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Will I ever like Belgians?

It’s been years, and the only belgians I’ve managed to enjoy have been Chimay and one recently from Odell (a quad) called Woodcutter. Even in those cases I have to give my palate a pep talk “Okay, we’re drinking a belgian here. Get ready.”

Anyone else suffer this condition? I feel like there’s a whole galaxy of beer I’m missing out on.

yes, i totally agree… it might be beer blasphemy, but i am not a fan either.

I wouldn’t sweat it. You either like it or you don’t. My wife loves Belgians while I’m indifferent to the style.

I don’t think you need to try and like it. There’s too many other beers/styles that you probably do like. Drink those…

that’s the great thing about beer…something for everyone. me, I really like belgians but am no fan of IPAs (now that’s blasephemy).

cheers.

I didn’t like them to begin with. But now I do.

As you drink more and more great beers your palate may change. Also, some Belgians are very different than others. Try out some saisons, I’d recommend la merle by north coast

Are we talkin’ people or beer?
:mrgreen:

When I first started drinking craft beers, I wasn’t a huge fan. Something changed and now I am a BIG fan. I currently have a Belgian IPA on tap, a Tripel in bottles, and am brewing a Dubbel this weekend. I go through weird spurts where I’m all about a certain type of beer though. This spring it was wheats. And last fall I couldn’t get enough IPA’s and APA’s. Right now, I just happen to be on a Belgian kick.

But yeah, tastes change. Keep trying them now and then. Maybe one day you’ll surprise yourself and find yourself craving a Belgian. This sounds weird, but I trained my palate to like mustard. I’ve always hated mustard, but wished I had liked it (for hot dogs, pretzels, sausage, etc). So I started cooking with it and tasting different types in small amounts. I started liking dijon mustard and shortly after that enjoyed spicy mustard. Now I like almost any type of mustard except plain on yellow mustard. And I really enjoy using it in cooking.

[quote=“Hoppenheimer”]It’s been years, and the only belgians I’ve managed to enjoy have been Chimay and one recently from Odell (a quad) called Woodcutter. Even in those cases I have to give my palate a pep talk “Okay, we’re drinking a belgian here. Get ready.”

Anyone else suffer this condition? I feel like there’s a whole galaxy of beer I’m missing out on.[/quote]

Hey man, I get it. I have a similar aversion to Hefewiezen’s. The banana ester really turns me off.

[quote=“dobe12”]
This sounds weird, but I trained my palate to like mustard. I’ve always hated mustard, but wished I had liked it (for hot dogs, pretzels, sausage, etc). So I started cooking with it and tasting different types in small amounts. I started liking dijon mustard and shortly after that enjoyed spicy mustard. Now I like almost any type of mustard except plain on yellow mustard. And I really enjoy using it in cooking.[/quote]

Too funny. I’m in exactly the same boat. I avoided mustard like the plague until I discovered whole grain and spicy mustards.

Until I was 23 I had the same aversion to beer, because all I knew was BMC. Guinness opened my eyes to a whole, new world.

I enjoy Belgian beers, but can’t STAND all this belgian IPA or belgian stout craze that currently seems to be going around.

Dumped a Stone cali belique IPA after a couple sips. Couldn’t drink it.

Belgian IPA’s are the sh!t! Love’em! I just love the blend of american citrus hops and the funky Belgian yeast flavors. Flying Dog Raging Bitch Belgian IPA… if you can get your hands on it, DRINK IT!

[quote=“kcbeersnob”][quote=“Hoppenheimer”]It’s been years, and the only belgians I’ve managed to enjoy have been Chimay and one recently from Odell (a quad) called Woodcutter. Even in those cases I have to give my palate a pep talk “Okay, we’re drinking a belgian here. Get ready.”

Anyone else suffer this condition? I feel like there’s a whole galaxy of beer I’m missing out on.[/quote]
Hey man, I get it. I have a similar aversion to Hefewiezen’s. The banana ester really turns me off.[/quote]
No Hefewiezens or Belgians for me either. I keep checking back with them to see if my tastes have changed and nope, still dislike them. I can’t get past the phenol and esters kicked out by their yeast, seems to totally dominate the flavor of the beer and not in a way I like. Luckily there are plenty German, English and American styles I do enjoy.

[quote=“kcbeersnob”][quote=“dobe12”]
This sounds weird, but I trained my palate to like mustard. I’ve always hated mustard, but wished I had liked it (for hot dogs, pretzels, sausage, etc). So I started cooking with it and tasting different types in small amounts. I started liking dijon mustard and shortly after that enjoyed spicy mustard. Now I like almost any type of mustard except plain on yellow mustard. And I really enjoy using it in cooking.[/quote][/quote]

This was the kind of response I was looking for. I was hoping that I could train my palate in that manner. Glad to hear a success story. Looks like I’ll just have to keep plugging away at small tasters here and there.

