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Velvet Rooster

I am a novice home brewer. I am considering brewing the Tallgrass Velvet Rooster Extract Kit. Is this a difficult kit to brew? Are there any special techniques I should know? Would I need any special equipment?
Thank you for your input.

[quote=“mmmmstout”]I am a novice home brewer. I am considering brewing the Tallgrass Velvet Rooster Extract Kit. Is this a difficult kit to brew? Are there any special techniques I should know? Would I need any special equipment?
Thank you for your input.[/quote]

Not the best beer for a novice, due to having to make a yeast starter because of the high alcohol content if you stick with their recommended yeast . The high alcohol content makes your choice of yeast with no special equipment a bit touchy, but it can be done with no special equipment with the right yeast. Safbrew S-33 dry yeast is tailor made for it. If you’re still interested in brewing it, let me know. You are just going to need patience, because this particular beer will not be ready to drink in less than two months…

P.S.

You can definitely brew this beer with no special equipment if you are willing to give it the time it needs. The higher the alcohol content of the beer, the longer it takes as a general rule… Now I’m tempted to brew one of these and leave it in the closet for a year. It sounds like an awesome recipe!

:cheers:

That kit looks delicious.
A couple of things I’d notice for a first time brewer, Kits usually include packs of hop pellets in 1 oz sizes. NONE of the additions in the recipe are even multiples on 1 oz, so you’ll have to have a scale to weigh out each addition before you add. (Personally, I’d just eyeball it, but admitting such may be flame bait. :slight_smile: )

You can avoid doing a starter if you buy a second pack of yeast. Just pitch them both. But that’s adding another $6.25 to an already expensive kit.

I would recommend La Petite Orange as your gateway kit first. It’s a Dubbel, but has some very Tripel-like qualities. It’s easier to brew, cheaper, and will be ready sooner.

If you like high-alcohol beers, yeast starters should be the first non-novice technique you learn. Starters are pretty easy AND directly save money, over buying multiple packs. Many brewers won’t even consider buying more than one. (Many even recycle yeast, getting multiple batches from a single purchase; but I’m personally not there yet.)

The higher the original gravity of a brew means more yeast is needed. More yeast means the temperature of the wort will quickly rise as fermentation begins. Be ready to use a method of keeping the wort cool and at a constant temperature for a few days after fermentation begins. Best fermentation temperature will be based on the temp range of the yeast you use.

If you’re dead-set on brewing Velvet Rooster (and why not, looks great!), you can get away with no special anything by brewing a starter beer. No fuss, no muss method: brew a 2.5 gal Patersbier (recipe from NB) and use the whole yeast cake for a 5 gal Rooster. No special equipment, no yeast rinsing, no nothing.

If a 2.5 gal batch offends, brew a 5 gal Patersbier and use 1/3 to 1/2 of the cake. Otherwise, you’d be best served making a yeast starter for this one.

[quote=“Fu Shen”]If you’re dead-set on brewing Velvet Rooster (and why not, looks great!), you can get away with no special anything by brewing a starter beer. No fuss, no muss method: brew a 2.5 gal Patersbier (recipe from NB) and use the whole yeast cake for a 5 gal Rooster. No special equipment, no yeast rinsing, no nothing.

If a 2.5 gal batch offends, brew a 5 gal Patersbier and use 1/3 to 1/2 of the cake. Otherwise, you’d be best served making a yeast starter for this one.[/quote]

I just racked a honey molasses porter right on top of the yeast cake from a Dusseldorf Altbier, and it took off like a shot within two hours. Probably a little overkill, but I forgot to mention to the OP that he could do this with great results and no starter. Good suggestion!!!

:cheers:

Thank you for all the great advice!!! I am going to give it a shot. I have a yeast starter kit and the materials for a swamp cooler. I purchased a new 5 gal carboy so that I can let this one condition without interrupting production of other kits. I plan to brew next week when I have a few days off in a row so that I can monitor fermenting temp. I will let you know how it turns out.

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