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Possible problem making a belgian

I’m currently making a belgian and I accidentally put in sugar at the beginning of the boil versus the end of the boil in the instructions.

Did I f’ up badly? What will this do? Is there anything I can do now?

You made your beer less hoppy by a tiny little smidgen, and perhaps darker in color by a smidgen as well.

RDWHAHB :cheers:

You’re screwed. Its going to be…beer.

extremely minor

Unless you used a load of sugar, you will never notice.

The other issue you might have and may or may not be able to perceive is your beer might not attenuate as fully as if you had added it at the end of the boil, or more ideally, a few days into fermentation.

You want your yeast to work on the longer-chain sugars (maltose, maltriose) before they start working on the simple sugars (sucrose). I have added any simpler sugars a few days into active fermentation on my farmhouse and/or belgian ales (even on my IPAs) for awhile now with great results.

In my mind this is a key process to making a GREAT belgian-inspired beer, but you can make a drinkable one without it!

[quote=“Pietro”]The other issue you might have and may or may not be able to perceive is your beer might not attenuate as fully as if you had added it at the end of the boil, or more ideally, a few days into fermentation.

You want your yeast to work on the longer-chain sugars (maltose, maltriose) before they start working on the simple sugars (sucrose). I have added any simpler sugars a few days into active fermentation on my farmhouse and/or belgian ales (even on my IPAs) for awhile now with great results.

In my mind this is a key process to making a GREAT belgian-inspired beer, but you can make a drinkable one without it![/quote]
I’m going to make the Number 8 Strong Dark Ale in a few weeks and have been wondering about this. The kit includes 2 lbs of dark candi sugar and 1 lb of corn sugar and says to add the sugars to the boil for the last 10 minutes. So you would wait and add them a few days into active fermentation? Just dump the sugar into the fermenter or do you boil them in a bit of water and add the solution?

[quote=“dannyboy58”]
I’m going to make the Number 8 Strong Dark Ale in a few weeks and have been wondering about this. The kit includes 2 lbs of dark candi sugar and 1 lb of corn sugar and says to add the sugars to the boil for the last 10 minutes. So you would wait and add them a few days into active fermentation? Just dump the sugar into the fermenter or do you boil them in a bit of water and add the solution?[/quote]

Yeah, the majority of wisdom I have heard on simple sugars is, if possible, add them after a few days of active fermentation. You shouldn’t run any risks of contamination since the yeast is so active, but just to be safe, I would boil a quart or two of water, kill the heat, dissolve your sugars, cool the rest of the way down to 68 or so in an ice bath, and add. It will really help to give you an extra dry beer, which is what you want for a BDSA.

Summer lawnmower beer?

[quote=“Pietro”][quote=“dannyboy58”]
I’m going to make the Number 8 Strong Dark Ale in a few weeks and have been wondering about this. The kit includes 2 lbs of dark candi sugar and 1 lb of corn sugar and says to add the sugars to the boil for the last 10 minutes. So you would wait and add them a few days into active fermentation? Just dump the sugar into the fermenter or do you boil them in a bit of water and add the solution?[/quote]

Yeah, the majority of wisdom I have heard on simple sugars is, if possible, add them after a few days of active fermentation. You shouldn’t run any risks of contamination since the yeast is so active, but just to be safe, I would boil a quart or two of water, kill the heat, dissolve your sugars, cool the rest of the way down to 68 or so in an ice bath, and add. It will really help to give you an extra dry beer, which is what you want for a BDSA.

Summer lawnmower beer?[/quote]

Summer beer for sure. Maybe not lawnmower since it comes in around 9%.

[/quote]Summer beer for sure. Maybe not lawnmower since it comes in around 9%.[/quote]

Depends on the size of your lawn. :wink:

or the sharpness of your mower blades!

I was being a bit of a wisearse. I’d bottle that beast and let it age until next winter.

[quote=“Pietro”]or the sharpness of your mower blades!

I was being a bit of a wisearse. I’d bottle that beast and let it age until next winter.[/quote]
I have 12 acres and a small tractor that I mow with. A couple bottles of this and I’d be a danger to myself and the fences!

Yea I figured this one would need about 6 months aging to be at it’s best.

[quote=“gmiller598”]I’m currently making a belgian and I accidentally put in sugar at the beginning of the boil versus the end of the boil in the instructions.

Did I f’ up badly? What will this do? Is there anything I can do now?[/quote]

You did exactly what I’ve been doing for years for all the Belgian beers I’ve made. Not a problem.

[quote=“Pietro”]The other issue you might have and may or may not be able to perceive is your beer might not attenuate as fully as if you had added it at the end of the boil, or more ideally, a few days into fermentation.

You want your yeast to work on the longer-chain sugars (maltose, maltriose) before they start working on the simple sugars (sucrose). I have added any simpler sugars a few days into active fermentation on my farmhouse and/or belgian ales (even on my IPAs) for awhile now with great results.

In my mind this is a key process to making a GREAT belgian-inspired beer, but you can make a drinkable one without it![/quote]

Are you calling my Belgian beers drinkable but not great? :wink:

If you want me to even think of your belgians as drinkable, you’d better send one here so I’m able to drink it.

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