The EFFECT of higher O.G. than predicted?

Interesting to see all the “efficiency” posts on here recently, so let me ask a question regarding that…

I just finished up brewing the NB Irish Red, and it was “supposed” to have an O.G. of 1.044.

With my BIAB process, I hit 1.054 (at 64 degrees) for a 5 gallon batch. I pitched the yeast, locked it up, cleaned up, and jumped on here.

My question is - what is the EFFECT of having a higher O.G. than “predicted?” Should I expect a higher F.G.? A beer with more alcohol? Different taste? Is there a reason to “force” the “correct” O.G.???

Thanks!

Yes to all. The FG will be higher, by about 1 point for every four that you exceeded OG. Alcohol level should be higher, by something around 1% for every ten points you exceeded OG. The beer flavor will not be the same either, as the ratio of bitterness to residual sugar (the cause of that FG) will not be as it was designed to be. So your beer will taste a bit sweeter than it should.

If I miss OG by a few point, I don’t sweat it. 10 points is in the range where I would consider adding some extra water to bring it closer to target, but not so far out that it would be radically off. You might like it better that way - up to you.

Brew day yesterday was for all grain Slobber"2.0"(did the extract version 14 months ago as my first home brew, didn’t we all?) and hit the mark yesterday spot on 1.052. :smiley:
Calculating water volume is crucial to BIAB. How much pre boil volume for lbs of grain bill did you use?

You have you put the recipe into some software with adjustment to your efficiency. That’s the proble with kits. You are going with their numbers which will vary with your efficiency. I don’t know but I would bet that when they design their all grain they er on the low side of efficiency. My system gets good efficiency so when I copy a recipe generally I have to adjust it down.

I just bottled my De Belge Farmhouse IPA
http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/brewing/recipe-kits/all-grain-biab-kits/de-belge-extra-bitter-biab-all-grain-kit.html
and can confirm everything rebuilt said.

Even after topping up a bit I was still at an OG of 1.076 well above the predicted 1.060. We sampled about half a beer’s worth after filling 29 bottles from the 3-gallon kit. While I was expecting a dry, hoppy, peppery beer; this was definitely on the sweeter side. So that hop-to-residual sugar ratio was absolutely shifted to the sweeter side. FG was 1.020, which actually has me a bit concerned about gushers, so I also held back a bit on the priming sugar.

While it’s not going to match the descriptions, I still think this will be a nice refreshing beer once it conditions; it really has me thinking of a nice warm spring day. I fermented with the dry T-58, WY-3942 was also recommended, but I was actually thinking of re-visiting this one when it’s warmer and subbing in one of the Abbey Ale yeasts. (1214, 1762)

Hmmmm… maybe I was a bit TOO concerned with sucking as much out of the mash as I could. Here’s what I did…

I have your basic BIAB starter kit, so I have a 20qt kettle. With roughly 3.5 gal of water, plus my grain bag, I’m pretty much topped off for mashing.

Knowing my grain bag ends up pulling a bunch of water out with it (even after draining/squeezing), I thought… “Hmmm… I could “sparge” this bag in another kettle of 153 degree water, and use THAT “thin wort” to top off for my boil.”

So that is what I did: I took 7 gallons of water and split it between the two kettles, and heated both to mash temp. In the primary kettle, I mashed for the hour, lifted and drained the bag, then moved the bag to the other kettle, stirred/oscillated the bag for a bit to “wash” the grains, then lifted the bag out, squeezed/drained it, then used the “sparge” water in the secondary kettle to top off the boil kettle.

Further over-thinking things, I said: "Hmmm…I need to leave some room in the boil kettle so I don’t boil over, so I’ll have “extra” water/thin wort in the secondary kettle, so why not just go ahead and boil that too, and then top off with THAT once I’m ready to cool.

So that’s what I did. I used NO “clean” water to top anything off with. Needless to say, I’ve got sweet wort!

Now I’m really interested in what JMcK said about adjusting priming sugar! …once fermenting is done, IF I’m still several points high in my F.G. (which as you guys say I most likely will be…), will I need to adjust my priming sugar? …I’m bottling.

