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So what next?

I am drinking a Pale I brewed, have a chocolate spiced brown ale fermenting, so what should I try next?

Old Ale, Amber Ale, ESB, Mild Stout…

Mr. Octabird
American Made!

Only you can decide.

That’s like asking us what you should have for supper.

Not to be blunt, but nobody really cares but yourself.

Brew what you like to drink!

Now if you have certain restrictions like money, ingredients, or if you’re entering a certain contest, etc… then maybe some suggestions could be offered.

Well I just started, so I was looking for ideas that I could have turn out well.
Thanks for harshing my mellow.

Mr. Octabird
American Made!

Winter is my favorite time to brew. Maybe try a Dunkelweizen or Weizenbock. Something that will warm the coming chilli days and nights ahead.

If you go out and buy supplies for every batch, then you can brew anything that fits your ability to have temp control during fermentation.

ris

I think I am going to do an Amber Ale, followed by a reworked version of my first Pale Mild, and then try an Old Ale. Something like Samuel Smith’s Winter Welcome Ale.
I was thinking a Bock would be good to try next August for fall/winter enjoyment.

Mr. Octabird
American Made!

One of my favorites is American Amber Ale.

What I would do is brew the styles you like. If after tasting your beer your not saying “wow I have to brew this again” then tweak the recipe and brew it again. Work your way down the list and pretty soon you will have a bunch of recipes of your own to choose from. Another thing To do is try to remember the last beer you bought that you really, I mean really enjoyed, then see if you can find a recipe for it.

I just did a clone (extract though) of Sam Adams Old Fezziweg that I found online. It’s a good winter beer. It’s in the primary right now, chugging along since Sunday. Should be aged well after Thanksgiving and into the winter months. I’m pretty excited!

Make sure you keep good notes for reference later[ times, temps, ingredients etc:]. Probably think I’m nuts but I love “Old Fezziwig”. Should make it for Christmas.

[quote=“Octabird”]I think I am going to do an Amber Ale, followed by a reworked version of my first Pale Mild, and then try an Old Ale. Something like Samuel Smith’s Winter Welcome Ale.
I was thinking a Bock would be good to try next August for fall/winter enjoyment.

Mr. Octabird
American Made![/quote]

Try repeating something you’ve brewed before (and liked) with ONE minor change. That’s a good way to identify the effect of changes in mashing temps, hop schedule, yeast, fermentation schedule, water treatment, or one of the many other changes you see recommended on this forum.

To your first question, ANY beer can turn out well, if you brew it well.

I would echo the prior sentiments and add to them: If you can force yourself, take 6 months of brewing, and brew BORING beer. Doesn’t sound like you like to brew them, but no Double Peanut Butter Chocolate Imperial Belgian Porters for now.

Buy Brewing Classic Styles. Brew the recipes in there. Even styles you haven’t tried. Learn to brew them well.

I took one year of brewing and brewed simple, what some would call ‘boring’ beers. It was the best thing I have done to make better beer, second maybe to temp control and yeast management. I don’t think I will be brewing a 70/- again any time soon, but I brewed a good one during my year of boring beer. Learn to taste, judge, evaluate, and diagnose problems, then improve them.

If you REALLY want someone to tell you what to do, brew the ESB or even a premium bitter. Awesome for football Sundays.

Most of all, enjoy. :cheers:

Hey Pietro, could I get the recipe for that Double Peanut Butter Chocolate Imperial Belgian Porter ?

Well I am going to do a 3 gallon Amber next weekend. Then not sure what is next.

Mr. Octabird
American Made!

Another thing you can do is look through the BJCP guides and see if anything interests you.

Yes!

A Promash Recipe Report
5.5 gallons
OG 1.080

-12 lbs Crystal 120
-2 lbs chocolate malt
-1 lb Maris Otter
-1 lb Special B
-1 lb Shur-Fine Peanut Butter (mash)

1oz cascade (the cleaner, not the hops) @ 60 minutes
0.5 lb Shur-Fine Peanut Butter (flameout)
2oz hershey’s syrup (flameout)
1 vial WLP 500, fermented at 75*

Tasting notes: aromatic notes of raisins cooked over high heat in a cast iron pan with no oil, and a soussant of 10-W30. Finish is similar to Popov vodka. Mouthfeel resembles Draino.

Awesome. I’ll send you a bottle for you to judge

[quote=“Octabird”]…so what should I try next?
Old Ale, Amber Ale, ESB, Mild Stout…
[/quote]

Old Ale would be a very good choice, provided that you are patient enough, and have ample stock of other beers to enjoy during the long aging stage.

I brew a 70/- almost every year - there is nothing boring about them, just an easy drinking beer that goes down great in early fall weather. Just kegged one a couple weeks ago.

To the larger question though, I think Pietro is exactly right, even if he uses “boring” when he should be labeling these beers “simple” or “straightforward”. Brew a bunch of simple beers, and brew several batches of the same beer several times in a row to really learn how to control your system. I got pretty sick of Wit after brewing three batches in a row some years ago, but my beers got far more consistent after that.

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