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Sparge Water

I’m seeing a lot of Q & A on strike water, and mashing ratios. What about sparge water? Is it customary to heat the same amount? or, do you just use enough to make 6 to 6.5 pre-boil volume? I ask because I’m going to do my very first AG brew, a Belgian Wit this weekend. Thanks

Oh, I’m planning on doing a batch sparge. At least this time.

Paul

My recommendation is to read Denny’s Cheap and Easy Batch Sparge Brewing page first.

http://hbd.org/cascade/dennybrew/

I also have a nice little calculator on my web site to calculate mash and sparge water.

http://gnipsel.com/beer/software/beer-software.html

John

[quote=“johnplctech”]My recommendation is to read Denny’s Cheap and Easy Batch Sparge Brewing page first.

http://hbd.org/cascade/dennybrew/

I also have a nice little calculator on my web site to calculate mash and sparge water.

http://gnipsel.com/beer/software/beer-software.html

John[/quote]

I use the Step Mash spreadsheet every time I brew. Thanks for that!

I would always heat more water than you think you will need. That goes for strike water as well as sparge water. I like to dough in and then add more water until I hit my number. I then like to sparge until I reach my volume. It is just easier to have a little extra water rather than trying to heat some more up because you came up short on temp or volume.

I also batch sparge. What I do is plan my amounts for strike and sparge. I heat both up at the same time, usually by dough in time my sparge water is boiling. If I need to increase/adjust temp on the mash I just grab some sparge water and toss that in. That way I don’t end up with too much going in to my boil kettle and having to try and boil off extra. Beersmith has a pretty good water calculater as well.

I fly sparge and typically use this procedure for a 7.5/8g(ale)-8.5/9g(lager) preboil kettle collection depending on boil length- 6.50 gallon post boil-5.25g into fermentor batch:
7 gallons tap
Add crushed campden
Acidify PH to under 6.0
Warm to 185f and pump to 10 gallon cooler HLT. I then see a sparging temp of 170 as the water is typically in the HLT for 30-45 minutes before sparge.

Some bigger batches I use all 7 gallons to lauter, some batches I could have used 4 as I have water remaining after I cut last runnings. I find it best to always have the extra 1-3 around warmed, what the heck, cant hurt right.

I use pro-mash to calculate how much water I will need. I will usually use 1.5qts/lbs in my strike water. When I get into larger grain bills where the sparge water falls below 4 gallons (or so), I adust my qts/lb ratio to try and increase my sparge water amount. IMO it helps keep my efficiency up. I have read on forum’s that some people split the strike and sparge water evenly as long as the strike water is between 1 to 2 qts/lb.

[quote=“paultuttle”] What about sparge water?

… do you just use enough to make 6 to 6.5 pre-boil volume? I

Paul[/quote]

This^^^.

Let’s assume your first running is 2.5 gallons and you want 6.5 gallons pre-boil, then:

total amount desired - first running = sparge, or 6.5 - 2.5 = 4.0 sparge. easy peasy.

your grain will have already absorbed as much as it’s going to so no need to worry about additional loss to absorption.

cheers

Stormy I’m sure what you just mentioned is on for batch sparging I wouldn’t know as I have never looked at the method really, just bits and pieces. The thing is though you brought back to my attention an aspect that could be huge for the OP which is this:

You will have dead space in your kettle from hot-cold protein breaks that could be .25 gal to 2 gal
etc…and you will lose on average a gallon an hour from boiloff. So lets look at it this way shall we>>>>

Using myself as an example I find that depending on hop load I will lose .75-1.25 gallon on average to protein break and hop etc material in the bottom of the kettle after chilling. I have a dip tube and other but I will start picking up tons of trub so therefore I found that if I start my boil with 7.5 gallons for a 60 minute boil. I will boil off 1 gallon to evap and lose .25 gallon to chilling so I’m down to 6.25 gallons remaining and will lose on average 1 gallon to trub after whirl-pooling. So I am left with 5.25 gallons of crystal clear wort running off to fermentor.

6.25 gallons is the amount I always base the recipe SG/ IBU formulation on also.

YRMV of course as you will need to see what these numbers actually are during a few preliminary brews, but its one thing to consider pre-1st batch for higher incident of hitting all numbers first time out of the gate. :cheers:

YRMV of course as you will need to see what these numbers actually are during a few preliminary brews, but its one thing to consider pre-1st batch for higher incident of hitting all numbers first time out of the gate. :cheers: [/quote]

I will, thanks. I’ve received a lot of really good advice here. I’ll be making my starter tomorrow for Saturday’s brew. I’ll post how it went.

Paul

[quote=“ITsPossible”]Stormy I’m sure what you just mentioned is on for batch sparging I wouldn’t know as I have never looked at the method really, just bits and pieces. The thing is though you brought back to my attention an aspect that could be huge for the OP which is this:

You will have dead space in your kettle from hot-cold protein breaks that could be .25 gal to 2 gal
etc…and you will lose on average a gallon an hour from boiloff. So lets look at it this way shall we>>>>

Using myself as an example I find that depending on hop load I will lose .75-1.25 gallon on average to protein break and hop etc material in the bottom of the kettle after chilling. I have a dip tube and other but I will start picking up tons of trub so therefore I found that if I start my boil with 7.5 gallons for a 60 minute boil. I will boil off 1 gallon to evap and lose .25 gallon to chilling so I’m down to 6.25 gallons remaining and will lose on average 1 gallon to trub after whirl-pooling. So I am left with 5.25 gallons of crystal clear wort running off to fermentor.

6.25 gallons is the amount I always base the recipe SG/ IBU formulation on also.

YRMV of course as you will need to see what these numbers actually are during a few preliminary brews, but its one thing to consider pre-1st batch for higher incident of hitting all numbers first time out of the gate. :cheers: [/quote]

I’m not saying any of my numbers are magic, just an example. As you’ve said above, much thought goes in to detemining pre-boil so you can get the appropriate post boil. Lots of variables.

But the math for determining sparge, for batch sparge, is very simple as I noted above, once you’ve determined how much you want your total pre-boil volume to be…which takes into account your system: grain/water ration, grain absorption rate, boil-off rate, boil time, etc.

cheers.

+1 to Stormy. I buy my water so I only heat exactly what I use. Saves a little propane too.
:cheers:

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