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Yeast inactive?

Okay so I am a new brewer… This is my first ever batch and I am very excited to see how it turns out, well I was at first. Now I am beginning to get nervous as to whether it will turn out as I expected because my yeast is 1.)dead or 2.)just reacting late. I have read countless forums about brewers panicking because of this problem of fermentation not taking place while they think it should. However my situation is slightly different than any forums I’ve read so far. So, after I followed all the proper steps of making the wort and transferring it into a glass carboy, I pitched the DRY yeast with no activation before pitching. (Now lets pause… after reading all the forums I now realize how important it is to time the exact temperature of the wort before pitching the yeast. However, me being a noob, I just followed the vague directions in the box and it said to “pitch yeast when glass carboy is no longer warm to the touch…” :shock: so I did…) After I pitch the yeast I put an airlock on the carboy and lock it away in my nice dark cool closet to ferment… The next morning I wake up and hurry to my closet to see whats going on with my new hobby, and POW foam from fermentation has risen so far that it is coming through my airlock! But I knew this was a possibility so I didn’t panic. What I did was get my spare (sanitized) airlock and switch it with the one that was almost blown sky high. When I did this all seemed well, there were bubbles coming through the airlock at about 2 bubbles per second. (very violently) So I left the carboy in my closet and proceeded with my day. That night (about 24 hours after I first pitched the yeast) I checked the carboy and found no activity in the airlock (yes I know this means nothing) and not a sign of krausen on top of the beer. I don’t understand how my yeast went from being so violently active to no sign of being active at all. It is now around 42 hours after first pitching the yeast and it is still showing NO signs. I know temperature plays a major role with yeast so I went to buy a sticker thermometer today and placed it on the side of the carboy. It is reading 70 degrees. What should be my next step?

Oh yeah and I talked a ton of s*** to my friends bragging that it would be the best beer they ever tasted (damn male ego) :roll: so I would very much appreciate if someone could revive my hopes on this beer!

Thanks brewers!
:cheers:

Sounds like your fermentation temps were high, the yeast took off and may be finished. The only real way to know is to get a hydrometer and check a gravity.

You definitely made beer; but controlling your fermentation temps for future batches and pitching at the right temp is a huge game changer for making great beer.

[quote=“tookalisten”]Sounds like your fermentation temps were high, the yeast took off and may be finished. The only real way to know is to get a hydrometer and check a gravity.

You definitely made beer; but controlling your fermentation temps for future batches and pitching at the right temp is a huge game changer for making great beer.[/quote]

Does this mean my batch is ruined or can I pitch another pack of yeast?

thanks

[quote=“ethan2”][quote=“tookalisten”]Sounds like your fermentation temps were high, the yeast took off and may be finished. The only real way to know is to get a hydrometer and check a gravity.

You definitely made beer; but controlling your fermentation temps for future batches and pitching at the right temp is a huge game changer for making great beer.[/quote]

Does this mean my batch is ruined or can I pitch another pack of yeast?

thanks[/quote]

It sounds like to me that active fermentation is finished, so there’s no need to pitch more yeast. Just let it finish and see how it turns out. With your high fermentation temperatures, your beer may not be optimal, but it will be beer, and it might not be bad at all… :cheers:

You really need to check the specific gravity with a hydrometer. If you don’t have one, I would just let the beer sit for two to three weeks and then bottle. Unless this beer is a belgian, you’re probably going to have some off flavors, ( maybe a boozy taste ), but the yeast can finish that fast when temps are too high. If the yeast have finished, then you’d be wasting another pack of yeast.

If I were you, I would definitely invest in a hydrometer and a good thermometer.

What was the beer and yeast?

Ron

Haha. I see 65SS beat me to the punch!

Agree with others. No need to pitch more yeast. Let it ride for two weeks, bottle/keg, and drink it up.

Definitely get a hydrometer.
Quick reference:

http://www.howtobrew.com/appendices/appendixA.html

[quote=“Frenchie”]You really need to check the specific gravity with a hydrometer. If you don’t have one, I would just let the beer sit for two to three weeks and then bottle. Unless this beer is a belgian, you’re probably going to have some off flavors, ( maybe a boozy taste ), but the yeast can finish that fast when temps are too high. If the yeast have finished, then you’d be wasting another pack of yeast.

If I were you, I would definitely invest in a hydrometer and a good thermometer.

What was the beer and yeast?

Ron

Haha. I see 65SS beat me to the punch![/quote]

It was the Caribou Slobber pack bought from NorthernBrewer.

[quote=“ethan2”][quote=“Frenchie”]You really need to check the specific gravity with a hydrometer. If you don’t have one, I would just let the beer sit for two to three weeks and then bottle. Unless this beer is a belgian, you’re probably going to have some off flavors, ( maybe a boozy taste ), but the yeast can finish that fast when temps are too high. If the yeast have finished, then you’d be wasting another pack of yeast.

If I were you, I would definitely invest in a hydrometer and a good thermometer.

What was the beer and yeast?

Ron

Haha. I see 65SS beat me to the punch![/quote]

It was the Caribou Slobber pack bought from NorthernBrewer.[/quote]

My experience with the Caribou Slobber is that the active fermentation is very active and is over pretty quickly. Give it another two or three weeks and in the meantime, invest in a hydrometer and test cylinder. One other thing, your relatively high fermentation temps probably won’t be a deal breaker with this recipe, though it’ll undoubtedly have some fairly noticeable fruity esters. In any case, I hope it works out for you!! :cheers:

My experience with Caribou Slobber absolutely confirms what Marty says. My first batch fermented hot and fast, but actually turned out pretty good.Just be patient, let the yeast clean up for a couple of weeks, and you’ll probably have some pretty decent beer!

:cheers:

Ron

Same here. The Caribou Slobber was my first beer as well and I didn’t do much in the way of temperature control either so it was bubbling like crazy, had some blowoff issues, and was done in about 48 hours. I measured the gravity and it confirmed that it was done. I let it sit for an extra week, put it in the secondary (because the recipe told me to) and let it go for another two weeks. I have had them in the bottles for a while now and have given some away and people love it. I also enjoy the beer very much, and I’m not really into the brown ale style beer.

Give it some time, and then bottle it and leave it alone. I am pretty sure you will enjoy the beer you have made!

I had the same thing happen. It was fast and furious the first 24-48. Unfortunately I had temps way too high and it stayed in the primary for probably 3 weeks hoping to get out some of the “hot” flavors. I still bottled it and it’s “ok” my dad tried it last night and said it reminded him of a German beer he had while stationed over there. I’m glad I ordered it from NB they have excellent customer services, and just to make sure I actually get to try their kits properly they replaced it for me free of charge so I can try again in my fermentation freezer.

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