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Wet or dry

so the smackpacks seems like a huge pain in the tucus compared to dry yeast. making starters compared to just pitching an extra package of dry, no contest. so there must be some reason why everyone goes to the extra hassle and expense of wet yeast? all the extract kits offer the option of smack packs it seems, should i just be getting that when offered? is it always better or just different? and if i am unsure what should the “default” be, just go for the wyeast? thanx in advance for the help, just getting my feet wet here!

Yes, you can use only dry yeast if it has the properties you’re looking for (e.g., US-05 instead of WLP001 or Wyeast 1056). I like to brew using a wider variety of yeast than are available dry.

The cost of using liquid yeast is quite comparable to or even less than dry if you can harvest or propagate yeast for reuse. A couple weeks ago I pitched from a starter of Wyeast 1272 and saved some to propagate for future starters. I expect to get 8-9 pitches from the one pack at a cost of ~$1 per pitch plus a bit more for DME. I could get even more pitches from it and drive the per pitch cost down further if I elect to go beyond three generations.

#1 reason to use liquid, variety. Some things you just can’t do with a dry yeast. There is getting to be more variety in the dry yeast. But still a way to go.

And like KC said, saving and reusing a liquid yeast 2-3 times (or more) will drive down your cost.

Is it absolutely necessary to make a starter, many really good beers have been make with out doing so. Keep your temps in check and I bet you will be happy with the results of not making a starter.

Dry yeast have ~double the cell count of a liquid yeast pack. No need to use 2 packs. Unless you are making a super high gravity brew.

Just did my eighth batch, and used dry yeast for the first time ever (US 05). It just felt wrong that it was so easy… but fermentation took off quicker than it ever has with a smack pack, starter made from a smack pack, or repitching harvested yeast. I think I may be a dry yeast convert for bog standard American ales that don’t require specific yeast character.

I use Wyeast for the majority of my beers with zero issues and have never used a starter (even though I want to get one). I normally buy two just in case one gets damaged in shipping (which hasn’t happened) to be on the save side and to have backups on hand. I just use two when brewing a higher gravity beer. Come to think of it I only used dry yeast once and there was no difference in time of fermentation starting that I noticed. Like mention by others, I like having a larger variety to pick from and as long as you follow the directions about letting it sit awhile and pitching temperature before using you should be good to go without a starter.

Most dry packs have 11g of yeast which is plenty for most average beers, you do not need two unless you are getting really high up on gravity. Use Mr. Malty for your pitching rates.
There is way way more liquid yeast than dry.
You can use whatever yeast you want on any beer, depends on the flavors your going for. The defaults are usually into a certain style guideline. THe only difference between WL and WY is that WY you can check viability with the smack pack, WL you would have to make a starter. You need to pay attention to dates on your pack to viability drops as it ages.
SOme beers you are making may not need a starter if the gravity is low enough but that is low 1.040 range, if your shipping them especially in heat I would always make a starter…just safe insurance.

thanx to all of you. i have already found and will use the mr. malty yeast calculator, a great tool. but my original (if somewhat confusing) question remains - as an absolute beginner who doesn’t know jack about different yeast flavor profiles, when i go to buy an extract kit would you suggest getting the wyeast “upgrade” or just stick with the dry? i would assume having two options listed means either one will fit the flavor profile of the beer being brewed. i understand that once i get some experience here i can go with whatever i like, but i have no idea what i like yet. (just your opinions, i know there are no right or wrong answers here).

Sorry, but my answer would depend on the kit. In most cases, the dry should be fine.

I would just go with dry if the beer allows it, your just starting, get your process down make it easy as possible. You can always buy two yeast and split batches to you can compare
Brew some simple beers, dont start brewing DIPA, RIS and stuff stick with lower gravity beers.

I would just go with dry if the beer allows it, your just starting, get your process down make it easy as possible. You can always buy two yeast and split batches to you can compare
Brew some simple beers, dont start brewing DIPA, RIS and stuff stick with lower gravity beers.[/quote]

+1
Keep it simple until the process feels comfortable to you.

Personally, I just go with the Northern Brewer default. Sometimes it is dry, sometimes it is liquid.

They always have a choice, there isn’t really a default

good advice, thanx guys. i guess at the end of the day, who cares. it’s all recommended and will all work. maybe i will buy each kit i like twice and try both. :wink:

I see what you did there. you were looking for an excuse to make twice the beer and are using us like pawns to justify it (ha ha). :lol:

I see what you did there. you were looking for an excuse to make twice the beer and are using us like pawns to justify it (ha ha). :lol: [/quote]

and you fell right in to my cunning trap

I see what you did there. you were looking for an excuse to make twice the beer and are using us like pawns to justify it (ha ha). :lol: [/quote]

and you fell right in to my cunning trap[/quote]

touché haha very smooth.

Its, Good name btw.

Go with DRY for now until you are a few beers into process and have a handle on the important things first. IE: Ferment temps, sanitation, process etc…

Dry has advantage of high pitch count and no need to add O2 to the wort prior to pitching also!!

ITs, dry is stellar if you find a strain you like for the beers you enjoy.
For me its these four and the true Hefe strains are decent too, I have tasted the hefe strains just never personally used them:
A. W34/70 Lager ( Have used in pils, dunkel, marzen, bock all were great. )
B. Nottingham ( Have used in any english style and have no issue whatsoever. )
C. US-05 ( Use all the time for american pale, IPA, Am brown, Am wheat on and on, anything I want a clean yeast profile I use Us-05. ) Just pitched into a regular recipe Simcoe RyePA that comes off excellent every time no fail with a plain ole one pack of US-05!
D. T-58 ( I have used for a ONE Belgian trippel and it did the job. )

Now this being said if your a funk, sour, or Belgian beer only fan your going to need to learn the whys and where fores of proper liquid yeast usage. If you already know mr malty read or reread Jamils article about 14 essential yeast topics to get a good intro on this heavy subject matter. As his article sums up quite a bit you’ll need to know.

[quote=“ITsPossible”]Its, Good name btw.

Dry has advantage of high pitch count and no need to add O2 to the wort prior to pitching also!!
.[/quote]

You still want o2

[quote=“grainbelt”][quote=“ITsPossible”]Its, Good name btw.

Dry has advantage of high pitch count and no need to add O2 to the wort prior to pitching also!!
.[/quote]

You still want o2[/quote]

Not really. The purpose of O2 is for cell growth. When you use dry yeast, there are so many more cells as compared to liquid (even with a starter) that the need for cell growth is greatly reduced.

[quote=“Denny”][quote=“grainbelt”][quote=“ITsPossible”]Its, Good name btw.

Dry has advantage of high pitch count and no need to add O2 to the wort prior to pitching also!!
.[/quote]

You still want o2[/quote]

Not really. The purpose of O2 is for cell growth. When you use dry yeast, there are so many more cells as compared to liquid (even with a starter) that the need for cell growth is greatly reduced.[/quote]

gravity dependent, and rehydrating etc…

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