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Problem with Denny's Wry Rye IPA

Brewed this (extract kit) 3 weeks ago. Used the special yeast, made a starter, and the boil was normal. The only problem was that it was really hot that day (95F) so it took a long time for the wort to cool (I brew in the garage and connect my chiller to the outside hose). Wort never got lower than 82F so I racked to the primary, installed an airlock and put it in the basement. A few hours later it was down to 72F (ambiemt basement temp that day). OG was 1.069 which missed the target of 1.078.

I pitched the yeast and next morning I saw the airlock bubbling. That night I saw the krausen was pretty close to blowing off so I installed my blowoff setup. Still normal, yeast was working pretty hard for the next 48 hours. Removed the blowoff and installed a clean airlock.

Now 3 weeks later the fermentation seems stuck at 1.022. The beer itself tastes bad, much more than bitter it seems sour. Did I get an infection? Or could the bad taste be from the high fermentation temps?

I’m really disappointed, not just because I am out $50 but mostly because I love Rye IPA and was looking forward to drinking it. I am ready to dump it down the drain. Any advice?

When I did this kit mine finished around 1.016, which I was told is a little high. When I first kegged it it really seemed bitter so I let it sit for a couple of months so it could mellow out.

If it fermented in the 70s that might have caused the off flavor.

It finishes around 1.015ish for me. Based on your description, you might have an infection.

First of all, you didn’t miss your target OG - because you can’t with an extract batch, unless you botch your volume. You just didn’t mix the top up water thoroughly before the gravity measurement, which doesn’t impact the end product.

You fermented too hot, don’t waste money on more beer kits until you figure out a way to deal with that. Swamp chiller will do the trick. You want the fermenting beer to be in the 60s, and it will rise several degrees above the ambient.

All that said, if its truly sour than as Denny said the real problem is probably an infection. Easy test - give it a few more weeks. If it gets better, it just needed more time. If it gets worse, you’re infected and not much to be done. Give it a while before you dump it just in case. Don’t bother dry hopping until you’ve decided its good.

Are you using a refractometer for you FG reading?

I dont think its infection. Yes sour can be a resulting off flavor/smell from bacterial contamination, but see my lower comment for why I think it is something else and I highly suggest a pause to let this thing condition a bit and see whats up. It may be advisable to rack to another fermentor off the yeast and leave for another few weeks for it to further clear and condition off the yeast then re sample both SG and flavor/aroma then move forward or dump as said above.

The sour he is getting might just be another flavor from a hop profile he has not sampled before, excessive IBU depending on actual AA% in the hops used at this time, fusels, other VDK as result of hot ferment.

If it truly was an infection his FG would be way lower than 1.022 and would continue to ferment well below the estimated ending FG of 1.015.

Thank you all for your insights. I am using a hydrometer to measure the gravity and I do use the temperature correction tables. Also I have successfully brewed perhaps a dozen other beers so I am fairly confident in the reading. With all that the other posters said, I will rack to the secondary and let it condition for a while. I will post the final result later.

Thanks again for the help!

DO NOT rack to secondary, at least not yet. If what it needs is conditioning, leaving it on the yeast will help.

If you want to rack before you dry hop that’s fine, but wait until it tastes good first.

Even easier. In the mean time I will work on the temperature control problem as the outdoor temps are getting into the high 90s this week.

[quote=“Nate42”]DO NOT rack to secondary, at least not yet. If what it needs is conditioning, leaving it on the yeast will help.

If you want to rack before you dry hop that’s fine, but wait until it tastes good first.[/quote]

Anecdotal homebrewing “knowledge” at its finest, I especially dismiss your comment due to the fact you felt it necessary to use caps in your BOLD statement.
He has stated it was well over three weeks ago and it fermented hot. It is well past both fermenting and conditioning happened well over a week ago especially as the yeast metabolism was sped up. Should he give it two months in primary? What other sage advice can you contribute to actually help the guy to clear up the issue other than your wise(acre) advanced pragmatism approach?

You will accelerate the chances of autolysis especially at elevated temps at cool temps this is never an issue but you are very close to the edge on many aspects here. If you wish to follow the very pragmatic advice by the last poster, so be it. If it were my coin I would rack off the yeast. If you have encountered a stuck ferment that cake is toast at this point. And any fusels or other VDK profile is set in stone now, no further “conditioning” is going to reduce these levels and like I said due to the advanced respiration cycles seen here your chances of autolysis are very real. When I mentioned “conditioning” in my above breath it was in the sense of dropping yeast/solids out of suspension and clarity now, not reabsorbing VDK or normal post ferment conditioning. I am suggested only a taste adjustment due to the fact you will have less solids ( yeast, trub (contains lipids/ fatty acids that will contribute rancid characters if left in long contact) and hop particles in contact with the aging wort. If not just let it roll with the punches and see what happens.

