Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com

Looking for a Less Aggressive IPA

[quote=“Nighthawk”]You should list the beers that you have tried and didn’t like. Personally, I think the beers mentioned would be on your list.

You may be more interested in the American Pale Ale instead of the IPA. Though the lines do get blurry. SNPA has won awards in both the APA and IPA categories.

I find Summit IPA to be tasty but not a knock your shocks off beer. Or is it Summit Pale Ale. :oops:

edit: it’s Extra Pale Ale.[/quote]
Just though I’d report back on my adventures in this style since originally posting. I’ve found that I do like Summit’s EPA and Ranger’s IPA, but wanted to thank Nighthawk for the suggestion of looking into APA’s. I just tasted an early sample of an APA I brewed from Brewing Classic Styles and have to say that I thought it was fantastic and am really looking forward to drinking it. Just the right balance of hop flavor and aroma for my palate.

[quote=“GarretD”]Odell IPA…One of my favorite IPA’s.

"We took the traditional IPA, originally shipped from England to India in the 1700′s, and made it bolder and more flavorful – American Style. We’ve added new varieties of highly aromatic American hops to create a distinctive bitterness profile and an incredible hop character.

7.0%Alc. by Vol 60IBUs"[/quote]

While this is hands down one of my favorite IPAs I wouldn’t put it in the “less aggressive” IPA category. Everyone should try it, but if you’re looking for something kinda dialed down I’d go with Bridgeport personally…

[quote=“Dan S”]Hello Everyone,

I am wondering if anyone out there could recommend a recipe (or commercial example to look into) for an IPA that skews toward the lower end of the hopping spectrum. [/quote]

As a fellow Minnesotan, try Fulton’s Sweet Child o’ Vine? It is sweeter (and for me, the appearance of hoppiness is less so) than the usual IPA.

On the homebrew front, you may also want to seek out northern brewer hops or chinook hops, as they will produce different hop aromas and flavors compared to the classic “C” hops.

[quote=“Hoppenheimer”][quote=“GarretD”]Odell IPA…One of my favorite IPA’s.

"We took the traditional IPA, originally shipped from England to India in the 1700′s, and made it bolder and more flavorful – American Style. We’ve added new varieties of highly aromatic American hops to create a distinctive bitterness profile and an incredible hop character.

7.0%Alc. by Vol 60IBUs"[/quote]

While this is hands down one of my favorite IPAs I wouldn’t put it in the “less aggressive” IPA category. Everyone should try it, but if you’re looking for something kinda dialed down I’d go with Bridgeport personally…[/quote]

I agree…one of the best…but I say it is less aggressive because I’m comparing it too Lagunitas :slight_smile:

it could be that I am so used to the Summit Sagas of the world but I think that would second the recommendation of the Mpls Local “Fulton Sweet Child of Vine” is on the milder and sweeter side. More of that Grapefruit Bubblegum flavor and less of the bitterness.

[quote=“Silentknyght”][quote=“Dan S”]Hello Everyone,

I am wondering if anyone out there could recommend a recipe (or commercial example to look into) for an IPA that skews toward the lower end of the hopping spectrum. [/quote]

As a fellow Minnesotan, try Fulton’s Sweet Child o’ Vine? It is sweeter (and for me, the appearance of hoppiness is less so) than the usual IPA.

On the homebrew front, you may also want to seek out northern brewer hops or chinook hops, as they will produce different hop aromas and flavors compared to the classic “C” hops.[/quote]
Thanks for all of the additional recommendations – Fulton’s Sweet Child o’ Vine will move to the top of the list!

Sounds like you just want a pale ale not an ipa?
Do an English IPA or just get away from the standard american C hops.
Fultons IPA is just not good IMO.
Go buy the IPA by Mitch Steele book it has a ton of history in it and recipes

Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com