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Syrupy Eisbock

Hey all,

I brewed a pretty hefty Eisbock 3 months ago - I watched it ferment and then transferred it into secondary for a lengthy aging period. However, I noticed yesterday that the consistency of the brew was incredibly viscous and a small taste test revealed a sickly sweet beer.

I’m fairly new to brewing but to me that speaks to poor attenuation. Am I safe with repitching and letting it age longer or is there another mistake that I’m making?

Thanks!

[quote=“docturknowles”]Hey all,

I brewed a pretty hefty Eisbock 3 months ago - I watched it ferment and then transferred it into secondary for a lengthy aging period. However, I noticed yesterday that the consistency of the brew was incredibly viscous and a small taste test revealed a sickly sweet beer.

I’m fairly new to brewing but to me that speaks to poor attenuation. Am I safe with repitching and letting it age longer or is there another mistake that I’m making?

Thanks![/quote]

Sounds like an eisbock to me. Repitching may or may not do anything. It’s entirely possible that you’ve reached the limit of fermentation and more yeast won’t do anything. It depends a lot on your recipe and techniques.

What was your recipe? All grain or extract? Mash Temperature?
What was the hop schedule?
What yeast did you use?
Did you pitch enough yeast?
What was your primary fermentation temperature?
How long did it remain in the primary?
What was the SG when transferred to secondary?

Eisbocks are generally very malty.

To many unanswered questions, but my gut would say under-attenuated, it was transferred to secondary too soon and/or your hop schedule may not have been aggressive enough, of course there could be a million other things too like not enough yeast, too cool fermentation, etc…

If you’re lagering it now, did you just cold crash and begin to lager or did you slowly lower the temperature? Generally, before lagering, you’ll want to ensure it’s within a point or two of FG.

You could try to warm it up and pitch more yeast, which may or may not work, depending on the amount of fermentables left.

No reason to pitch more yeast without at least taking a gravity reading, or even better doing a fast ferment test to see if there are any fermentables left.

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