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Water Questions

So, I’d like some recommendations for bottled water.

Currently, I’m using bottled water from either Cub Foods, or Walmart. Typically their spring water. It seems to work pretty well and I get good beer results. But I’m wondering if reverse osmosis water might be better.

Also, I had a thought about cooling the wort. I am doing partial boil extract kits, typically 3 gallons (my stove can’t really handle a 6 gallon boil). I was thinking I could add chilled bottled water to the the wort to help speed the cooldown.

Then I considered that the cool water is probably relatively oxygenated, and I am concerned this could cause oxidation if it is added to the hot wort during cooldown. I also thought that this would increase the volume of the wort, thus overall taking longer to cool in an ice bath.

Any thoughts on this?

spring water is fine. the extracts already have minerals & such from when it was made. using RO water would be just fine too. it would be more important to know your water profiles if you were going AG. don’t worry about the chilled water being oxygenated. the yeast need O2 in the beginning of the fermentation. you’ll want to aerate the 5 gallons before pitching yeast.

Right, I understand the difference between oxidation and aeration. What i normally do is pour some water out of the jug into the primary fermenter, then vigorously shake up the bottle to aerate the water, then I pour the cooled wort into the aerated water.

My concern is that adding aerated water to the HOT wort to chill it might cause oxidation, since i’d be introducing potential oxygen at hot temperatures.

[quote=“VikingBeerGuzzler”]Right, I understand the difference between oxidation and aeration. What i normally do is pour some water out of the jug into the primary fermenter, then vigorously shake up the bottle to aerate the water, then I pour the cooled wort into the aerated water.

My concern is that adding aerated water to the HOT wort to chill it might cause oxidation, since i’d be introducing potential oxygen at hot temperatures.[/quote]
I add O2 to most of my wort through a diffusion stone. you don’t want to aerate or add O2 after it’s approximately 30-40% done fermenting in most cases. that will cause oxidization.

No… I’m not asking how to aerate.

I’m asking if adding chilled water to the wort to speed up the cool down after the boil can cause oxidation.

Also, Do you think it would take more time to get the wort to pitching temperature because of the larger volume of wort after adding chilled water.

[quote=“VikingBeerGuzzler”]No… I’m not asking how to aerate.

I’m asking if adding chilled water to the wort to speed up the cool down after the boil can cause oxidation.

Also, Do you think it would take more time to get the wort to pitching temperature because of the larger volume of wort after adding chilled water.[/quote]

I don’t think the amount of O2 added from the chilled water would matter much relative to oxidation since it’s going to cool down fairly quick that way.

I think it would reach pitching temperature faster with the addition of the chilled water. Some of the heat energy will be transferred directly that way, which should be more efficient than the heat exchange in the ice bath.

Thanks. Sometimes I overthink this stuff, and I need someone with more experience to tell me that I’m being too anal :wink:

that is not what I’m telling you.

no, it can’t. any O2 in the water/wort will be consumed by the yeast in early fermentation. it will not oxidize your beer.

[quote=“VikingBeerGuzzler”]Also, Do you think it would take more time to get the wort to pitching temperature because of the larger volume of wort after adding chilled water.[/quote]it depends on how low you’re chilling the wort prior to adding the cool top off water and how cold your your top off water is. I’d suggest buying or making an immersion chiller. it’s much quicker than an ice bath and easier to control how low to chill to get to pitching temps.

Edward,

My understanding is that oxygen added to the wort when it’s above 100 degrees can cause oxidation.

That is, when the wort is hot, it tends to bond the oxygen to the wort rather than simply aerate it. This is the reason for trying to cool the wort as fast as possible, to reduce oxidation risk.

So logically, if the wort is hot (150-200 degrees) and I add fresh chilled water that may cary a great deal of oxygen, it would seem that this could cause oxidation. Oxygen introduced into the wort when it’s below 100 degrees would provide oxygen for the yeast. Oxygen introduced above 100 degrees can bond to the wort and not be available for the yeast.

So I don’t quite understand what you mean by “it can’t”.

Oh, and I completely agree about the wort chiller, but I have a lot of other things I’d prefer to spend my money on first. I see the wort chiller as important for AG brewing, but I need things like a bigger burner so i can do a full boil and what not first.

have it your way, brofish. just trying to help. but a chiller should be high on your “firsts” list. it’ll be harder to drop temp on a full boil than a partial. and if you drop wort temp before adding your top off water, then you’ll have no problem with bonding O2. happy brewing.

Your concern is with HSA (hot side ariation). Many feel this is a myth, a boogyman.

I would not be to concerned with a little splashing of cold water (or the O2 in the water) into the boil kettle post boil. Try to limit it as much as you can. But don’t be parinoid about it.

If you do a full boil, you will want a immersion chiller btw. So you kinda need them at the same time.

Also, if you add more water to you kettle to chill the wort, that is that much more that you have to balance as you try to pour it into the funnel…unless you dropped some dough already and got a kettle with a ball valve.

also you try and cool wort as soon as possible because you want to get it in your carboy and seal it as fast as possible to avoid contamination.

Nighthawk,

Thanks for that, It’s nice to know I don’t have to worry so much about HSA. I know there’s a lot of “myths” and urban legends about this stuff, but I thought I had read this in a fairly well known place (like palmers book or somewhere similar).

Nice to know that there’s disagreement. That usually means if there is an issue, it’s not strong enough to affect most people.

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