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Wyeast 2206 in a Helles

Would this yeast be too malty for the style? The guideline sheet says that it is better for a bocks, schwarzbiers, and other german malt bombs.

I don’t see why not. Just do eeeeeet!

Pretty funny that I right after I posted that, I heard Jamil say that you can work with one lager yeast across multiple styles. Going to give this a go and either make a Kolsch or a steam as a starter. My BJCP guidelines say that german yeasts give steams an inappropriate sulfury character, which is strange, since my last steam I made with 2206 and it was great.

It’s listed on the Wyeast site to be appropriate for the style.

http://www.wyeastlab.com/hb_yeaststrain ... cfm?ID=132

I have used it in a Helles and then the cake on a doppelbock.

Pretty funny that I right after I posted that, I heard Jamil say that you can work with one lager yeast across multiple styles. Going to give this a go and either make a Kolsch or a steam as a starter. My BJCP guidelines say that german yeasts give steams an inappropriate sulfury character, which is strange, since my last steam I made with 2206 and it was great.[/quote]
I think that’d technically be called a Dampfbier, which is essentially the German form of steam beer. Sounds like it’d be an interesting beer.
I’m working with WLP833 bock lager yeast right now. Any beer I’ve had that I knew used that yeast has been a good beer, for the most part. So it may be a mainstay for lager yeasts for me.
I’m not really a fan of the WY2124 Bohemian lager yeast overall, but it’s decent in warmer fermented beers. I’d imagine a steam/dampfbier with wy2124 would be good. But for helles, in particular, it doesn’t give me the character I’m looking for.

“Dampfbier” does translate literally as “steam beer” but it is a different beast from what we otherwise know as California Common. Dampfbiers are 100% barley based beers fermented with a German wheat beer yeast. I’ve made a couple and they can be quite yummy… one carbing up now in fact. Here’s a resource for ya:

http://www.germanbeerinstitute.com/Dampfbier.html

and yeah, that 2206 works in lots of styles, one of my favorites!

[quote=“seajellie”]“Dampfbier” does translate literally as “steam beer” but it is a different beast from what we otherwise know as California Common. Dampfbiers are 100% barley based beers fermented with a German wheat beer yeast. I’ve made a couple and they can be quite yummy… one carbing up now in fact. Here’s a resource for ya:

http://www.germanbeerinstitute.com/Dampfbier.html

and yeah, that 2206 works in lots of styles, one of my favorites![/quote]

So to make a dampfbier, I would need an ale weizen yeast?

a helles grain bill/hop schedule with a bavarian lager yeast would be pretty darn close to a helles then and not really a dampbier it seems.

Right Pietro, let me modify my previous statement because it could be misleading:

“2206 is a great yeast that works in lots of LAGER styles…”

To make a dampfbier, you use a german weissbier yeast like WLP300, 351, or 380 (or the wyeast german weissbier yeasts).

You can’t technically make a dampfbier or a kolsch with 2206 since it is a lager strain and those are ale styles, and if you tried they would not taste to style. I would not try to make a cali common fermented in the 60s with it either.

The wyeast web site gives good info on their yeast. A helles is not a far stretch from the other styles listed for 2206 like Octoberfest. FWIW, 2206 is supposedly the same strain as the WL 820, but I find the 2206 MUCH easier to work with. I’ve never been able to compare them head to head though.

Do er up and enjoy. I make viennas with this yeast at the start of most winters and it goes down fast.

Dampfbier I get. Kolsch is a hybrid style though, and though brewed at lager-ish temperatures, it is brewed with a top-fermenting ale yeast (hence it being a ‘category’ 6 in the BJCP styles “hybrid”). Not meaning to belabor this, but essentially I’m saying that the yeasts are very similar in attenuation/flocculation, and in terms of ester/phenol production (low), despite whether they are top or bottom fermenting.

FWIW, the Cali common I made with it, fermented at 60, came out GREAT. The LHBS proprietor was telling me that bavarian lager yeasts are basically what the original brewers of steam beer had (but they DIDN’T have refrigeration, and thus the style was born). I’m anxious to try it again, because I decided to dry-hop with northern brewers, which was good, but took the rustic/woodsy/mintyness a bit over the top.

It was very rich and malty, but attenuated really well and finished dry.

[/quote]FWIW, the Cali common I made with it, fermented at 60, came out GREAT. The LHBS proprietor was telling me that bavarian lager yeasts are basically what the original brewers of steam beer had (but they DIDN’T have refrigeration, and thus the style was born). I’m anxious to try it again, because I decided to dry-hop with northern brewers, which was good, but took the rustic/woodsy/mintyness a bit over the top. It was very rich and malty, but attenuated really well and finished dry.[/quote]

Several years ago I brewed a steam beer using a lager yeast that wasn’t a steam beer yeast. I do not remember which one it was other than it came from Wyeast and the high end of the range was 58. I fermented at 62 and it came out pretty good.

Several years ago I brewed a steam beer using a lager yeast that wasn’t a steam beer yeast. I do not remember which one it was other than it came from Wyeast and the high end of the range was 58. I fermented at 62 and it came out pretty good.[/quote]

Brew TV did a great episode where they were doing all sorts of faux lagers and ales made with lager yeasts at low ale/high lager temps. They mentioned that many small-mid craft commercial breweries were reporting good results doing this as well (for certain styles obviously)

Several years ago I brewed a steam beer using a lager yeast that wasn’t a steam beer yeast. I do not remember which one it was other than it came from Wyeast and the high end of the range was 58. I fermented at 62 and it came out pretty good.[/quote]

Brew TV did a great episode where they were doing all sorts of faux lagers and ales made with lager yeasts at low ale/high lager temps. They mentioned that many small-mid craft commercial breweries were reporting good results doing this as well (for certain styles obviously)

Yes, you can brew anything you want, anyway you want, call it anything you like, and love it as much as you like. Hope that settles the matter.

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