If “anecdotal evidence” means to you applying my personal experience to try to help a fellow brewer, which is, you know, the POINT of this forum (that’s right I used caps again, sue me), then yes that’s exactly what I’m doing. 3 weeks is not that long, I question whether the beer is “done”, particularly since denny’s rye ipa is a largish beer. Leaving it on the yeast may not help the stuck fermentation, the yeast cake may well be “toast” as you say. But racking off the yeast definately won’t help. Autolysis is no concern anytime soon, I routinely leave my beer in primary for months with no issues, as do many others around here. His temperatures aren’t all that hot, especially now that fermentation has subsided.

Leaving it on the yeast might not help. But I find it highly unlikely that it will hurt. Of course, obviously the correct thing to do is to be a jerk to someone who is just trying to help a brother out. :roll:

You are adding only anecdotal evidence and it will HELP his flavor profile by dropping excess lipids and rapidly decomposing dead yeast cells. Nothing is improving and it in fact is deteriorating especially if left on a month old cake, Sure bulk aging is recommended plenty but never leaving it on cakes for months on end, Oh He(( why dont we all just use the 1970’s brewing advice as modern advances have shown they just dont work out. If you enjoy the character that rancid lipids and fatty acids, along with decomposing yeast attribute to your beer, so be it. To advocate pragmatism on a routine and just perpetuate lazy/ anecdotal “real life” brewing advice. Which I can guarantee over 75% is just you re-purposing others thoughts not your own real experience as you just stated that “everyone else does it” is laughable guy. Plus your many prior posts show that you are on the fence of lax brewing, Which is totally fine if it works for you. Just dont claim that it is in the best interest of the OP always as you have done before to justify your posts.

And the Poor me boo hoo routine and name calling will not work on me guy. As I am the one giving scientific advice to actually help the newer brewer clean up his current situation. BTW flame baiting is the work of real jerks. :idea: Remember the fact that you are the one that resorted to name calling. Just because I pointed out your rebuttal to my original advice to the OP may be flawed.

How does it taste now that a few days have passed? Has the gravity changed?

Dude, this is a homebrew forum, not a scientific journal. You’ll be hard pressed to find any evidence that isn’t anecdotal. I didn’t see you citing any sources or presenting original research yourself.

You’re absolutely right I prefer a minimalist approach to brewing. I feel doing less is usually better. I don’t care if you disagree with me, just don’t see why you felt the need to be a jerk about it.

To the OP, sorry about all this. I’ll shut up now.

[quote=“ITsPossible”][quote=“Nate42”]DO NOT rack to secondary, at least not yet. If what it needs is conditioning, leaving it on the yeast will help.

If you want to rack before you dry hop that’s fine, but wait until it tastes good first.[/quote]

Anecdotal homebrewing “knowledge” at its finest, I especially dismiss your comment due to the fact you felt it necessary to use caps in your BOLD statement.[/quote]

Dude, CALM DOWN (please note the caps!). He’s passing on his experience. This is not a “who’s got the biggest cajones” thing. It’s entirely possible for you to express your point if view without denigrating others.

[quote=“Denny”][quote=“ITsPossible”][quote=“Nate42”]DO NOT rack to secondary, at least not yet. If what it needs is conditioning, leaving it on the yeast will help.

If you want to rack before you dry hop that’s fine, but wait until it tastes good first.[/quote]

Anecdotal homebrewing “knowledge” at its finest, I especially dismiss your comment due to the fact you felt it necessary to use caps in your BOLD statement.[/quote]

Dude, CALM DOWN (please note the caps!). He’s passing on his experience. This is not a “who’s got the biggest cajones” thing. It’s entirely possible for you to express your point if view without denigrating others.[/quote]

Seems like every time I see a post by ITsPossible he’s arguing with someone.

Looks like somebody needs a hug. LOL

Even though you never have your facts straight dobe, I still respect your opinions, their valid for you even if they dont work for others. At least you can bank on that fact. Its surprising how many people get defensive when thier blather comes up against true brewing facts.

