large electric motors.

Someone more familiar with this or that took basic electricity/electronics less than 20 years ago may be able to elaborate or correct me if I’m not explaining this right.

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frenchie’s got it. That’s split single phase, aka 3 wire single phase. That’s the typical residential power in the US. 3 phase is more for industrial applications. I only mentioned it because we are talking about voltage in the 220 to 240 range and there is 208 and 230 three phase.

Look up center tap transformers for an explanation of the split single phase.

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Perhaps that explains the 208 voltage in many of the older schools and offices I’ve worked in remodeling… Them damn lights really stung!
Sneezles61

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I asked our electrician at work “Is that line 220?” “Let me find out,” he responded, touching the live wires. “Yup, its 220.”

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I deal with a lot of 3 phase at work. Yes there is and extra wire and it tends to run a little more efficiently for larger scale equipment which is why it is sort of standard with motors working longer hours under heavier loads.

I wonder if 3 phase still needs a start cap?
Sneezles61

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