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Oktoberfest question

This is a first for me. hopefully, someone has seen this before. My Oktoberfest extract kit has been
lagering for the last 5 weeks. I checked it today ( it was transferred into a corney keg just b4 lagering). There was a ton of gas when I released the pin. Also, there’s a lot of foam.

It tastes excellent.

I carefully siphoned the beer out of the corney and into a plastic bucket. When I placed the lid with bubbler on it, it started bubbling like crazy !

Although I didn’t record the FG, it was within expectation and bubbling had completely stopped when I transferred it to corney and placed in lagering fridge.

Ferment temps were on the low side, but within range and lagering temps were in the mid 30’s.

There’s no sign of infection and , like I said, it tastes wonderful, even at its uncarbed stage. I should also say that I did a D-Rest for 2 days prior to lagering.

Is it that this hadn’t completed fermetation ? Would it taste this good if that was the case ?

I’m stumped.

For now, I’m going to let it sit at room temp to see what happens over the next day or 2, but I’m open to suggestions.

J

I’m a bit confused.

You transferred it from a fermenter to a corney, now back to a pail?

It’s probable that there was a little fermentaion happening, even at the cold temp it was at.

Nothing to worry about.

I don’t know why you would leave it out at room temp now. Keep it in a keg and cold.

its going to continue to bubble if you leave it @ room temp, but no, it is not fermentation.

As a solution warms up, it can’t hold as much dissolved gas, so the CO2 and anything else suspended in it precipitates out. If it is in a closed system, such as a fermenter or ale pail (with a lid on), gas will escape through the airlock.

Remember that bubbling, while it does make us homebrewers smile and think we’ve given our yeast good food and good environs, does not always mean the yeast are active.

If you like the way it tastes, tap that sucker and drink it! It will continue to ‘condition’ in your serving tank, and you will probably do more harm than good by swinging the temp up then back down. If you don’t taste butter, you didn’t need a diacetyl rest. The most common practice that necessitates a D-rest is if you pitch your yeast on the warm side, they will produce more diacetyl precursors (alpha acetolactate),which need to be cleaned up later with an equivalent rise in fermentation temp. If you don’t taste butter now, you wont taste it. Drink on, drinker.

EDIT: since you are racking all over the place, make sure to purge those vessels (now, just your serving keg) with CO2. Oxygnation is more of a concern than diacetyl.

My guess is that he was lagering in the keg and then transferring it to the bucket for bottling. Not sure there but the bottom line is that the bubbling was from C02 escaping through the airlock.

OK, looks like i panicked over nothing. Thanks for the quick replys. I’ll get this back into the corney and into the kegerator.

My thinking was that fermentation was still occuring. That’s why I put it back into the plastic bucket with an air lock. (Dumb, I know ).

I was kinda surprised at the foam I saw after lagering. Is that normal ?

J

I would say no. Typically a good, cold lager session gets the beer very clear and foam-free. My lagers are typically very “still” once they hit the secondary but I also leave my beers in primary for a pretty long time. I just racked a Festbier to secondary and it was in primary for just short of a month. Clearly no more fermentation going on with that one. Good luck with the beer & cheers.

I’m willing to bet the foam was from moving the keg.

How long did you primary and at what temp???

Maybe it was not quite done before you moved to lagering. I generally go about 4 weeks primary with my lagers. Could have maybe fermented a bit more in the keg.

I agree with others though - it is fine. And, ideally, should have just left it in keg to avoid oxidation possibility moving it around.

When you release pressure on carbonated beer it foams to beat the band. Must’ve still been working when you kegged.

EDIT: since you are racking all over the place, make sure to purge those vessels (now, just your serving keg) with CO2. Oxygnation is more of a concern than diacetyl.

Pietro, ( or anyone in the know ) care to explain how to purge a corney and the benefit of it ?

Thx,
john

[quote=“john57”]EDIT: since you are racking all over the place, make sure to purge those vessels (now, just your serving keg) with CO2. Oxygnation is more of a concern than diacetyl.

Pietro, ( or anyone in the know ) care to explain how to purge a corney and the benefit of it ?

Thx,
john[/quote]

Seal the corney, hook up the CO2 and fill to about 2 psi. Pull the pressure relief and let it refill with CO2. Repeat about 3-5 times. This eliminates most of the oxygen in your keg, reducing the risk of oxidation.

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