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Patersbier AG - multi vs. single infusion

Hello,

Any thoughts on the multi step vs. single infusion as listed on the NB Patersbier AG kit?

http://www.northernbrewer.com/documenta ... rsbier.pdf

In the past, I’ve done the single infusion and like the results, but was curious if the multi-step infusion dramatically improves results?

Also, regarding protein rests - does anybody know how to determine if a malt is ‘moderately-modified’ or ‘fully-modified’?

Thanks,
Fox

[quote=“apf87c”]Hello,

Any thoughts on the multi step vs. single infusion as listed on the NB Patersbier AG kit?

http://www.northernbrewer.com/documenta ... rsbier.pdf

In the past, I’ve done the single infusion and like the results, but was curious if the multi-step infusion dramatically improves results?

Also, regarding protein rests - does anybody know how to determine if a malt is ‘moderately-modified’ or ‘fully-modified’?

Thanks,
Fox[/quote]

Having done it both ways, I found no benefit to step mashing it. You can pretty much assume that any malt is OK without a protein rest. You need to get the specs from the maltster and look at the soluble/total (S/T) protein ratio. If it’s under 36, it needs a step mash. I doubt you’ll fond many, if any.

Good info. Thanks.

I’ve forgotten what prompted me to do it - I’ll just have to go with, “It seemed like a good idea at the time,” - I mashed my first Patersbier at 111 F for a ferulic acid conversion then at 147 - 148. Ferulic acid is the precursor for the phenolics I like in my weizens. It worked great using Lallemand Belle Saison fermented at 63, raising to 75. My beer had a touch of clove and spice along with saison character.

My question is: would I get the same phenolics if I’d done a single temp mash?

[quote=“Old_Dawg”]I’ve forgotten what prompted me to do it - I’ll just have to go with, “It seemed like a good idea at the time,” - I mashed my first Patersbier at 111 F for a ferulic acid conversion then at 147 - 148. Ferulic acid is the precursor for the phenolics I like in my weizens. It worked great using Lallemand Belle Saison fermented at 63, raising to 75. My beer had a touch of clove and spice along with saison character.

My question is: would I get the same phenolics if I’d done a single temp mash?[/quote]

There could be more to it than I know, but I would say you got those phenols from the yeast/fermentation temp and the mash has next to nothing to do with it.

[quote=“dobe12”][quote=“Old_Dawg”]I’ve forgotten what prompted me to do it - I’ll just have to go with, “It seemed like a good idea at the time,” - I mashed my first Patersbier at 111 F for a ferulic acid conversion then at 147 - 148. Ferulic acid is the precursor for the phenolics I like in my weizens. It worked great using Lallemand Belle Saison fermented at 63, raising to 75. My beer had a touch of clove and spice along with saison character.

My question is: would I get the same phenolics if I’d done a single temp mash?[/quote]

There could be more to it than I know, but I would say you got those phenols from the yeast/fermentation temp and the mash has next to nothing to do with it.[/quote]
Hard to say without doing a side-by-side comparison using both methods, but from my readings it seems reasonable to assume that a ferulic acid rest will boost the levels of clove-like flavors. Yes, it is the yeast that produce those compounds, but they work with what is available in the wort, and supposedly there is more clove-flavor precursors produced when you have that rest. I’ve used ferulic acid rests with wiessbiers, along with lower fermentation temperatures, and liked the results. Lower fermentation temps should lower both the banana and clove flavors, but the ferulic acid seems to boost the clove back up to allow it to be stronger than the banana.

However, I’ve never done a controlled experiment to see if all the above is real or just in my head.

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