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Styles that can ferment at 75-80?

Temp control is not something I mess with normally. Living in the temperate Pacific NW, I can find a place cool enough in my house/basement to ferment the styles I like without having to resort to temperature modification. I am helping my brother through his first couple of brews, but he lives in Philadelphia, where even his basement doesn’t get below the low 70s this time of year.

Are there certain styles he could brew without using a swamp cooler or modifying a fridge into a fermentation chamber? I was thinking some Belgian styles or perhaps a hefeweizen, but don’t those have to start cool and then are allowed to warm up?

Eventually, he will need to invest in a fermentation chamber, but I started him out with all grain and I would like him to get more comfortable with all that entails before adding more equipment/complexity to his brewing.

Saison is the only style I know of that would come out good in that range. It’s all about the yeast, and saison strains work pretty well there. The mash bill almost doesn’t matter with that style - whatever you brew it will taste like saison due to all the phenolics thrown off by the yeast.

Yup, saison. I plan on brewing one this weekend and just letting the temp crank as high as it wants to go. It will be kind of nice not having to worry about keeping it under 70.

I don’t know of any yeast that will produce really good results if you pitch it that warm. But many/most will be fine finishing fermentation at that temp.

Type swamp cooler into the search at the top of the page here. It might help get his temps into a better range. Lots of us here use them as an easy and inexpensive way to get the fermentation temps lower.

Good advice from Mark. I can keep 5 gallons in the mid to high 50’s easily in my swamp cooler (laundry sink). Almost any deep plastic tub that is a little bigger than your bucket/carboy will do.

:cheers:
Ron

No yeast will output desirable beer if you start it at those kind of temps, not even a saison. Try putting some frozen water bottles around it and wrap it in a few towels. Do this for the first 72 hours after fermentation begins, and then you can let it free-rise to ambient temp.

I agree. Start cool (below 70) for 72 hours and then let the temp rise. I let my saisons with WL 565 go up to 90 degrees in my garage, and they come out great. WL 530 and WY 3711 make nice blond ales at 78 degrees which is the temp I keep the house in the summer.

I disagree that you can throw any recipe together and call it saison. Saison is a very broad style, but I don’t thinks some of the toasty malts work well with the complexity of some Belgian yeasts. Do a little research on the saisons or blond ales that you like to drink and then come up with a recipe.

Just heard Stan Hieronymus speaking about this at NHC. His words of wisdom were to always start around 62.

I think he wrote the same in Brew like a Monk. Something some of us have difficulty doing and the reason for brewing Belgian styles that typically ferment warmer. Due to a cooler than usual mid to late spring my last two have been able to start much closer to that range so hoping for a couple of nice ones.

Oh and I just love Belgian beer :lol:

+1 to everyone else who said NOTHING.

dont beleive that saison crap of people fermenting at 80-90 degrees, you get plenty of saison ester at normal temps and actually decent beer

[quote=“grainbelt”]+1 to everyone else who said NOTHING.

dont beleive that saison crap of people fermenting at 80-90 degrees, you get plenty of saison ester at normal temps and actually decent beer[/quote]

Depends on the strain of saison yeast. Some of them do need to get really warm to finish. But none of them benefit from being pitched at higher temps.

[quote=“Denny”][quote=“grainbelt”]+1 to everyone else who said NOTHING.

dont beleive that saison crap of people fermenting at 80-90 degrees, you get plenty of saison ester at normal temps and actually decent beer[/quote]

Depends on the strain of saison yeast. Some of them do need to get really warm to finish. But none of them benefit from being pitched at higher temps.[/quote]

I have never found a need to go above 70 maybe 75 after fermentation on any saison yeast and achieve desirable flavors and attenuation

[quote=“grainbelt”][quote=“Denny”][quote=“grainbelt”]+1 to everyone else who said NOTHING.

dont beleive that saison crap of people fermenting at 80-90 degrees, you get plenty of saison ester at normal temps and actually decent beer[/quote]

Depends on the strain of saison yeast. Some of them do need to get really warm to finish. But none of them benefit from being pitched at higher temps.[/quote]

I have never found a need to go above 70 maybe 75 after fermentation on any saison yeast and achieve desirable flavors and attenuation[/quote]

I’m taking the word of saison expert Drew Beechum. IIRC, it was WY3724 that can benefit from finishing in the 80s. But I won’t swear to that til I double check with him.

[quote]

I’m taking the word of saison expert Drew Beechum. IIRC, it was WY3724 that can benefit from finishing in the 80s. But I won’t swear to that til I double check with him.[/quote]

I have used that at 70-75 and you needs patience but it has always finished

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