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Yeast starter with dry yeast

I am reading the instructions for a yeast starter on the NB site.

http://www.northernbrewer.com/documenta ... tarter.pdf

It talks about using liquid yeast. Can you do this with dry yeast? I am going to make my first yeast starter in a few days and I am a little nervous about the process. I don’t feel like I have found much consistent information on the topic.

No, do not make a starter with dry yeast - there’s plenty of yeast in one packet for a five-gallon batch of 1.060 wort and if you need more cells, just open another packet.

But I recommend rehydrating yeast when using dry yeast. There is much debate on the issue, but rehydrating definitely allows the yeast to normalize its cell walls before jumping into action.

Rehydrate your yeast in accordance with Palmer’s suggestions - http://www.howtobrew.com/section1/chapter6-5.html

Don’t worry about making a starter. You should have plenty of yeast in a single packet. See, for instance, the Mr. Malty yeast calculator - http://www.mrmalty.com/calc/calc.html

Also, theres no need to aerate the wort when using dry yeast.

Hope this helps
http://www.danstaryeast.com/frequently-asked-questions

What are the thoughts behind this?

They’ve somehow fortified the yeast with the sterols they need for cell membrane growth, so there is no need for oxygen which is primarily to synthesize sterols. Something I only recently heard about and thought I’d throw in.

Interesting

I think it’s more abut the fact that there are so many cells in a pack of dry yeast that there’s little to no need for cell growth. Although Lennie is correct that the yeast is also coated with nutrients.

Hmm. Something to think about. I’ve been oxygenating my wort every time, whether it was dry or a starter. Guess I’ll save the oxygen for liquid starters.

It won’t hurt with dry yeast, but it won’t help as much either.

It won’t hurt with dry yeast, but it won’t help as much either.[/quote]

So, instead of oxygen you could just shake the carboy a bit? How about high gravity (over 1.100) beers?

It won’t hurt with dry yeast, but it won’t help as much either.[/quote]

So, instead of oxygen you could just shake the carboy a bit? How about high gravity (over 1.100) beers?[/quote]

I’m of the opinion that you should do anything you can to help a high OG beer along.

there was also some testing done on basic brewing radio on pitching dry yeast vs pitching after rehydrating. Pitching dry did kill almost half the cells but they also said they could not tell the difference on some of the beers it almost came down to certain beers they could tell. Interesting listen

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