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Questions on my first keg....off flavor?

My first batch was an Irish Red from Midwest (got it as a gift last Christmas) and as my son and I were trying it today he says there is a bit of an “off” flavor. He described it as a “vegetable” taste. It’s not bad but not great either. Still better than Killians. What could cause this off flavor? I pitched the dry yeast right on top of the wort. I don’t think I did a great job of oxygenating the wort, I also wonder about the fermentation process. It started quickly and was over in about 2 days. The beer was a bit cloudy too, but I added knox gelatin to the keg which cleared it up. The beer is about 6 weeks old and actually seemed to taste better about a week ago. Another issue is that I don’t believe my boil wasn’t as vigorous as it should have been.

As a side note I will be using liquid yeast from now on. After reading up on the subject it seems virtually all master brewers (including Palmer) recommend liquid over dry.

Vegetable flavors are usually caused by oxidation or DMS. DMS is caused by covering the kettle during the boil or having a weak boil. You can combat oxidation by limiting splashing AFTER ferm qnd limiting the head space when bottling.

I agree…you possibly picked up oxidation in transferring the finished beer to the keg. Next time, be sure to purge the air out of the keg before filling; if all your other processes were correct, that could help solve the problem.

I did a good job at purging all the air out of the keg. at least 3 purges. I was extremely careful with being sanitary and I have a fermentation chamber so temp control was no issue and I did not cover the pot during the boil. If anything it must have been the weak boil? That is the only thing I can think of.

I believe Loopie and Professor are referencing splashing during the transfer to the keg. Burping the keg is good for the head space. But doesn’t do any O2 that may be in solution from the racking process.

Here is a list of off flavors and their common causes.

http://www.howtobrew.com/section4/chapter21-2.html

Is it more grassy, or more like cooked corn? Or more like cooked cabbage?

[quote=“Nighthawk”]I believe Loopie and Professor are referencing splashing during the transfer to the keg. Burping the keg is good for the head space. But doesn’t do any O2 that may be in solution from the racking process.

Here is a list of off flavors and their common causes.

http://www.howtobrew.com/section4/chapter21-2.html[/quote]

I was also very careful not to splash when I filled keg. I have a batch of oatmeal stout in the secondary (2 weeks old) which I will be kegging this weekend. Also just brewed a batch of the Elevenses which I will keg after 3 weeks as well. I may have kegged the first batch too quickly. I know the recipes say 1 week in primary and 1 week in secondary before bottling but I think an extra week in the secondary doesn’t hurt? I’m reading the Palmer book every evening and learn something new every time I pick it up. My cooking and brew process for the Elevenses seemed perfect although my OG was slightly lower that the recipe said. The wort tasted really good. Hopefully that is an indication the finished product will be good too?

DMS, particularly the rancid vegetable taste/aroma, can & is also a result of poor sanitation. Unfortunately, I’ve had some recent first-hand experience with this. Depending upon the start of the infection, six weeks is enough to ruin some or all of your batch. I’m not saying you have an infection, but it may be something else to check.

If you think it’s an infection… if you want to try, you can see if you can rack a portion from the bottom of your keg to a new container. There’s a chance that the beer below the air-liquid surface may be uncontaminated.

[quote=“Silentknyght”]DMS, particularly the rancid vegetable taste/aroma, can & is also a result of poor sanitation. Unfortunately, I’ve had some recent first-hand experience with this. Depending upon the start of the infection, six weeks is enough to ruin some or all of your batch. I’m not saying you have an infection, but it may be something else to check.

If you think it’s an infection… if you want to try, you can see if you can rack a portion from the bottom of your keg to a new container. There’s a chance that the beer below the air-liquid surface may be uncontaminated.[/quote]

Hi Andrew. I don’t think it’s an infection, but then again I’m brand new to brewing so I’m not sure. THe taste isn’t that bad, like I said in another post it’s better than Killians. I honestly couldn’t really describe it, it’s just a slightly unplesant aftertaste. My son is the one who think it’s got a vege taste. My other son will be home from college tonight and I’ll have him try it as well. They are both beersnobs and only drink the “good” stuff so I really value their opinions.

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