No Activity at 18hrs. Repitch? How long till infection?

So, the cluster… continues (see viewtopic.php?f=1&t=116604 ). I harvested Wyeast1056 from a previous batch and all I can figure is that I may have screwed up the trub separation steps.

I pitched a pint of the washed 1056 slurry into the beer, and after 18 hours, I have precisely zero visible activity. The surface of the beer is virtually clear, and the airlock doesn’t even suggest any off-gassing is occurring.

I’m guessing this calls for a repitch of fresh, storebought 1056? I suppose I could wait another 6 hours, too, but at this point I’m not hopeful. With good (average?) sanitation practices, how long does most wort last before an infection takes hold?

Pint of slurry would have shown activity by now, it was probably dead. Your probably need to pitch more yeast. If you can get US05 so you don’t need a starter.

http://woodlandbrew.blogspot.com/2012/1 ... posed.html

If you believed woodlandbrew’s research, you tossed as much good yeast as you saved. And even kept more bacteria.

How old was the slury? Did you make a starter?

Like any “lag time” issue, my response is wait 72hrs.

[quote=“Nighthawk”]Woodland Brewing Research: Yeast Washing Exposed

If you believed woodlandbrew’s research, you tossed as much good yeast as you saved. And even kept more bacteria.

How old was the slury? Did you make a starter?

Like any “lag time” issue, my response is wait 72hrs.[/quote]

crazy. then I did it totally backwards…

[quote=“Silentknyght”][quote=“Nighthawk”]Woodland Brewing Research: Yeast Washing Exposed

If you believed woodlandbrew’s research, you tossed as much good yeast as you saved. And even kept more bacteria.

How old was the slury? Did you make a starter?

Like any “lag time” issue, my response is wait 72hrs.[/quote]

crazy. then I did it totally backwards…[/quote]

The way I’ve been doing it, before reading woodlandbrew’s writings, was to NOT try separating the yeast from the trub. I save the whole thing. Then make a starter and scoop 3-4 spoonfuls out and into the starter.

Or if it is fresh enough, ~2 weeks, just pitch it into the beer.

Washing/rinsing seemed like a waste of time to me.

[quote=“Nighthawk”]
The way I’ve been doing it, before reading woodlandbrew’s writings, was to NOT try separating the yeast from the trub. I save the whole thing. Then make a starter and scoop 3-4 spoonfuls out and into the starter.

Or if it is fresh enough, ~2 weeks, just pitch it into the beer.

Washing/rinsing seemed like a waste of time to me.[/quote]

And now, after his writings, would you wash to “rinse” the trub, but then save the trub? Or would you do anything else differently?

I continue to do what I have been doing. Save the whole cake. Spoon out some and add it to a starter.

When it gets to be around a year old, make 1 last beer and toss the old cake. Save the new one.

I like to keep things simple.


How old was the yeast you used and did you make a starter?

I harvested some 1056 using Dawson’s method from BrewingTV. I did both Windsor and 1056 actually, from 2 brews. The harvested Windosr always took off like a shot, the 1056 takes about 24 or so hours to show life, then goes on and on for 3 weeks. I washed both the same way on the same day. Maybe 1056 Doesn’t like being treated that way?