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Slowly Raising the Temperature?

In the book, “Brewing Classic Styles”, for the recipe for “Strict Observance Tripel”, the authors talk about starting fermentation at 64 degrees and then let “the temperature rise slowly through the course of fermentation.”

This sounds great, but I’m wondering what this really means from a practical application perspective.

We brewed and pitched yeast last night, and it has now fermented 1 day at 64. Should I up the temperature a degree per day for a week? Or something else?

Anyone have a schedule I should follow?

Fermentingly Yours,

JW :cheers:

I think the traditional way is to pitch the yeast and lit it rip wide open.
Not applying so much cooling that the temp remains a certain degree,
But like you say, slowly rising. You don’t want to let it blast off at 70* because it will gover the top for sure, but you don’t want t get into a situation where you try to cool it back down either, some strains can crash and stall in a sugar boosted wort.
But they have been brewing the same beer for hundreds of years,
And so consistently that they know what temp to pitch at so that they get a constant rise in temperature right up to hitting terminal gravity without going over the top.
Probably 75* right at the end to keep the old tired yeast moving and happy.

[quote=“Scott Miller”]I think the traditional way is to pitch the yeast and lit it rip wide open.
Not applying so much cooling that the temp remains a certain degree,
But like you say, slowly rising. You don’t want to let it blast off at 70* because it will gover the top for sure, but you don’t want t get into a situation where you try to cool it back down either, some strains can crash and stall in a sugar boosted wort.
But they have been brewing the same beer for hundreds of years,
And so consistently that they know what temp to pitch at so that they get a constant rise in temperature right up to hitting terminal gravity without going over the top.
Probably 75* right at the end to keep the old tired yeast moving and happy.[/quote]

So, up to 75 is something I could easily shoot for. My simple mind says just up in one degree each day for 10 days and I’ll be there. Does that sound reasonable?

1 degree / day sounds good, but in practice, very difficult. As it begins to ferment, it will increase in temp quickly: 5+ degrees in 24 hours in not unheard of.

Personally, I’d do everything I could to keep it near the mid 60s knowing it will increase in temp during normal fermentation.

:cheers:

I would let it sit at 64 for 2-3 days. Then start your climb. Let the majority of the sugars be consumed at the lower temp. Then raise the temp to help get all the sugars converted.

I usually do 5-7 days in the low to mid 60s then stop temp control and let it go where it wants to go.

I must be way overpitching because my 9-10%ers hit FG in 3-4 days.
Keep em in a pretty cool basement, pitch at 65*,
After 24 hours of temp control,then off, they can’t make it to 70* in 3 days.
I would like to try pitching at 60* and just letting it go,
I think with my ambient temp it wouldn’t get over 75,
But that thought of stalling one past the point of revival keeps me from trying.
I do wonder if the flavor profile would be any different .

I follow something similar to Denny, 3-4 days in the temp controlled fridge wherever I want it, and then after that I pull it out of the fridge to let it rise to whatever to both act as a d-rest and promote attenuation. Seems to work really well. If the OG is high, I’ll let the temp control stay on longer, maybe 6-8 days or so.

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