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ESB Quest

I was a little impatient so I put the bottle in my shorts pocket for a while and popped the top. It does seem to let the flavors come out more a bit warmer. And it’s not so ho hum either as it does have some of that different flavor that I dig. It may not be as pronounced, but it’s in there. Thanks for the temp tip!

Is that an ESB in your pocket, or are you just happy to see me? :cheers:

[quote=“mattnaik”][quote=“rodwha”]
What I read about Special Roast is: “Gives a biscuit flavor to English Ales.”
[/quote]

In my limited experience with special roast (used 1/2lb in my last IPA), I got a very pronounced biscuit flavor from it. I LOVE the flavor of this beer and the special roast was definitely the star of the show as far as the malt goes. I did however notice a slightly “tangy” aroma (not sure if it was from the malt or not) before I dry-hopped it. 3 ounces of dry-hops took care of that :slight_smile: [/quote]

If I’m not too mistaken, Briess’s description on the packaging of their special roast malt describes it as having a sourdough bread aroma. I guess that’s what they’re talking about, huh? Sounds like you got what you paid for on that one.

Why, it’s an ESB! :mrgreen:

I was really surprised how much better it tasted warmed up a little.

:cheers:

Muntons is fine, I like the 40-80L range but experiment with different ones and it’s all good. The blend would work fine.

As for your warming method, a bit unconventional to say the least.

Yea, I meant to allow the bottle to sit out while I did stuff in the kitchen figuring it may give it 10 mins, but I forgot. So I set it on the counter a few minutes when it began taunting me! Seriously! So I stuck it in my pocket for a few more minutes. It worked well enough I guess… :wink:

About as bad as me putting liquid yeast pouches under my sweater. Impatience leads to invention too I guess.

[quote=“rodwha”]I was really surprised how much better it tasted warmed up a little.

:cheers: [/quote]

The Brits have had it right all along. While a lawnmower lager or a cream ale go down very nice and refreshing when served cold, a well made beer is (to me anyway) totally wasted if it is served practically frozen and not allowed to warm up a bit. For all the respect that “good” beer is now getting, it still gets a lot of disrespect at serving time

When I’m out for dinner or at a bar and I order a beer, it is almost always served too cold. Even SA Boston Lager is much, much tastier and more satisfying when it is served at around 50-55°F.

I used to need my Bud near frozen, and often put them in the freezer for a while before I’d drink them, especially if straight out of the fridge from a store. Now I generally drink craft beers from my fridge, which I believe is about 45*.

While out I’m often brought a mug that’s been chilled. I hate that and spend about 5-10 mins warming it up. The waiter often looks at me funny, and likely thinking it’s due to some sort of germaphobia, that I want to keep my glass.

Yeah its funny, I have a buddy who is an experienced winemaker and just getting into beer and he always offers me a frosty mug for a beer at his place. I haven’t had the heart to tell him this is a faux pas, yet.

[quote=“deliusism1”]
If I’m not too mistaken, Briess’s description on the packaging of their special roast malt describes it as having a sourdough bread aroma. I guess that’s what they’re talking about, huh? Sounds like you got what you paid for on that one.[/quote]

And, the expert has spoken. What’s with all the snarky comments? Anybody else getting tired of this guy?

So I’ve just used the brew store’s description, which doesn’t say anything about sourdough, so I looked up Briess’ description:

“Toasty,
biscuity,
sour dough,
tangy
Complex flavored Biscuit-style Malt.
With its characteristic and bold sourdough flavor, it will contribute an exciting layer of flavor to Nut Brown Ales, Porters and other dark beer styles.”

I’ve used it in a pumpkin ale, a Cascadian Dark, and an amber, and have never noticed any sourdough, but not much of a biscuity flavor either except for a hint in the amber.

I hadn’t taken his comment to be snarky. But I haven’t dealt with him much.

[quote=“El Capitan”][quote=“deliusism1”]
If I’m not too mistaken, Briess’s description on the packaging of their special roast malt describes it as having a sourdough bread aroma. I guess that’s what they’re talking about, huh? Sounds like you got what you paid for on that one.[/quote]

And, the expert has spoken. What’s with all the snarky comments? Anybody else getting tired of this guy?[/quote]

I couldn’t really tell if it was snarky or not. He is opinionated and convictional for sure. I still find his comments informative in most cases. There is another user which will remain unnamed at this time who adds nothing to the community other than criticizing other people who “supposedly” know less than him. Him I am tired of.

Sorry to derail the thread…

No biggie…

In traditional muzzleloader forums I find many with a condescending nature. If you don’t do thinks their way you shouldn’t be allowed to breathe. It’s funny that those same folks complain how their art is dying with fewer youngsters showing interest. I try to hold my tongue and absorb what good I can, but at times I end up telling them that a more positive accepting attitude, even if you don’t agree, sure would help their interests. Flies and honey/vinegar and such…

I like Left Hand’s Sawtooth.

Honestly, “sourdough” isn’t something I personally want in an ESB. I’m more in love with the biscuit/cracker/graham cracker from the marriage of Maris Otter and a little British crystal 40-80.

I didn’t read it as snarky either, just providing a different point of view. I’m pretty quick with the opinions too, and I assume you will understand they are worth at least what you paid for them.

I’ve not perceived a sourdough flavor, but maybe it has just been fairly complex and not so easy to detect, though it’s not as though I have a great trained palate either.

I REALLY enjoy the taste that Foster’s has given their example, which may be sacrilegious, but I do. Fuller’s is great too, as is Speckled Hen. I’ve only had maybe half a dozen examples.

I’m not thin skinned, and I generally don’t take things too personally. I just try to glean what I can and leave the rest for others to concern themselves with. Of course not always…

A good bitter was one of my holy grails, and I found that simple recipes yielded the best results. I got advice on another forum a few years back to go 80% English Pale Malt, 10% English Crystal, and 10% Sugar (demerara is nice) for the malt bill. Bingo. Ferment that well with the English ale yeast of your choice, paying close attention to fermentation temps, carb it pretty low, and you’re in business. It’s the greatest example I’ve seen of the simple elegance of a great ale.

I’ll say also that you could replace the sugar with more pale malt, but that the lighter body actually enhances drinkability at cellar temps, at least imo. Keeping the grain bill all malt helps a bit if you’re going to serve it cold.

This gets you a good English style ESB. I can’t speak much to American ESBs, other than that I love to drink Sawtooth Ale and other good American examples. I was after the English character, though, longing for the beers I’ve had across the pond.

Good advice all around elkdog. I used to include some sugar in my bitters but have left it out more recently. I may go back to it, since I have such fond memories of some of those early brews. Not that the recent ones have been lacking, although I’ve played with English pale malts other than Maris Otter (namely, Optic and Pearl) and haven’t found quite the same wonderful flavor.

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