Regarding the belgian IPA blending: I work at a taphouse and we’ve had a couple of those puppies roll in… but it’s damn hard to get rid of them because people only drink the one just to try it. While they’re interesting I don’t see them as anything more than a fad.

[quote=“Flip”][quote=“kcbeersnob”][quote=“Hoppenheimer”]It’s been years, and the only belgians I’ve managed to enjoy have been Chimay and one recently from Odell (a quad) called Woodcutter. Even in those cases I have to give my palate a pep talk “Okay, we’re drinking a belgian here. Get ready.”

Anyone else suffer this condition? I feel like there’s a whole galaxy of beer I’m missing out on.[/quote]
Hey man, I get it. I have a similar aversion to Hefewiezen’s. The banana ester really turns me off.[/quote]
No Hefewiezens or Belgians for me either. I keep checking back with them to see if my tastes have changed and nope, still dislike them. I can’t get past the phenol and esters kicked out by their yeast, seems to totally dominate the flavor of the beer and not in a way I like. Luckily there are plenty German, English and American styles I do enjoy.[/quote]

Here, Here!!

[quote=“Hoppenheimer”][quote=“kcbeersnob”][quote=“dobe12”]
This sounds weird, but I trained my palate to like mustard. I’ve always hated mustard, but wished I had liked it (for hot dogs, pretzels, sausage, etc). So I started cooking with it and tasting different types in small amounts. I started liking dijon mustard and shortly after that enjoyed spicy mustard. Now I like almost any type of mustard except plain on yellow mustard. And I really enjoy using it in cooking.[/quote][/quote]

This was the kind of response I was looking for. I was hoping that I could train my palate in that manner. Glad to hear a success story. Looks like I’ll just have to keep plugging away at small tasters here and there.

Regarding the belgian IPA blending: I work at a taphouse and we’ve had a couple of those puppies roll in… but it’s damn hard to get rid of them because people only drink the one just to try it. While they’re interesting I don’t see them as anything more than a fad.[/quote]

I can kinda see that. For me, it’s like an Imperial Russian Stout. If I drink one while out somewhere it’s really just to give it a try. I don’t seek them out and have never brewed one, but it’s just not my style. I can see people only ‘trying’ a Belgian IPA and not ordering another. But for me, that style will continue to show up on my upcoming homebrew list.

I have to say, I’m sort of in the middle on this one. I can appreciate and enjoy belgians, but only want one every now and then; definately not often enough to warrant brewing batches except if I’m planning on bottling and giving a bunch away. I put IPAs in the same boat. I think it has to do with balance (or lack there of). Most belgians are just too estery, while most IPAs are just too one-dimensionally hoppy for me.

On the other hand, I just kegged a saison that I’m sure I’m going to enjoy this summer.

I guess the first thing I wonder is, what kind of Belgian beer? There’s such a wide variety of stuff that falls under the description.

Some of it I would chug all day if I could (witbier). Some of it is fine, but doesn’t inspire me (dubbel). Some of it I think is fantastic, but only in small doses (geuze). Some of it I have a hard time thinking of as drinkable (quadrupel).

The first time a had an ipa I hated it then i drank one out of a sam adams glass and it tasted a whole lot better same when I tried NB Abbey pouring it in that glass really opened it up. I doubt I’d brew either style for me but they are nice for a change

[quote=“S.Scoggin”]I didn’t like them to begin with. But now I do.

As you drink more and more great beers your palate may change. Also, some Belgians are very different than others. Try out some saisons, I’d recommend la merle by north coast[/quote]

This man speaks the truth, also Ommegang Hennapin is a good saison

[quote=“Hoppenheimer”][quote=“kcbeersnob”][quote=“dobe12”]
This sounds weird, but I trained my palate to like mustard. I’ve always hated mustard, but wished I had liked it (for hot dogs, pretzels, sausage, etc). So I started cooking with it and tasting different types in small amounts. I started liking dijon mustard and shortly after that enjoyed spicy mustard. Now I like almost any type of mustard except plain on yellow mustard. And I really enjoy using it in cooking.[/quote][/quote]

This was the kind of response I was looking for. I was hoping that I could train my palate in that manner. Glad to hear a success story. Looks like I’ll just have to keep plugging away at small tasters here and there.

Regarding the belgian IPA blending: I work at a taphouse and we’ve had a couple of those puppies roll in… but it’s damn hard to get rid of them because people only drink the one just to try it. While they’re interesting I don’t see them as anything more than a fad.[/quote]

In one of his books food writer Stiengarden (sometime Iron Chef judge) said you can learn to like most anything, but it takes at least three times trying it.

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