Success

MY first all grain golden ale was way better than I expected. Better than any of the brewery ales
I buy in a growler. No shit. I thought I was going to be knocked by mediocre sanitary and lousy sparging
but it was right on. Half way to a pale ale really with just enough Cascade and that 1056 really is a perfect yeast for an ale like this. Dont know when I will do another batch but I like the sugar priming
and will do half bottles next time and give them a full month. I kegged this and poured it on the 12 day.
Could have used another week but no complaints.
Is the dry yeast equivalent to 1056 as good?. Its very clear that yeast makes a huge difference.
My extract batches 20 years ago sucked compared to this.
I used a little medium crystal only in the sparge…next time the light 10% crystal will be good enough.
A little wheat will be good too some batch down the line.
I am truly surprised.

Hey Congrats!
To answer your Q, dry US-05 is thought to be equivalent to WY1056. I’ve seen a few posts where some of the experts with better palates than me can tell a difference, but for us mokes, they are the same.

Congratulations on your first all grain. Its really the only way to go, taking the grain through the mashing process is making beer, extract is just cooking IMO. 20 years ago you couldnt get the yeast that is available today and like you said that makes a big difference. I’ll have beer at a pub to be social but I much more prefer sitting on my front porch drinking my own

Congrats! Not only are 1056 and US05 similar; the dry yeast US05 is SO MUCH easier to use. No starter, just sprinkle on top and watch it go to work. It is especially helpful when doing much larger batches (10-25 gal)

Now we will be in another re-hydrate the yeast debate :smiley:

Seriously, I have about given up using 1056 because US05 is so good and easy to use. I also just sprinkle it on top and off it goes. Much easier than making enough starter for 20 gallons.

I very rarely make a starter except for a new strain. I save and repitch slurry. No wash method. I just slosh around the trub and pour into two quart mason jars leaving the heavy stuff behind. Now I’ll have enough yeast for two 5gallon batches, just warm and serve. US 05 and 34/70 are two great dry yeasts

Now we will be in another re-hydrate the yeast debate :smiley:

Seriously, I have about given up using 1056 because US05 is so good and easy to use. I also just sprinkle it on top and off it goes. Much easier than making enough starter for 20 gallons.[/quote]

I have only used dry yeast a couple times when i was doing extract batches. Now that im on all grain i like the idea of using dry yeast sounds alot easier and from what you guys are telling me is this your only go to yeast 1056 or US05 in all of your Beers I brew 10 gal Batches Thanks!!

You can make a ton of beers with that yeast. Save your slurry and just keep repitching.

Now we will be in another re-hydrate the yeast debate :smiley:

Seriously, I have about given up using 1056 because US05 is so good and easy to use. I also just sprinkle it on top and off it goes. Much easier than making enough starter for 20 gallons.[/quote]

I have only used dry yeast a couple times when i was doing extract batches. Now that im on all grain i like the idea of using dry yeast sounds alot easier and from what you guys are telling me is this your only go to yeast 1056 or US05 in all of your Beers I brew 10 gal Batches Thanks!![/quote]
I only use 1056 or US05 in American style ales or any beer that does not need or should not have a signature from the yeast. Belgian style and Wiezens are a couple of beers that come to mind that the yeast has a huge impact on the flavor. I just kegged a wheat beer that was 15 gallons with Fermentis wb-06 (wheat beer) and 5 gallons US05 just to see how different they would be. So far the wb-06 has [quote]subtle estery and phenol flavor notes typical of wheat beers[/quote] as promised. Waiting for the 05 to carbonate.