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Undercarbonation !?

I brewed a batch of Northern Brewer Rebel Red Ale recently, followed directions exactly. About 10 days in Primary, and racked to Secondary for another week. Beer looked and smelled awesome when I bottled it.

I bottled this 5 gallon batch into bomber bottles with Coopers Carbonation drops, which have worked well for me before…2 drops per bomber. However, 3 weeks after bottling, I am opening multiple bottles to find them totally FLAT and NO noticeable carbonation whatsoever. I’m stumped, never had this before. There has to be some residual sugars in the bottles to provide carbonation?

So now I’m trying to salvage any drinkable beer out of this batch.

Question - Do you think opening each of the bottles back up and dropping in another 1-2 Coopers Carbonation Drops (again) into each bottle would help to provide some ability to carbonate this batch and bottles?

thanks!
Greg

The worst thing you could do is add more sugar - that’s a recipe for exploding bottles. What you need is either more yeast, or to get the yeast that’s in there active.

For starters, make sure the bottles are in an area that’s at least 60°F. Preferably 70-80°F. Gently invert the bottles a few times a day to keep the yeast in suspension. If after two weeks of that the bottles still aren’t carbonated, rehydrate about 1-2 g of dry yeast and add it to the bottles with a medicine dropper, then re-cap.

[quote=“a10t2”]The worst thing you could do is add more sugar - that’s a recipe for exploding bottles. What you need is either more yeast, or to get the yeast that’s in there active.

For starters, make sure the bottles are in an area that’s at least 60°F. Preferably 70-80°F. Gently invert the bottles a few times a day to keep the yeast in suspension. If after two weeks of that the bottles still aren’t carbonated, rehydrate about 1-2 g of dry yeast and add it to the bottles with a medicine dropper, then re-cap.[/quote]
this here, I agree with.

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