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Over Carbed beer HELP!

Hey everyone,

I recently Brewed a citra hopped wheat beer and carbed it in a hurry due to wanting to have it ready for a buddies party. unfortunatly it is now way over carbed! after the party i put it back in my beer fridge and hooked it up to my draft system at a serving pressure of 10psi. it pours aprox 80% foam into a pint. is there a good way to “chill it out” so to speak. any input would be greatly appricated

I would unhook the gas and pull the relief valve as often as you can until you hit the serving volume you want.

1+ Just bleed off the excess CO2 from the pressure relief valve. Several times per day. Alternately you can lower your dispensing pressure to 1 or 2 psi and that may push the beer out with a “still pour.” It may still be more carbonated than you like but wheat beers are generally more highly carbed anyway. As you drink the beer over several days the overall carbonation level will drop with this low serving pressure and that’s the cool thing about kegs you can adjust the carbonation level as you go.

Are you sure it’s overcarbonated? Have you poured other beers with this system at 10 psi without foaming issues? Was it cold when you tried the test pour?

if you positive it is over carbed take it out of the fridge and start degassing it

If its not over carbed could it be somthing different? the other 2 beers on tap are fine, however the beer in Question pours like 70% foam and seems to dispense way faster than the others. its been a week now and still its this bad could it be the manifold? or somthing stuck in a dip tube? any other possible issues i would like to know about. thanks

I’d agree with this if you want if fixed quicker. Currently have a beer on tap that got over carbed, I unhooked the CO2 and pulled the pressure relief valve a few times a day. It did get better but with the beer cold it really wants to hang on to that carbonation. Now that I’m down a ways in to the keg it is tolerable. I could still get an okay pour though at the beginning, only 30% of the glass was foam. Problem is it’s a bitter and I already like my carb on the low side. :frowning:

Its certainly possible that something else is causing the CO2 to be released. If you want you can take your CO2 tank and crank it up to 20 psi or so and put it on your liquid out to try to push anything in the dip tube out. Another thing is to make sure your beer lines aren’t kinked.

Its certainly possible that something else is causing the CO2 to be released. If you want you can take your CO2 tank and crank it up to 20 psi or so and put it on your liquid out to try to push anything in the dip tube out. Another thing is to make sure your beer lines aren’t kinked.[/quote]
+1. Also, a leak on the beverage side inside the keg can cause CO2 to enter the beer stream and foam, like a bad dip tube o-ring or loose beverage post. It’s possible that the dip tube is cracked where it flares out at the top of the keg, so check that too. If you have other beers with the same length lines on the same gas supply, it’s probably not your system design.

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