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Safale US05 yeast

Fermentis gives a rather vague recommendation on pitch temp and a range of 59f-75f ferm. temp. What pitch temp and ferm. temp would be best for say, Smashing Pumpkin Ale? Thanks

Low 60’s would be ideal. Cheers.

Not really vague. 05 ferments well anywhere within that range in my experience. Recently brewed a recipe with a similar grist profile similar to smashing pumpkin. Pitched one rehydrated pack into 1.062 wort at 62f and saw fermentation within 18 hours. Fermented from 62 ramping to 68 finished in 10 days.

Toccatta,
Fermentis says you can pitch directly into wort if it is over 68F so I pitched at 83F. That was yesterday. Today it is in the garage where air temp is 70F. The bubbler lock is going like crazy. Should I have pitched cooler and monitored the wort temp instead of air temp? I used a sink of ice to chill this partial mash batch because I hate my Therminater and haven’t got an immersion chiller yet. Thanks

Not to worry. Just keep an eye on it, your yeast may finish more quickly than expected.

As to the “shoulda, coulda, woulda”, try a gravity sample when it’s done and see what you think. The “party line” says to pitch slightly below ferment temps for yeast health. The problem with this is that every strain’s flavor profile varies with fermentation temperature. It may very well be that 05 tastes best for your application at higher temps.

I use 05 most often when I want either a sharper beer or a less yeast character so I typically keep it cool. It’s fine starting at 62. In my experience, yeast labs are pretty conservative with the low end of pitch temps as their primary concern is yeast growth while beer flavor is secondary.

[quote=“1tun”]Toccatta,
Fermentis says you can pitch directly into wort if it is over 68F so I pitched at 83F. That was yesterday. Today it is in the garage where air temp is 70F. The bubbler lock is going like crazy. Should I have pitched cooler and monitored the wort temp instead of air temp? I used a sink of ice to chill this partial mash batch because I hate my Therminater and haven’t got an immersion chiller yet. Thanks[/quote]

Just for future reference, pitching at 83, and then going into an ambient of 70, is WAY too hot. The beer is probably going to have a lot of fruitiness, and maybe even some headache inducing fusel alcohols. As a rule of thumb, most ales should be kept in the low 60s, and remember that during active fermentation beer can be several degrees higher than its environment. Yeast will happily ferment at much warmer temperatures, but that doesn’t mean they make optimal beer.

As for this beer, because you pitched plenty of yeast (dry yeast has a higher cell count than liquid) and you pitched so warm, fermentation activity is going to be over very quickly. You may well be at final gravity in a day or two. Don’t think that means its “done” though. You want to give the yeast time to clean up after itself, especially since it probably produced some off flavors early on. I would give it at least a couple weeks beyond when gravity is stable.

Don’t feel bad, you’ve made beer, and it may even turn out pretty good. Back when I lived in Oklahoma, I fermented ALL of my beer in the 70s, because that was the typical temperature in my house and I didn’t understand the importance of temp control. I still made some pretty good beer. But in the long run you will be much happier with the results when you keep temperatures lower.

Very informative, Nate. Just the answer I was looking for. If I understand you correctly, You would have pitched and fermented in the low 60’s, right? Thanks

Yup. Ideally, for a “clean” ale you want BEER temperature to be in the lower end of the sixties. Your beer can be warmer than the room, especially during active fermentation. If you have one of those stick on thermometers, those are a reasonably accurate indication of actual beer (rather than room) temperature. It just so happens I made a beer very similar to smashing pumpkin just a couple weeks a go, and I also used US05. Fermentation temperature ended up being about 64deg, and this was sitting on the cold concrete floor of my 60deg basement. I will probably keg it this coming weekend. I’ll go straight from primary to keg, no secondary.

For a fruitier ale, you might want more like upper sixties. For some belgians or saisons, you might want 70s or even (in a very few circumstances) 80s. It depends on the style and the yeast. When in doubt though, low 60s is almost always a safe bet.

