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Opened a bottle to test it and whoa!

This is the Cascade Mountain IPA. Had a 9 day primary, and only did a 7 day secondary. Bottled 7 days ago and wanted to see how it’s coming along. I was encouraged when I first heard the “pffft” while removing the cap, but then… almost all of it foamed up, and shot out everywhere. I let it sit for a few minutes and poured what was left in a glass… the top of the bottle had green hops all over it from the “over flow”. I tasted what was left, and it has tons of hops floating around.

First… what caused the “violent” over flow???

Second… I’m hoping all those hops will be on the bottom of the bottle after more conditioning.

Thanks,

Just a crazy guess, but maybe too much carbonation from too much active yeast?

Another silly guess would be…9 days in the primary? Have you ever seen or read a recipe that called for that short a fermentation for an IPA?

Is it possible this beer was NOT ready to be bottled? Another crazy guess.

I used the NB priming sugar calculator. It came out .64 cup of corn sugar - I used 2/3, plus it’s only been a week.

I figured primary was finished because I got a gravity of 1.007 twice in a row with a day in between.

Obviously, it’s one or the other though.

:cheers:

Ummmm…9 days in primary?

Just a hunch…but it was not done fermenting.

What did the recipe say about how long in the primary? By the looks of what you have bottled, you should have plenty of experience with IPA and the needed time in the primary.

I guess my real question is: Is there anything I can do besides let this sit in the bottle for a long time.

Thanks

I guess the options to your question are limited…but good luck.

How long are you keeping your current brew in the primary? Why primary a big IPA for only 9 days and why use a sugar calculator for a kit that has very specific instructions?

Just curious.

[quote=“Grizz Talker”]I guess the options to your question are limited…but good luck.

How long are you keeping your current brew in the primary? Why primary a big IPA for only 9 days and why use a sugar calculator for a kit that has very specific instructions?

Just curious.[/quote]

I just primary until it’s done - if it’s 2 days or 2 months. As long as the final gravity hasn’t changed in 3 days or so, I was under the impression it was done. If that’s not the case, then please let me know. How do you figure your primary is finished???

The “very specific” instructions for priming sugar have been the same in all 7 batches I’ve done. Here’s a copy/paste of it: “24. Mix a priming solution (a measured amount of sugar dissolved in water to carbonate the bottled beer) of 2/3 cup priming sugar in 16 oz water. Bring the solution to a boil and pour into the bottling bucket.”

That’s why I use the NB calculator. What’s it for???

It had to have been done fermenting. Nine days with plenty of yeast and aeration at the start would’ve been done well before 9 days. I usually reach terminal gravity in 3-5 days.
I think the really issue is just that it’s still young and the co2 isn’t fully absorbed into the beer yet, so it gushed. Doesn’t sound like you over primed it. Did you take into account the highest temperature the beer reached during fermentation when calculating you priming solution?

I wonder if the primary could have been done but there was still enough CO2 left in solution that had not de-gassed, so that total carbonation after adding priming sugar was too high???

Another is that maybe the priming sugar was not adequately mixed into the beer so that some bottles might have more carbonation than others???

If all bottles are truly over-carbed, one thing you could consider is chilling to just above freezing and then very carefully release the seal on the cap by just partially uncapping. That might prevent a gusher. Then you could either let it sit before pouring, or you could even let it de-gas for some period of time then re-cap for later serving.

Yea, I included the temp in the priming calc. I appreciate the thoughts - I’m not going to worry about, and check another bottle in a week or so. Just another new experience in my journey of brewing. :slight_smile:

:cheers:

I’ve had a couple of batches that overcarbed. I chilled them, vented them by slightly opening the caps, then recapped. It can make a mess, but it does ease some of the gushing. Don’t do this if the beer is room temperature, or you’ll lose it all. Ask me how I know :oops:

[quote=“Steeler D”]Another is that maybe the priming sugar was not adequately mixed into the beer so that some bottles might have more carbonation than others???[/quote]Given what you’ve stated about the batch, this is the most likely culprit. If you just put the syrup on the bottom of the bottling bucket and siphoned on top and didn’t periodically stir to keep the sugar well-mixed, you could have an uneven distribution among the bottles. If you can remember which bottles were filled last, these are the ones that probably have too much sugar.

Yea, I’m guessing that’s what is. I know I did not stir the bottling bucket after it filled. So now I’ll have some over carbonated and some flat… LOL At least I learned something.

Thanks much!

:cheers:

First, good job using gravity readings instead of the calendar.
Most likely it is just over-carbonated, but an infection could also cause this issue, what did your sample taste like?
Just curious, what was your OG and what yeast did you use?

[quote=“Hades”]First, good job using gravity readings instead of the calendar.
Most likely it is just over-carbonated, but an infection could also cause this issue, what did your sample taste like?
Just curious, what was your OG and what yeast did you use?[/quote]

Thanks…

The sample had a LOT of small bits of hops floating around (I let it sit for about 10-15 minutes before trying it). This is my first real IPA, but it actually seemed pretty good. The floating hops kind of covered up the carbonation, but I could tell there was some carb - for sure. I’m definitely learning a taste for warm ale.

The starting gravity was “suppose” to be 1.086, but my starting was 1.082 - my final was 1.007 - I used two packs of Danstar American West Coast Ale dry yeast. I just pitched it dry. On this batch the pitching temp was around 76 or so - I’ve since cool my wort to mid 60’s before I pitch.

:cheers:

Your potential good news is that one gusher does not necessarily mean that the rest will be gushers. I’ve had batches where I’ve had one or two overcarbonated , a few undercarbonated, and the rest just right Goldilocks. I am a little more careful with mixing in the priming solution since. I give things a stir every dozen bottles or so. In the future, try a little harder to filter out those hop particles when you bottle. They provide nucleation sites for the CO2 to gush. And if you aren’t already, definitely chill for 24-48 hours before opening. Good luck!

OK - here’s a question - I didn’t do anything to “filter” out the hop particles. I tried to leave as much as I could on the bottom of the bucket, but that’s all… am I suppose to literally use a filter???

I use nylon mesh bags (from NB) for dry hopping and weigh it down with pie weights (marble-sized ceramic balls used to weigh-down pie crusts when they’re being pre-baked).

I sanitize the bags and the weights and put the weights in a separate bag inside of the hop bag. It really helps reduce the vast majority of the hop particulate (though you will still get a small amount of it).

[quote=“Helvetica”]I use nylon mesh bags (from NB) for dry hopping and weigh it down with pie weights (marble-sized ceramic balls used to weigh-down pie crusts when they’re being pre-baked).

I sanitize the bags and the weights and put the weights in a separate bag inside of the hop bag. It really helps reduce the vast majority of the hop particulate (though you will still get a small amount of it).[/quote]

That’s a great idea - I like that. I’m going to do that with the Plinian Legacy I just brewed today.

Thanks!

:cheers:

NB’s Priming Solution calculator asks for the current temp. of the beer, which is what I go by.

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