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Warm to the touch = don't pitch?

I’m a little worried that my wort in a yeast starter wasn’t cooled enough before I added the yeast. I was in a hurry out the door and wanted to get the yeast in before I left. After pouring the smack pack in, I realized that my glass container felt a little warm to the touch. Considering body temperature is 98.6 degrees, I am worried that my wort was warmer than that!

I did notice some slow fermentation happening before I went to bed. In the morning it seemed to be going very slowly if not finished already. There is definitely a layer of yeast on the bottom.

the hot temperature could have shocked the yeast on introduction, causing a slow start. yeast like warm temperatures, but warm temperatures don’t make the best beer. either way it was probably very warm during fermentation which could cause a lot of fusel alcohol; giving the beer a hot taste.
but without a temperature reading i cant know for sure.

in the future, for ales, you really want to get the beer in the mid to low 60s (Fahrenheit). for the best results

[quote=“S.Scoggin”]the hot temperature could have shocked the yeast on introduction, causing a slow start. yeast like warm temperatures, but warm temperatures don’t make the best beer. either way it was probably very warm during fermentation which could cause a lot of fusel alcohol; giving the beer a hot taste.
but without a temperature reading i cant know for sure.

in the future, for ales, you really want to get the beer in the mid to low 60s (Fahrenheit). for the best results[/quote]

All true, but he was making a starter.

[quote=“Denny”]
All true, but he was making a starter.[/quote]

wooops :oops:

missed that part…

You can make starters as warm as 105F or so and not harm the yeast - in fact, they prefer the warmer temps and will ferment a lot faster. Just be sure to chill and decant the spent beer before pitching.

Great help, thanks to all!

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