Thanks.

So what I did with the priming sugar was just me thinking, “there’s still unfermented sugar in there,” and not anything coming from expertise or training. (believe me, I have neither.) I just thought maybe my fermentation was a bit stuck, and I know that carbing a stuck fermentation can lead to gushers/bombs. Actually reading this thread was reassuring me that maybe it wasn’t stuck and just where it wanted to end given where it started.

I have this love-hate relationship with some of those saison strains, meaning I love Saisons, but the saison strains hate me. I let them get as warm as they want, and I get patient and follow every suggestion I read, but I just can’t get them to go below 1.020 for me. This is actually the best I’ve done so far. Saison yeast was responsible for my first bottle bomb, and my last Saison I nicknamed the threesome, because I would open 3 bottles at a time, just to have enough to fill a glass after the foaming stopped. For me a good saison is like that girl you keep pursuing long after you realize you’re probably not going to hit that, and even if you do, it’ll never live up to the hype you’ve built in your head.

[quote=“JMcK”]I just bottled my De Belge Farmhouse IPA
http://www.northernbrewer.com/shop/brewing/recipe-kits/all-grain-biab-kits/de-belge-extra-bitter-biab-all-grain-kit.html
and can confirm everything rebuilt said.

Even after topping up a bit I was still at an OG of 1.076 well above the predicted 1.060. We sampled about half a beer’s worth after filling 29 bottles from the 3-gallon kit. While I was expecting a dry, hoppy, peppery beer; this was definitely on the sweeter side. So that hop-to-residual sugar ratio was absolutely shifted to the sweeter side. FG was 1.020, which actually has me a bit concerned about gushers, so I also held back a bit on the priming sugar.

While it’s not going to match the descriptions, I still think this will be a nice refreshing beer once it conditions; it really has me thinking of a nice warm spring day. I fermented with the dry T-58, WY-3942 was also recommended, but I was actually thinking of re-visiting this one when it’s warmer and subbing in one of the Abbey Ale yeasts. (1214, 1762)[/quote]

Try wy3711 French saison yeast. And mash about 148. Believe me it will go down to .010.

Rebuilt…

I did more thinking on this… Why would F.G. be any higher???

Yeast only knows to do one thing: eat food. The more food, the more eating and growth, until there is no more food to eat. The yeast doesn’t know what my O.G. is/was, so why wouldn’t they just keep eating/growing until there was no more food to be had (close to 1.010 F.G.)???

Each yeast strain has an attenuation % : how much they can ferment out. Granted that % is a lab estimate and yeast don’t read, but a strain that attenuates 76% will give a FG lower than a strain that attenuates at 70%.
So if you start at 1.050, a 70% should give you a FG around 1.015. If the OG was 1.060 the FG should be 1.018.
By the way, yesterday I took the NB AG Irish Red kit , tweaked it up to 1.052 on purpose. I didn’t add any additional hops, but played around a little with the timing to up the IBUs a bit. Did the same technique back in September and that turned out great.

It’s like Jim says. The yeast eat only a % of the sugars present. That’s because the wort it made up of a mix of many different sugars, and some of them are not digestible by the yeast. If the wort only had sucrose, dextrose and fructose in it (like wine), the yeast would eat it all and you would end up with a FG below 0.

Which brings up a very good and well established method for forcing the FG lower: replace (don’t just add) some of the malt sugars with simple and easily digestible sugars - like table sugar. That’s how they do it in Belgium, where you might get a trippel with OG = 1.090 and FG = 1.010.

Hmmmmmmmm… Interesting! Thanks!

I did the same with the NB Irish Red I brewed. I wasn’t as far off as you (they said 1.044 and I was 1.048 or so). I had lower mash temps also because I underestimated how hot I needed my strike water to be, so that explains that.

Overall higher ABV, still good though. The yeast I prepared for it really tore through it nicely. The Irish Red was a big hit this past weekend at a friend’s party, so enjoy it when it’s done!

Awesome! She’s bubbling away right now, so I’ll try to remember to do an update after all things are said and done, and I’ve gone through a few rounds of “tasting.” LOL!