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Spencer Trappist Brewery article - BYO

Saw this on Facebook this morning. Nice read a recipe to boot (extract and all-grain):

http://byo.com/stories/issue/item/2986- ... -trappists

This is way cool, I read another article a while back about these guys. What I liked best was the enthusiasm they all had about just doing it for one, but also doing it in the U.S.A. in the centuries old Trappist tradition. GO FATHERS!!

Agreed, very cool story! I just brewed a batch of Patersbier, and I gave out a few bottles to my coworkers yesterday. I was having a hard time describing the style to them, so I just forwarded this article to each of them today. They do a better job of describing it than I do!

I’m planning to brew patersbier tomorrow. Thought maybe I’d give this AG recipe a try but it says 10 lbs of American 2 Row Pilsner. Do you think they used 2 row rather than a continental pilsner malt?

After reading about how they wanted everything just right, I’d say they used the continental pils. It seems I read where the Belgian monks used their local, which probably was Castle or Dingmans. Simple recipes need primo ingredients, there’s nothing to hide behind. Tell us how it turns out Danny, I really like this stuff. I made it dry and subtle using WLP 515 [ Antwerp ] @ 65 deg.

Looks like they use American 2 row. This is off their website.

“The “Spencer Malt Mix” is a proprietary blend of 2 row and 6 row malted barley varieties carefully selected to meet physical and nutritional requirements for optimal brewing of our Trappist ale. A caramel Munich specialty malt from Wisconsin adds color and body to our ale. On September 26, 2013 we planted our first field of barley at the monastery and we plan to collaborate with a local craft malter when our barley harvest meets the quality standards for brewing.”

I’ve made the NB Patersbier before using 3787. It’s a great summer session beer.

Yeah, I just noticed that too about American varieties. All I have is the European stuff, so I’ll give it a go pretty soon trying 3787/530 and play it against the one I have with 515. I’ll change the hops since I used Sterling on the first one.

I really enjoyed that article. That issue of BYO is among the better ones and worth picking up if you’re not a subscriber.

Being somewhat of a noob when it comes to All-Grain I have a question regarding this recipe. I have all of the ingredients and was inspired by the article. I really want to give this a try. My problem is that I mash in a 10 Gallon Round Igloo with a SS Braid. This recipe calls for a Mash rest at 148 for 75 minutes then raising the temperature to 162 for 15 minutes.

Since I am using the cooler mash tun should I just Mash at 148 for as long as I can hold and then lauter? Would it be best to do a single infusion mash at a bit higher temperature? Or should I hold the mash at 148 for 75 minutes and then trying adding 5 or 6 quarts of really hot (195 degree) water to get the grain up to 162?

Anyone have any thoughts on this? Thank you in advance.

They use American malts “from Wisconsin”. I assume Briess.

They also definitely use one of the Trappist yeasts, WLP500 or 530 or somewhere in there. They’re just not saying which one. But they do say it’s from one of the other monasteries.

I ended up doing a simpler patersbier with 10 lbs of pils I had around. Maybe I’ll brew this one when that patersbier is done fermenting and just use the cake of 3787 for this.

Doug I’ll likely just mash at 151 or so for 60 minutes. I’ve brewed the above mentioned patersbier a couple times and brewed a Belgian dark strong last year. I didn’t do a step mash on any of them.

Thanks for the input Danny. That is what I will do. The brew session is planned for next weekend so I will keep you posted on how it turns out. It is my first Belgian style since a Saison Disaster 2 years ago.

So I brewed this up 3 weeks back. My LHBS did not have enough pilsner malt so I went with:

10# Briess 2 Row
2 # Briess 6 Row
4 oz CaraMunich 60L
.5 oz Nugget
.25 oz Willamette
Irish Moss
Wyeast 3787 with 1.5 liter starter

I was aiming for 151 degree mash but something must have been off with my Beer Smith calculation and at dough in I was only at 148. I added 2 quarts of left over strike water but that didn’t do much. So I figured I would check conversion after 60 minutes and possibly hold mash longer. It seems like I lost a few degrees over the course of the hour mash so I let it go 15 minutes more. Boiled 60 minutes and then transferred to ferment. OG was 1.057. Hit it with oxygen and let the yeast do their thing. It was a very active fermentation and I kept it at 68 for one week and then let it rise. Took a hydrometer sample last night and it has a FG is at 1.005! I know I mash low but I wasn’t expecting that. The sample was nice and dry with a slight fruity undertone from the yeast. So far it is not a bad Belgian ale despite the crazy attenuation. It has a pretty nice color as well. It is pretty clear so I will check gravity again tonight and then keg. Fingers crossed.

most mediocre Belgian-inspired beers I have had have not been dry enough. I think you are on the right track. Beer porn (pics) when you get it carbed and served, please. :cheers:

3787 is a beast. I just brewed a patersbier with it. 5.25 gals in a 6.5 gal carboy blew thru the blow off hose and filled a 2 qt container of starsan with kreusen and over flowed onto the floor. All at 63 degrees. Kreusen stayed in the neck when I let it rise to 72. I didn’t get the attenuation you did. OG 1.054, FG 1.008 but the yeast didn’t slack off either.

Keep us posted on how that beer develops.

[quote=“dannyboy58”]3787 is a beast. I just brewed a patersbier with it. 5.25 gals in a 6.5 gal carboy blew thru the blow off hose and filled a 2 qt container of starsan with kreusen and over flowed onto the floor. All at 63 degrees. Kreusen stayed in the neck when I let it rise to 72. I didn’t get the attenuation you did. OG 1.054, FG 1.008 but the yeast didn’t slack off either.

Keep us posted on how that beer develops.[/quote]

You’re not kidding about that 3787. I’ve brewed a couple of patersbiers and a tripel with it and it chewed through them all with a vengeance. I kegged a patersbier a couple of weeks ago and, as a matter of fact, I’m enjoying it as I type. I think it started at about 1.048 or so and finished at 1.009. It has the classic banana/clove profile with just enough hopping to balance it out, and just a touch of dryness. And I tell ya, this stuff goes great with food!

Great article! I think traditionally Trappist monks brewed with local ingredients. Also known as whatever you had on hand. So it would sort of be true to style for them to use U.S. malts because that is what is on hand. Hard to tell if they are growing barley to really use in their beer or to qualify to be a Massachusetts Farmer Brewery.

I am surprised not to see any sugar in the recipe. It would allow it to finish drier or what the Trappist might say have more drinkability. I have a Trappist clone going right now with Wyeast 3787 so there will be plenty for use soon so I copied the recipe. Have to think about adding some sugar to it. BTW the 3787 blew the stoppers out of four out of five carboys even though there should have been plenty of head room.

I enjoyed this beer for quite a few weeks (months.) It was a fairly simple grain bill and hop schedule that allowed the yeast to shine through. It was a bit fruity due to the yeast at first but I let it age in the keg for a while and it really peaked. I would recommend the recipe. I will try again with Pilsner malt to see the difference.

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