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Too much head!

Normally i wouldnt complain about this sort of thing, but when i pour my brew (yes the right way) i get way too much head. Whats up with that. This is my first home brew. NB American Wheat

Couple of likely suspects:

  1. You used too much priming sugar in the entire batch, or,
  2. You didn’t completely mix the priming sugar throughout the batch, so some bottles are over-carbed and some under-carbed.

One other thing that it could be is it was under attenuated when it was bottled.

Thanks guys. primary didnt seem to last too long. only a couple of days so it might be one or the other or both i guess. still tastes good though!

even when primary seems to be done. give it at least 2 weeks on the yeast just to be sure. to let the yeast clean up after themselves

[quote=“Big Goat”]Thanks guys. primary didnt seem to last too long. only a couple of days…[/quote]How long between yeast pitch and bottling? What was the OG and FG?

One way to deal with excess carbonation is to pour the bottle into the glass and then wait a few minutes to allow it to warm up and de-gas. If they’re all consistently over-carbed, you’ll quickly figure out the sweetspot on how long to wait (start with five minutes and see how it is).

It also helps to put the beer in the fridge for at least a couple of days before opening.

I actually have this issue right now. I poured the beer out into a glass and the first 3 ounces filled the entire pint glass with head. Should I be worried about bottle bombs?

TOO MUCH!?

Someone had to…

I was wondering when that would happen.

Two weeks from pitch till bottle. Only been in bottle for 10 days(might have something to do with it.) Also, just opened one up with too much head and one perfect, so probably didn’t mix the priming sugar well? OG 1.034 and fg 1.016. I’m thinking when i diluted before pitching i didn’t mix water in well and that was the reason for the lower og. Rookie! Anyway, next time I will mix the priming sugar in well and also use a priming calculator to make sure I’m not over priming. Thanks for all the posts!

To me, I am not sure it was finished fermenting based on you OG and FG numbers. If it was, you brewed very light beer.

I have had a problem with too much head on my last few batches too, all of which had plenty of time to finish up in the primary. I have just been adding the full packet of priming sugar (5 oz) to each batch so that is probably it? Are there any nasties that might cause this ? I heard that somewhere…

[quote=“alanzo”]TOO MUCH!?

Someone had to…[/quote]

This.^

Make sure that a) the priming sugar packet is 5 oz and b) that 5 oz is correct for the volume of beer you are priming. Way back when, I used a 1 lb packet of sugar when I thought it was only 5 oz. Major overcarbonation (thankfully, no bottle bombs).

Good call, I have just been going on faith that it is the right amount but I should definitely start measuring. Also, I have been looking at the carbonation calculator which shows the relationship between temperature and carbonation level. Is the temperature part the calc for only during the 2 weeks of carbing or does it relate to the max temperature that the beer will see in the bottle. For example, if i keep the beer at 70 for the first 2 weeks after bottling then were to, say, put it in the attic for storage at temps up to 90+, would I use 70 for the calc or 90?

Sadly, I don’t have a very good spot to keep my beers in the summer…Can’t buy a house with a basement because I spend too much on homebrew equipment…

[quote=“althiels”] Is the temperature part the calc for only during the 2 weeks of carbing or does it relate to the max temperature that the beer will see in the bottle.[/quote]Neither. The temp that they want is the highest temp that the beer reached during active fermentation - this is what determines the CO2 volume in the beer prior to conditioning.

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