Not to nitpick, but even on Belgian inspired beers (including saisons), you want to pitch in the mid sixties (at the highest) then let the temp of the fermenter (not ambient) come up slowly during fermentation up into the 70’s. I have had way to many homebrewed “belgians” that are way too estery and a mess of fusels. This can be avoided and you can achieve the right profile by ramping the temp up and keeping it cool early on.

Also, to the OP - while you did pitch warm, this is probably a style where esters will work…the spices will hopefully balance out the fruit and hopefully the fusels. Just give it some extra time, maybe 3-4 weeks primary.

[quote=“Nate42”]Just for future reference, pitching at 83, and then going into an ambient of 70, is WAY too hot. The beer is probably going to have a lot of fruitiness, and maybe even some headache inducing fusel alcohols. As a rule of thumb, most ales should be kept in the low 60s, and remember that during active fermentation beer can be several degrees higher than its environment. Yeast will happily ferment at much warmer temperatures, but that doesn’t mean they make optimal beer.
[/quote]

Nonsense. Saison Dupont ferments at 85-95 degrees. If they don’t produce fusels, his lower temp pitch won’t see fusels either. Ester production is irrelevant in this beer as they will be totally overpowered by pumpkin pie spice.

Sure, you can brew any ale yeast in the 60’s and make beer but doing so won’t always produce the beer you’re trying to make.

US-05 and the Dupont strain are two very different yeasts.

Sounds delicious!

[quote=“Toccata”][quote=“Nate42”]Just for future reference, pitching at 83, and then going into an ambient of 70, is WAY too hot. The beer is probably going to have a lot of fruitiness, and maybe even some headache inducing fusel alcohols. As a rule of thumb, most ales should be kept in the low 60s, and remember that during active fermentation beer can be several degrees higher than its environment. Yeast will happily ferment at much warmer temperatures, but that doesn’t mean they make optimal beer.
[/quote]

Nonsense. Saison Dupont ferments at 85-95 degrees. If they don’t produce fusels, his lower temp pitch won’t see fusels either. Ester production is irrelevant in this beer as they will be totally overpowered by pumpkin pie spice.

Sure, you can brew any ale yeast in the 60’s and make beer but doing so won’t always produce the beer you’re trying to make.[/quote]

Um, Saison Dupont is a pretty special case. Also, saison yeast DOES produce fusels, in fact some small quantity of fusels and other high temp byproducts is a part of the characteristic flavor. I’ve made Saison’s where I pitched in the 70s and let it rise to the 80s with great results. That’s hardly standard operating procedure though. US05 is intended to be a clean california ale style yeast. When in doubt, the 60s is where you should go. I haven’t fermented with US05 that hot specifically, but I know from first hand experience on some early failed experiments of mine that fermenting too hot is a great recipe for a fusel-ey headache in a bottle. I’m not saying that’s what the OP is going to get - I think there’s a good chance he ends up with an allright beer. I just think that in the future he would be happier with a lower pitching temp for most standard ales.

[quote=“Toccata”] Nonsense. Saison Dupont ferments at 85-95 degrees. If they don’t produce fusels, his lower temp pitch won’t see fusels either. Ester production is irrelevant in this beer as they will be totally overpowered by pumpkin pie spice.

Sure, you can brew any ale yeast in the 60’s and make beer but doing so won’t always produce the beer you’re trying to make.[/quote]

I don’t think Dupont PITCHES in the 85-95* range. They likely raise it up slowly as active fermentation dies down to dry the beer out. Fusel production typically happens in the growth phase and early active phase IIRC.

According to the brewer, their aim is to finish fermentation as quickly as possible. Given 7 days to complete fermentation, it doesn’t leave much room for a cool pitch and ramp up schedule. Regardless, if they ferment exclusively within the temp band above the yeast are always working at temperatures most home brewers work hard to avoid. And that really is the point, after all.

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