This is where folks need to calm down. In this thread in particular my kind recommendation was torn down and dismissed as a DO NOT DO IT directive for some reason as if my comments are the ones that are way off base for some reason, well guys I will stick the brewing scientists 100+ years of researched data up against any anecdotal junk any day especially when I am being shown as “wrong” in some fashion. So if you want to dispute my statements have your rubber boots on and books out, as I dont give/ make senseless, anecdotal “helpful” posts or suggest procedural advice unless I know what the heck I’m talking about and this goes for any hobby/trade/craft as I seek out more knowledgeable people/text first in life/ forums etc… before I open my “mouth” in the name of “helping”

Another way and show of civilized behavior is to execute your viewpoint appropriately not in ways that refute my already made advice/comments unless you are making a true statement and can prove then that my method is flawed somehow not just personal opinion.(An appropriate way to do this in this thread for example would have been to say maybe IMHO you can leave it in the primary, As I myself do in the past etc… Done deal now you did not dismiss my or others comment/s, You “helped” others with your viewpoint and all is well because your not the one being a jerk and provoking and flame baiting YAH DIG. Make sense to all the caring, compassionate, lovey dovey brewers that want to help others???) Sure I can be wrong sometimes too, but in these cases I usually keep my mouth shut until I know I can truly be of assistance with real life data to make a difference for that newer brewer.

How many people in this particular hobby/craft etc… have steered any of you wrong in person (LHBS come to mind many times.) online etc… Where you wished someone would have given you better advice than the well I think you should do this because I think its right because its my own way. It so happens that home brewing can be accomplished with many differing methods although the hard science never changes folks. Sure it evolves as newer research finds better easier ways, But it all relates to natural/ proven reactions taking place in many complex relationships called brewing.

In no way do I know it all and I expect this craft will be a lifetime of learning and I am humble enough to admit that fact. If it was about pride or “cajones” I wouldn’t be able to state that. But if you feel you got your thinking cap on when deciding to dispute my advice/ facts. I am here guys ready and willing to put you in the spotlight if you want to start shining bright lights my way.

[quote=“ITsPossible”]Looks like somebody needs a hug. LOL

Even though you never have your facts straight dobe, I still respect your opinions, their valid for you even if they dont work for others. At least you can bank on that fact. Its surprising how many people get defensive when thier blather comes up against true brewing facts.

This is where folks need to calm down. In this thread in particular my kind recommendation was torn down and dismissed as a DO NOT DO IT directive for some reason as if my comments are the ones that are way off base for some reason, well guys I will stick the brewing scientists 100+ years of researched data up against any anecdotal junk any day especially when I am being shown as “wrong” in some fashion. So if you want to dispute my statements have your rubber boots on and books out, as I dont give/ make senseless, anecdotal “helpful” posts or suggest procedural advice unless I know what the heck I’m talking about and this goes for any hobby/trade/craft as I seek out more knowledgeable people/text first in life/ forums etc… before I open my “mouth” in the name of “helping”

Another way and show of civilized behavior is to execute your viewpoint appropriately not in ways that refute my already made advice/comments unless you are making a true statement and can prove then that my method is flawed somehow not just personal opinion.(An appropriate way to do this in this thread for example would have been to say maybe IMHO you can leave it in the primary, As I myself do in the past etc… Done deal now you did not dismiss my or others comment/s, You “helped” others with your viewpoint and all is well because your not the one being a jerk and provoking and flame baiting YAH DIG. Make sense to all the caring, compassionate, lovey dovey brewers that want to help others???) Sure I can be wrong sometimes too, but in these cases I usually keep my mouth shut until I know I can truly be of assistance with real life data to make a difference for that newer brewer.

How many people in this particular hobby/craft etc… have steered any of you wrong in person (LHBS come to mind many times.) online etc… Where you wished someone would have given you better advice than the well I think you should do this because I think its right because its my own way. It so happens that home brewing can be accomplished with many differing methods although the hard science never changes folks. Sure it evolves as newer research finds better easier ways, But it all relates to natural/ proven reactions taking place in many complex relationships called brewing.

In no way do I know it all and I expect this craft will be a lifetime of learning and I am humble enough to admit that fact. If it was about pride or “cajones” I wouldn’t be able to state that. But if you feel you got your thinking cap on when deciding to dispute my advice/ facts. I am here guys ready and willing to put you in the spotlight if you want to start shining bright lights my way.[/quote]

The FACT is every time I see posts by you, you’re arguing with someone.
Now please, go ahead a write another short story. It’s a slow day at work. I need something to read that will give me a good laugh.

Dobe, your a blast. You always manage to use the quote button on all my stories. It gives me pride to think you actually read and absorb my facts and your appreciation is valued greatly as it shows as you want to repeat my posts multiple times like your helping my cause. I say bravo to both myself and you at least we know each of us can read too. Thats so cool.

Protip: you can make posts on forums without using the quote button. Just type a little and hit submit.

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