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1056 vs. 1272

I have the Sierra Madre kit and ingredients for a Irish type stout on the way. I also have both 1056 (American Ale I) and 1272 (American Ale II) activator packs on the way. I was thinking about using the 1272 for the stout. Has anybody used 1272 for a stout? I have never used the 1272 at all, so if you have used it in an IPA I would appreciate your comments there too.

Here is the stout recipe:
7 lbs 2-row
1 lbs flaked barley
1 lbs Cara
1 lbs roasted barley
1/2 lbs chocolate
hops change all the time, prob go with EKG 1 oz @ 60 minutes

1272 is my preferred liquid yeast for all American ales. When I’m feeling lazy or brewing off-schedule, I’ll use US-05 instead - both make great beer.

1272 is my house yeast. I use it for almost all IPA’s and APA’s… and some others. Very good reliable yeast.

Another vote for 1272. Nice fruity esters that aren’t overwhelming and very reliable. I’ve used it in stouts, porters, ambers, ipas… You might get the idea that I like it :smiley:

Well, I am thinking I’ll try the 1272 in the stout and the 1056 in the IPA.

does anyone have extensive experience with the 1272? if so, do you know at what temperatures bring out the best esters for an apa and ipa . i have been getting a high estery profile with this yeast fermenting at ambient 68 to 70. almost undesirable so i assume i just need to go lower with it but how low is too low and eliminates the esters that you are wanting in the yeast?

Typically I’ll pitch 1272 (standard pitching rate - i.e. two packs for a 1.050ish beer) at and let it free-rise to 68°F, hold it there for the first 48 hours or so, then let it free-rise to 72°F. Pitching temperature I adjust based on the desired ester profile, from 59°F for a very clean Chico-like finish to 66°F in something I want to be especially estery, like a porter.

If you’re pitching at 68-70°F and letting it free-rise, you’re probably reaching high krausen in the upper 70s, and I’d expect very intense ester production - especially if you’re also under-pitching.

wyeast prescribed .5 liter of yeast per barrel so that is what we pitch into typically 1.054 wort but the brewery is at a constant 68 ambient so i am assuming we may be getting into the high 70s like you mention. turned the brewery down to 62 tonight so we will see how the next few batches taste, hopefully better.

Another vote for 1272, this is my house yeast also. I used to use 1056 or US05 and still do on occasion but like the way 1272 flocculates better. For a clean profile ferment at 60-62* or even lower,for more British character 64-66*.Then raise to 68-70* at the end of fermentation to finish up and clean up. If you ferment cool be sure to use plenty of yeast. Also if you have not already put a stick -on thermometer strip on the fermenter and go by it. The beer is fermenting several degrees warmer than ambient temps are, try to keep it under 68* until the last part of ferment.

If that’s 500 mL of clean, fresh slurry then you’re actually over-pitching by quite a bit.

How tall are your fermenters? I assumed we were talking about homebrew-scale fermentations. Temperatures in a large tank will be totally different.

I recently brewed my lemon rosemary blonde ale using 1272. My fermentation area is in the low 60s this time of year. I cracked one open yesterday and was real happy with the clean ferment.

went with 1056 for the stout and I ended up with 89% eff and a OG of 10.056 (not sure what was different). I am usually around 78%. Anyway after a week I’m at only 1.022. Temps were great, low around 68 and high around 71. I think I’ll pitch some Nottingham? Thoughts? I have yet to have a fermentation stall in five years. THe APA, with 1272, is moving along great 1.051 to 1.012.

No yeast is hungrier or more reliable than 1056 (except maybe 3711). Pitching Nottingham will do nothing. Try giving the fermenter a little shake.

I’m interested in this too, as I like the idea of 1272 fermenting clean at 59-60 but then getting estery when I’d want it to at 66-68 or so… I’ve heard this strain doesn’t attenuate as well, but I’m thinking this could be compensated for with the addition of dextrose to the grist. Any idea on what percentage would help? I’m thinking 4-6% maybe?

I just did a blonde ale with 1272 at lower 60s and had it drop from 1.051 to 1.009 which looks like 82% to me.

@Skyler
“No yeast is hungrier or more reliable than 1056 (except maybe 3711). Pitching Nottingham will do nothing. Try giving the fermenter a little shake.”

I transferred it to a secondary fermenter and there is not action two days later. Thoughts?

“How tall are your fermenters? I assumed we were talking about homebrew-scale fermentations. Temperatures in a large tank will be totally different.”

The fermentors are just plain plastic 60 gallon drums i think, about waist high.

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