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Sugar

What is the best type to use when priming for borrowing? I usually use just normal granulated store bought

That is all I’ve ever used. Well I did use Priming sugar in the begining from our host, but plain old table sugar works just as well.

for borrowing?

I just use table sugar and have for years. Every now and then I’ll use malt extract if I am bottle conditioning a malty German style beer like an Alt.

I used hard candies one time to add unique flavors to the beer. Worked pretty well, though I’ve been told the Fisherman’s Friend beer was the worst I’ve ever made. I’ve also been told it was the best, but I tend to agree with the other opinion.

For years I have used corn sugar, i.e. dextrose for bottling because I like the results, and table sugar and/or candi syrups in the boil (pre-fermentation). I’m not sure if it is outdated thinking, but in a 2001 (old) BYO article, Chris Colby recommends avoiding table sugar for bottling because it can impart a cidery taste.

http://byo.com/stories/article/indices/ ... echniques-

I only borrow table table sugar. I might be able to borrow corn syrup but I wouldn’t be sure of the fructose content. I prime with sucrose, uninverted that is.

[quote=“brewsumore”]For years I have used corn sugar, i.e. dextrose for bottling because I like the results, and table sugar and/or candi syrups in the boil (pre-fermentation). I’m not sure if it is outdated thinking, but in a 2001 (old) BYO article, Chris Colby recommends avoiding table sugar for bottling because it can impart a cidery taste.

http://byo.com/stories/article/indices/ ... echniques-[/quote]

I’ve been priming with table sugar for about 5 years without getting any cidery flavors. I think that’s outdated thinking.

[quote=“BrewingRover”][quote=“brewsumore”]For years I have used corn sugar, i.e. dextrose for bottling because I like the results, and table sugar and/or candi syrups in the boil (pre-fermentation). I’m not sure if it is outdated thinking, but in a 2001 (old) BYO article, Chris Colby recommends avoiding table sugar for bottling because it can impart a cidery taste.

http://byo.com/stories/article/indices/ ... echniques-[/quote]

I’ve been priming with table sugar for about 5 years without getting any cidery flavors. I think that’s outdated thinking.[/quote]

Outdated definitely. And certainly no problem for bottling.
For some brews it’s appropriate to even use 10-15% table sugar as the fermentables and still not get a cidery taste (and if you use the right specialty malts, the body doesn’t even suffer).
Bottom line is there’s just little reason for paying the premium price for corn sugar whether for goosing up the fermentables or bottling.

[quote=“The Professor”]Outdated definitely. And certainly no problem for bottling.
For some brews it’s appropriate to even use 10-15% table sugar as the fermentables and still not get a cidery taste (and if you use the right specialty malts, the body doesn’t even suffer).
Bottom line is there’s just little reason for paying the premium price for corn sugar whether for goosing up the fermentables or bottling.[/quote]
+1, and in fact for some beers you want to add sugar to the boil either to intentionally lighten the body or in the case of dark sugars to add a suble taste. It’s not just to bump ABV, and it certainly will not add a cidery taste.

I realize that glucose and fructose, the components of sucrose (table sugar) are highly fermentable by saccharomyces cerevisiae. And truly, many brewers use table sugar for bottling with excellent results.

I just ponder on why so many brewers use dextrose for bottling in place of sucrose. At the point of bottling, the remaining yeast in the beer are typically pretty stressed, especially for higher alcohol beers, and the higher the alcohol, the more inhospitable environment for further propagation/fermentation required to carbonate the beer, whether or not you introduce additional fresh bottling yeast. Since my understanding is that dextrose is even more digestible by beer yeast than sucrose, under these conditions I choose to use dextrose. But again, I do that because it has worked well for me and if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it as far as I am concerned. The additional cost for dextrose isn’t a big concern for me - it’s still very inexpensive per batch. However, if I didn’t have any on hand, I would have no problem bottling with table sugar as a substitute.

another article, from 1995, expressing that some people might attribute a cidery flavor in lightly hopped beers from bottle priming with table sugar.

http://www.brewery.org/library/YPrimerMH.html

also found this:
Dextrose has no dextrines in it. Dextrose is just a fancier name for glucose. It is 100% fermentable and requires no extra processing by the yeast.

Table sugar is Sucrose. Sucrose is a combined molecule of one glucose and one fructose. While glucose is prefentially fermented over fructose in most conditions; both are completely fermentable. Invertase is an enzyme within yeast cells that breaks the sucrose apart into glucose and fructose.

Lastly, both glucose and fructose are more rapidly fermentable than maltose.

http://www.brewingkb.com/homebrewing/De ... -4122.html

Habit, or misinformation.

I started using table sugar at the beginning of the year. My beers carb much more consistently and there are no off flavors. Almost every other countries beer have table sugars in the recipes to lower the FG of their recipes. None of those beers have cider off flavors.

I’m so sweet, I just dip my little finger in the bottling bucket. I used to use my ring finger, but I ended up with bottle bombs.

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