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Oatmeat Stout

Last year I made an Oatmeal Stout recipe twice and really loved it. I used 1lb of oats that I did
nothing with other than putting them in the last 15m of the boil. Have any of you roasted your
oats before putting then in the boil and what was the out come?

[quote=“shm56”]Last year I made an Oatmeal Stout recipe twice and really loved it. I used 1lb of oats that I did
nothing with other than putting them in the last 15m of the boil. Have any of you roasted your
oats before putting then in the boil and what was the out come?[/quote]

You will get far better results if you mash the oats. Simply boiling them may add a bit of flavor but most of what you’re adding is unconverted starch, proteins, gums, etc which are items you want to minimize in a beer. :cheers:

Even a mini-mash with some 2 row would improve you Oatmeal Stout. I have always just used “quick” oats. Quaker or store brand work fine but need to be mashed.

I use quick oats and toast them for 20-30 minutes at 300-350F. Pull em when they just start to get a little darker and your house smells like cookies. For best results, do this a few days before you brew. And yes, oats go in the mash. I’ve heard of people boiling them, but it just doesn’t make sense to me.

Here’s my recipe:

http://wiki.homebrewersassociation.org/ ... tmealstout

Do oats have that much starch? I think boiling will give you that soluble fiber that contributes a nice mouthfeel, and probably also the toasty flavor.

Hah! You guys got it all wrong. The OP is going for Oatmeat stout. So yes, of course you’ll want to roast your oatmeat. :lol:

Anyway, I’ve done like Wahoo says and toasted the oats in the oven. I could definitely pick it up in the beer, and it was really a nice, light counterpoint to the roasted grains. Go for it. But you do have to mash those buggers. Otherwise it’s fairly pointless, because you won’t get the silky mouthfeel you’re going for in that beer.

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