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Wohooo! I made beer!

This is so awesome. I tasted my first batch (a bit early) and it looks like beer, it tastes like beer, and I got a bit of a buzz so I think it’s beer! It’s not the best, but it tastes better than some of the other beers I have had in my life. It’s carbonated, but maybe not fully. It’s clear… But IT’S BEER MAN! One week after bottling. I will now let it go for another week before I taste again. I made a new batch of the same stuff today and it was easier to make because I was not quite as frantically running around. More organized. But here’s a question. My first batch was 1060 OG. the kit said expected is 1061. This batch is the same volume. I marked the carboy at the 5 gallon level so I know there is the same amount of liquid in there. But this batch is 1076 OG. That seems like a big difference. Am I correct? Is there a problem? I was surprised because I thought I did a much more precise job this time. What could cause such a discrepancy?

first off welcome to the obsession. now what kit bid you make, extract, all grain. next was there any steeping grains in the kit. need to know this stuff before giving any advice.

I made the Brewcraft Street’s of London Porter extract kit. It had a package of steeping grains. Two packages of Breiss DME, one dark, one amber.

well one thing that may have gave you more sugar in the second batch is the steeping grain. you may have got more sugar out of them for some reason, but I highly doubt this would account for .017 more.
I would not worry about it to much, looks like you have stronger beer this time.

Yeah that’s weird. You double checked the hydrometer reading?

Extract brewing is prone to wort stratification, even with vigorous mixing. As long as you used the right amount of extract and ended up at the right volume, it’s impossible to NOT have the correct OG. How did the OG sample taste?

I read the hydrometer, and then when I distrusted the reading I moved it and pushed it down and let it stabilize again and it was still 1.076. I tasted it and it tasted very much the same as the last batch I made. So I am very confused. I filled the test cylinder with plain water and it read 1.00 so I know the scale is correct.

Possibly they gave you more extract?

I started keeping notes with yesterdays batch. I guess I need to weigh out the ingredients from now on so that I can keep track of the exact recipe even if its a kit. That’s the funny thing about learning. You first need to identify what you need to learn.

^^^This^^^

OK. Well all seems to be working well. I have bubbling in the airlock. A thick layer of krausen on top. I do have to say though that the last time I made this kit the krausen was contained by the headroom in the carboy. This time it blew through the airlock and i had to run a tube to a container of sanitizer in place of the airlock. So who knows. I do know one thing. I’M MAKIN’ BEER!!! And the beer will be good.

What temp did you pitch at, and what temp is it fermenting at? Typically a blowout is due to one or both of these temps being too high.

I pitched at 64 degrees. I kept room ambient at 67 degrees. The brew temp stated on the directions was 68. I lowered the room ambient as the brewing progressed because the temp shown on the thermometer on the side of the carboy reached 70 at peak.

you probably dont have a sample mixed properly for the higher gravity, or your temp is drstically off. Hydromters are calibrated to a certain temp

Yep, blowout was due to the high temperature. Fermentation is exothermic, so it can be 5-10 degrees higher than ambient temp or even what the stick on thermometer says. So if the thermometer says 70, you’re probably fermenting closer to 75. Maybe not hot enough to give too many off flavors, but definitely hot enough to account for your thick krausen and your blowout. I try to keep my fermenter around 55 degrees ambient, but I’m a big advocate of “low and slow”.

Yep, blowout was due to the high temperature. Fermentation is exothermic, so it can be 5-10 degrees higher than ambient temp or even what the stick on thermometer says. So if the thermometer says 70, you’re probably fermenting closer to 75. Maybe not hot enough to give too many off flavors, but definitely hot enough to account for your thick krausen and your blowout. I try to keep my fermenter around 55 degrees ambient, but I’m a big advocate of “low and slow”.[/quote]

this isnt BBQ, low temperatures are fine if you want to suppress the esters. But slow, nah.
5-10 degree jump in temp is pretty tough to do just from fermentation

Yep, blowout was due to the high temperature. Fermentation is exothermic, so it can be 5-10 degrees higher than ambient temp or even what the stick on thermometer says. So if the thermometer says 70, you’re probably fermenting closer to 75. Maybe not hot enough to give too many off flavors, but definitely hot enough to account for your thick krausen and your blowout. I try to keep my fermenter around 55 degrees ambient, but I’m a big advocate of “low and slow”.[/quote]

this isnt BBQ, low temperatures are fine if you want to suppress the esters. But slow, nah.
5-10 degree jump in temp is pretty tough to do just from fermentation[/quote]

When I ferment with a temperature probe, if my ambient temp is 55°F, my probe settles in at 63°F at high krausen. My understanding is that the higher temperature, the more active the fermentation, which it turn further increases temp. So if I’m able to consistently get a 8° bump at 55°F, I think it’d be pretty easy to get a 10° bump at 70°. Not trying to argue brew chemistry with you, just trying to help answer OP’s questions and concerns. :cheers:

edits: holy typos batman!!

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