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What temperature should you boil your wort

I am about to make my first homebrew tomorrow and I was reading the directions to my kit. It talks about steeping my specialty grains and bringing my wort to boil; however, it doesn’t say at what temperature I should have my stove. Should I crank it up on high from the get-go? Or should I have it at a medium to medium-high temperature? Also do i drop my specialty grains in the cold water and let it steep for 10 minutes regardless of what the water temp is after 10 minutes of heating? or should I let the water heat up for about 3-5 minutes before starting the 10 minute steeping process? Thanks!

-Michael

At sea level, boiling is 212 deg. F. Your kit instructions should tell you the steeping temp for the specialty grains. Steep per the instructions, then raise the temp to boiling.

I believe the NB kits instruct you to steep under 170 (150-169) for ~20 minutes, then raise the temp to boiling. The reason for staying under 170 is to avoid denaturing the enzymes in the grain.

Add the grains to the water when cold. Heat the water to ~150. Let them sit for 10-20 minutes. Pull it out and put the bag in a colander. Pour 1-2qts of hot water over to get more of the flavor/sugars out. Then boil. It doesn’t need to be a “jump out of the pot” boil. Just a good rolling boil.

Also, as tempting as it may be, don’t squeeze the bag in an attempt to get every last drop out.

And make sure you don’t steep the grains too hot or with too much water, you will extract tannin from the husks and make a really harsh beer. I speak from experience

Also, as tempting as it may be, don’t squeeze the bag in an attempt to get every last drop out.[/quote]

Why not?

Also, as tempting as it may be, don’t squeeze the bag in an attempt to get every last drop out.[/quote]

Why not?[/quote]
Tannins.

[quote=“kcbeersnob”][quote]
Also, as tempting as it may be, don’t squeeze the bag in an attempt to get every last drop out.[/quote]

Tannins.[/quote]

That’s an old time myth. Tannins come from high temps and high pH.

edit: here’s a link to palmers site where he advises to squeeze the grain bag (it’s in the procedure section, first paragraph, under the recipe)

http://www.howtobrew.com/section2/chapter13-3.html

[quote=“S.Scoggin”]
That’s an old time myth. Tannins come from high temps and high pH.

edit: here’s a link to palmers site where he advises to squeeze the grain bag (it’s in the procedure section, first paragraph, under the recipe)

http://www.howtobrew.com/section2/chapter13-3.html[/quote]

For what it’s worth, Palmer deleted the squeezing step in the 2006 print version of the book (page 136).

interesting. Still, i’ve heard from many sources that it’s an old time myth. hopefully denny will weigh in.

[quote=“kcbeersnob”][quote=“S.Scoggin”]
That’s an old time myth. Tannins come from high temps and high pH.

edit: here’s a link to palmers site where he advises to squeeze the grain bag (it’s in the procedure section, first paragraph, under the recipe)

http://www.howtobrew.com/section2/chapter13-3.html[/quote]

For what it’s worth, Palmer deleted the squeezing step in the 2006 print version of the book (page 136).[/quote]

I was going to mention there may be a revision on that. But I don’t have a book handy. Does Palmer say not to squeeze the bag?

Then again, I’ve been known to be a squeezer. :shock:

I have a hard time seeing how you could be extracting tannins from the grain, when those tannins aren’t produced in the first place (if you keep your steep temp below 170, and you pH in range). Why would squeezing create or extract tannins while thoroughly rinsing wouldn’t? the grain is crushed, where are the tannins hiding?

I don’t have sources on me. hopefully someone can weigh in and enlighten us

[quote=“kcbeersnob”]
Tannins.[/quote]

Not in my experience. Have you had it happen?

There are commercial mash tuns that have a pressure plate that comes down on top of the mash bed and squeezes the bed to improve extract recovery. The old Brooklyn Brewery set up had that when I visited about a decade ago. There is no chance that squeezing the grist is going to increase the discharge of tannins from the bed. The temperature and pH of the grist have much more to do with it.

agreed, I have done 3 specialty grain and 3 bitb sets and squeezed no problems. Could squeezing become the new secondary conditioning discussion. :frowning: Cheers

[quote=“Denny”]
Not in my experience. Have you had it happen?[/quote]
No. I’ve only brewed one batch involving grain in a bag. Have been batch sparging ever since. I’ve just read it in various places over the last couple years, and thought it made sense until now.

Always something to learn/relearn with this hobby. :slight_smile:

Fwiw I squeeze my BIAB bag like it owes me money and I’ve never perceived tannins.

Good one Pietro. I’m glad I wasn’t sipping beer when I read that.
I am also a squeezer.

Since we’re on the topping of squeezing our bags (yes. I said that.), does anyone use a mesh bag for hops in the boil kettle? We have a nylon one and we squeeze it to drain the wort out after the boil.once the liquid runs a hoppy pulse green, we stop squeezing.

Any issues with that kind of squeezing?

None.

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