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Whirlpool

I have read a lot about the technique and understand the fundamentals, but I am wondering has anybody found that their beers are better from doing a whirlpool?

My set-up is primitive, to some, and I would be using a cordless drill with an attachment to my drill (see attached photo).

I read a lot of information that states that the whirlpool should be covered and in my case that seems to not be possible. Does an uncovered whirlpool make that much of a difference? I would not splash the wort or become over zealous and run the risk of contamination. I would like to create a nice cone while my wort chills and add my flame out hops at this point.

With all that said, other than chilling the wort faster (debatable) and assisting in the trub separation, is there really a need to do a whirlpool if you have to use a cordless drill and stand over the pot for 15 minutes like a crazy man?

What are the downsides to doing a whirlpool (like my method) and what are the benefits form doing one (like my method).

I have not done one yet, but I have the paddle to do it, but just haven’t found the need to mess with my process. But… being that this is homebrew all new processes should be explored and welcomed.

Thoughts and experience is greatly appreciated.

Prost :cheers:

I use this method to help keep break material, and hop gunk in the center of my kettle. I have a little u-turn fitting on the inside of my kettles ball valve to pull wort from the outside edge and leave everything else behind. AND…I believe(not proven) that if you whirlpool opposite the direction of your chiller flow, you should in theory exchange more heat out of said wort.

Slainte!!

@The Fhunt

Thank you. My current boil kettle is not fitted with a ball valve, so I am left with the old auto-siphon method. I guess in my case I would want to position the auto-siphon towards the inner edge of the boil pot.

Quick follow-up, do you chill your wort first then whirpool, or whirlpool while your wort is chilling?

Thank you!

If you’ve got an immersion chiller you’ll certainly speed up chilling if you whirlpool while chilling. With the immersion chiller in there I was never able to get a nice cone of break material but it was good enough. For my beers that I do whirlpool hopping I keep the wort moving for 15 minutes (I’ve got a pump so a bit easier for me) and then let it settle for 15. With no flameout hops I just get all the wort moving for 5 minutes or so and then give 15 minutes for everything to settle. If you siphon from the edge you shouldn’t have an issue avoiding most of the trub and cold break.

Thank you Flip! I am going to use some Citra in an American Wheat in the near future and needed to whirlpool at the flameout. My anxiety has been eased greatly. :mrgreen:

Check out this link for info on hopstands/whirlpools. I typically chill to about 170 then start my hopstand/whirlpool because I’m hoping for increased flavor and aroma with less additional bittering.

https://byo.com/component/k2/item/2808-hop-stands

First, check this video on whirlpooling for trub separation:

http://youtu.be/G21aF7OsEZM

Actively stirring and agitating really helps cool fast with an immersion chiller, but when you’re trying to remove all the sludge floating in your beer, you really want to set it spinning and leave it (covered of course). Siphon it out from the side once it settles & you’ll leave this mound of sludge behind.

[quote=“sampothepancake”]First, check this video on whirlpooling for trub separation:

http://youtu.be/G21aF7OsEZM

Actively stirring and agitating really helps cool fast with an immersion chiller, but when you’re trying to remove all the sludge floating in your beer, you really want to set it spinning and leave it (covered of course). Siphon it out from the side once it settles & you’ll leave this mound of sludge behind.[/quote]

Thanks for the link and the response. By using the attachment that they use in the video, how can I leave it covered? Do you get the cone going, then remove the attachment, cover and leave it sit?

That is the part where I get hung up.

Yep, just let it spin on its own.

No real need to cover it up. I just stir with a long nylon spoon and then let sit for 1-2 minutes and then start the pump and run it through my CFCs. If you use an IC, you will have a more difficult time getting a nice cone of trub in the middle due to the cold break. This forms while chilling fast and it will end up in your kettle.

This is what mine looks like (but I chill in twin CFCs outside of the kettle.) I also show a link to my youtube video below it.

YouTube Video of last bit of wort

[quote=“MullerBrau”]No real need to cover it up. I just stir with a long nylon spoon and then let sit for 1-2 minutes and then start the pump and run it through my CFCs. If you use an IC, you will have a more difficult time getting a nice cone of trub in the middle due to the cold break. This forms while chilling fast and it will end up in your kettle.

This is what mine looks like (but I chill in twin CFCs outside of the kettle.) I also show a link to my youtube video below it.

YouTube Video of last bit of wort

[/quote]

Thank you MB. I unfortunately am still using an Immersion Chiller. I guess it may be time to open the wallet an splurge on a pump and CF Chiller.

Thank you all for the information. :cheers:

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