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Safety Ground for Rolling Brew Rig

My brew rig is on wheels, therefore isolated even further from Mother Earth. I am about to add a circuit to control (manual on/off) my recirculation pump and chiller water pump. As you can see in the circuit diagram, it is a simple switched outlet pair. The recirculation pump is bolted directly to the frame. The other pump is a submersible pool pump that is grounded via it’s power cord, and when in use is in the swimming pool. The switch and outlet boxes are plastic. Right now I do not have any other electrical components on this brew rig. So - I plan to tie the rig input power cord ground directly to the rig frame with a metal to metal connection. Here is a picture of my brew rig, without the pump switches and outlets installed yet. Any suggestions or issues that you guys see with this? Thanks in advance, and cheers!

I’m too distracted by the sunshine and blue skies in your picture to give any meaningful advice. The skies here are the grayish white of a well worn t-shirt and the birds are huddled together for warmth. Connect all the grounds to a metal stake that drive into the ground. GFI on everything

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Yes the weather here in Las Vegas has been amazing. Not many days in January or February when the temperature fell below 55F except at night. Lots of sunshine. Today the high will be 70F and sunny. Summer will be upon us with a vengeance in a few months, but I will have cold beer and a swimming pool to take my mind off that. haha.

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I made a very similar switch box for my old home made brew stand with a double gang box. One side was the switch the other an outlet. Made it possible to turn off the power at the end. I don’t need it for brewing any longer but it is still very helpful around the house.

The old stand was Neanderthal compared to yours BTW.

My main source is a 220 GFCI… And it works fine. Sneezles61

I’d have to pull out my copy of the NEC, but I’d definitely tie your green wire ground to the to the brew rig. If not you could risk a difference of potential and risk being shocked. I’d also use two GFCI outlets vs the single outlet for safety reasons.

Thanks Olanwade. I did install this with the green ground wire hard-connected/bare metal to the rig frame. I am also using a GFCI protected circuit to supply rig power. BTW, I worked for GD in Fort Worth for 10 years back in the late 80s and early 90s.

Small world. I was with Motorola when Moto sold our division to GD. I worked with some of the GD FTW folks years ago.

My controller hangs on the wall… I have cords running to my element and my pump. On the trial run… I was spraying all about the base of my rolling stand… Some of the spray deflected and tripped the GFCI 220 breaker… Before I reset it, I took all my corded connections apart and couldn’t see any moisture… Perhaps the initial instant shorting caused it to vaporize? I don’t know… I have assurance… it’s properly grounded/protected. If in doubt, you could set your meter to 400 volts and start testing… frame to earth, your connections to frame/earth to see if it trips…
Isn’t electricity just a theory anyways?
Sneezles61

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If we stuck with Edisons original plan instead of Westinghouses we wouldn’t have these problems :wink:

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DC instead of AC? Thought that was Tesla’s thinnin’ bubba Louie… AC I mean…
Sneezles61

Yes Edison’s wireless power would be cool. But would there still be a grounding issue, and would you have to make sure not to wear any kind of “antenna” that might “receive” that power. Haha.

Tesla invented both AC and wireless power transmission. He was a better inventor than Edison but not as good a businessman. Therefore everyone knows Edison and few know Tesla.

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But, Edison doesn’t have a car named after him :slight_smile:

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Yes but Tesla doesn’t have a town in NJ named for him. :slight_smile:

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