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Night Brews

Up to about a month ago I had only ever done All Grain. But due to lack of time these days I had just stopped brewing. So I decided to try some extract and partial mash recipes on a much smaller scale in the evenings after dinner and see how that would go.

First time out I did an ordinary bitter with pretty much all extract. The process was new so it was a bit of a mess. In the end beer was OK, a little bland, but nice on my nitro system.

LAST NIGHT: I tried a partial mash Mild. Took me just under 4 hours, so still a little long for what I’m looking for, but I was finished before 11pm.

Here’s what I made (hope it was worth it)

1.25 kg Marris Otter
1kg Pale DME
250g Crystal (30l)
250g Amber Malt
100g Crystal (120l)
100g Chocolate
50g Black Pattent

Mashed 1hour at about 67C / Quick 10 min sparge.
Boiled 1 hour with 25g East Kent Golding (5.2) 60min

I expected a gravity of about 1.041 which is a little high for the style, but I’m not too concerned. I’m not bothering with actual readings for my quick night brews. This will be a fairly low alcohol session beer. I don’t really care how low as long as it is over 3%.

If time is your concern, my BIAB brewdays are 4 hours start to finish with a single batch sparge. 75-76% efficiency. (unless I do a 90 min mash/90 min boil…but for session beers, 75min and 60, respectively).

Its really a great process. I went through a de-gearing phase a few months back, and really enjoy my brewdays now.

Recipe looks good though, good luck!

“workin’ on some night brews…”

Amazing. Seger is literally the first thing I thought of when I saw the title of this post.

[quote=“Pietro”]If time is your concern, my BIAB brewdays are 4 hours start to finish with a single batch sparge. 75-76% efficiency. (unless I do a 90 min mash/90 min boil…but for session beers, 75min and 60, respectively).

Its really a great process. I went through a de-gearing phase a few months back, and really enjoy my brewdays now. [/quote]

I definately looked at BIAB. Right now I would need a bigger pot. I have a cheep turkey friar for my small settup right now - all my other (quality) gear is too big for this scale. Also where I am the BIAB bags are not available - If a sent away for one it was going to cost me over $70 including shipping. So I’ve used the old paint strainer for my partial mashing.

One other thing is that most BIAB processes are for 3 gal are they not? I always thought 5 gal would not be much of an issue though. What volume do you tend to do.

[quote=“Brew Meister Smith”][quote=“Pietro”]If time is your concern, my BIAB brewdays are 4 hours start to finish with a single batch sparge. 75-76% efficiency. (unless I do a 90 min mash/90 min boil…but for session beers, 75min and 60, respectively).

Its really a great process. I went through a de-gearing phase a few months back, and really enjoy my brewdays now. [/quote]

I definately looked at BIAB. Right now I would need a bigger pot. I have a cheep turkey friar for my small settup right now - all my other (quality) gear is too big for this scale. Also where I am the BIAB bags are not available - If a sent away for one it was going to cost me over $70 including shipping. So I’ve used the old paint strainer for my partial mashing.

One other thing is that most BIAB processes are for 3 gal are they not? I always thought 5 gal would not be much of an issue though. What volume do you tend to do.[/quote]

I do 5 gallon batches for BIAB, I have a 10 gallon kettle, usually pre-boil volume of 7-8 gallons.

email this dude: jeffomundson@gmail.com (http://www.bagbrewer.com/index.html) , give him the measurements of your kettle, and he will make you a bag, I think about $35, shipped (unless you are not in the continental US?).

He’s a great guy and is really good about responding to email questions on the process.

If you can only mash a 3 gallon batch, just use DME to reach the gravity of whatever beer you are making (?) and convert it to a 5 gallon (?)

[quote=“Pietro”]I do 5 gallon batches for BIAB, I have a 10 gallon kettle, usually pre-boil volume of 7-8 gallons.

email this dude: jeffomundson@gmail.com (http://www.bagbrewer.com/index.html) , give him the measurements of your kettle, and he will make you a bag, I think about $35, shipped (unless you are not in the continental US?).

He’s a great guy and is really good about responding to email questions on the process.

If you can only mash a 3 gallon batch, just use DME to reach the gravity of whatever beer you are making (?) and convert it to a 5 gallon (?)[/quote]

I do not live in the US, but I might try contacting him anyway.

Cheers

+1 on BIAB. I got a voile curtain from walmart for $4 and cut out a big circle and gathered up the edges to make a big bag. No sewing required. I’ve done 10 gallon batches with this. This method, coupled with no chill I can make a 10 gallon batch from set up to clean up in 3.5 hours.

I also have a 3V system and a chiller, which takes 6-7 hours (depending on sparge method) for a 10 gallon batch. I like both systems equally, it just depends on the style I’m brewing and how much time I have. I get consistently equivalent efficiency on my brews with each system.

[quote=“Brew Meister Smith”]So I’ve used the old paint strainer for my partial mashing.[/quote]This is the way to go with full AG batches too, IMO - use as many paint-strainer bags as you need, with each holding ~5 lbs of grain, so that each will weigh ~10 lbs when wet making them much easier to handle and drain. Also makes stirring easy.

Good Idea. Just need a bigger kettle then. I’ve been looking for something to get me a full boil for 5 gal batch. Might have to wait a bit on it though.

[quote=“CliffordBrewing”]+1 on BIAB. I got a voile curtain from walmart for $4 and cut out a big circle and gathered up the edges to make a big bag. No sewing required. I’ve done 10 gallon batches with this. This method, coupled with no chill I can make a 10 gallon batch from set up to clean up in 3.5 hours.

.[/quote]

What is this no chill meathod of which you speak?

Thanks Man, now I can’t get the Night Brews song out of my head. I can imagine everyone at work humming it all day long.

[quote=“Brew Meister Smith”]Just need a bigger kettle then.[/quote]In the meantime, you could try a reiterated mash - split the grain bill in half, mash the first half, pull the grain bags and allow them to thoroughly drain, boost the wort temp to 160F and add the second half of the grain and the collected wort for a second mash. When it’s done, pull the grain bags, pour a little 180F water through the grain bags to top up the kettle, and proceed as usual.

You can do a 20-min or 30-min mash on the first round since those sugars are going to sit through a second mash for more conversion, so you won’t add a lot of time to the process.

[quote=“Brew Meister Smith”][quote=“Edward Teach”]“workin’ on some night brews…”[/quote]Thanks Man, now I can’t get the Night Brews song out of my head. I can imagine everyone at work humming it all day long.[/quote]I’m so desperate to get it out of my head I’ve resorted to humming something even worse - “Riding the Storm Out” by REO Speedcookie.

“Come and knock on our door! We’ll be waiting to brew…”

Showww me that mild ahhhgain (oh show me that millld)

Ok i’ve reached my limit of 2 off-topic posts per day.

[quote=“Brew Meister Smith”][quote=“CliffordBrewing”]+1 on BIAB. I got a voile curtain from walmart for $4 and cut out a big circle and gathered up the edges to make a big bag. No sewing required. I’ve done 10 gallon batches with this. This method, coupled with no chill I can make a 10 gallon batch from set up to clean up in 3.5 hours.

.[/quote]

What is this no chill meathod of which you speak?[/quote]

There are lots of threads around, on here and HBT, among other forums you can search. A few links to get you started.

http://www.brewersfriend.com/2009/06/06 ... ue-tested/ http://www.biabrewer.info/viewforum.php?f=50

The concerns over chill haze and DMS, etc have pretty well been debunked on the homebrew level. I don’t even bother changing my hop additions when I no chill and it turns out great.

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