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New Keg system from NB

So I’ve ventured in the the world of kegging finally. I recently got my system from NB and filled it with Paragon Apricot Blonde. Only problem, its not carbonated… I followed all the instructions that came with the keg on force carbonating. When I pour a pint it looks carbonated and has a nice head, but its not… Any ideas?

Would like more info

What volume did you carb to if you know ?

Or if you don’t under stand

What temp was the keg at and what psi did you set the gauge at and for how long?

Does the foam decrease when you pour more than 1 beer? That first beer’s extra foam is likely from the warm beer in the tower and tube and not from carbonation.

Should actually be pretty simple. Hook up to gas. Purge oxygen. Pump it up ~30psi and shake the keg around and you’ll hear gas moving into the keg. Then I unhook the gas. Next morning I rehook
up gas and set to serving psi. Within a few days later everything should be perfect.

[quote=“erikhillard”]Does the foam decrease when you pour more than 1 beer? That first beer’s extra foam is likely from the warm beer in the tower and tube and not from carbonation.

Should actually be pretty simple. Hook up to gas. Purge oxygen. Pump it up ~30psi and shake the keg around and you’ll hear gas moving into the keg. Then I unhook the gas. Next morning I rehook
up gas and set to serving psi. Within a few days later everything should be perfect.[/quote]

NEVER USE OXYGEN TO PURGE WITH CO2 ONLY You want to purge any oxygen out of the keg.

I do not like or use the shake and bake method put the keg in the fridge at 34 -36 deg with 8 or 9 psi and wait for a few days you will never over carb a beer that way.

Keg is at roughly 38-40 deg… 10 psi for about a day.

If I’m understanding you correctly 10 psi for a day isn’t enough time. I usually set mine to 13 psi at 40 degrees for my blondes and it takes about 2 weeks to fully carb.

1 day is way too short. 8)

I have mine at 38 F , 11 psi.

I usually wait a week before sampling. 99 % of the time it is ready to go. Ales mostly here.

It’s almost always better at 10 days to 2 weeks.

Good luck and enjoy!

Ahhhh… ok, from what the instructions implied, it made it seem like once you turned on the gas and did a little shaking you were good to go. Gas back on, update to follow. Thanks!

You need to keep the gas on so it pushes itself into solution.

You can shake the keg a few times each day to help it along. As long as you don’t turn up the pressure, you will not need to worry about over carbonating the beer.

I have the same question as well. I bought a dual pinlock kegging system from Midwest and the paperwork included says this:

[i][b]1. Siphon beer into sanitized keg, attach keg lid and seal

  1. With gas line connected, increase pressure to about 30 psi - double check for leaks!

  2. C02 dissolves into beer much more easily when the beer is cold, so ideally, place the keg with gas line attached into the fridge and leave under pressure for about 24 hours.

  3. Test carbonation level - turn down regulator pressure to about 10 psi and release excess pressure in keg by lifting the pressure relief valve.

  4. Attach sanitized beer line assembly, pour a beer and enjoy. If more carbonation is needed, turn to about 20 psi and leave for another 24 hours.[/b][/i]

Is this not the correct way to go about it? I have a batch to carbonate this weekend, my first kegging adventure.
Please advise. :mrgreen:

I doubt that 24hrs at 30psi will get the beer close to carbonated.

If you get it chilled and have it set to 10psi, shake the keg 2-3 times a day. This will help to force the CO2 into solution. But you will not over carbonate it because you have it only set to 10psi.

You might want to go to the store and pick up a 2 part epoxy glue. More than likely the tap line is going to be to short for a good pour. Put the spiral mixer in the line (some suggest in the dip tube) to simulate a longer line.

I generally set the regulator to 30psi and leave it connected to the keg (with the beer at 33°F) for three days and I pretty much get the exact amount of carbonation I like once the beer comes back up to serving temperature (for me that’s around 50-55°F).
Seeing as how I despise overly fizzy or freezing cold beer, normal folks would probably want to leave it connected at 30psi for an extra day or two.
In any case, there’s really no advantage to setting it at a lower PSI and leaving it longer (though it’s fine if you’ve got the extra time). Set it as high as your regulator will allow, sample frequently after the first couple of days (first bleeding the excess pressure off slowly before pouring) and take notes so you know how many days on average it takes to hit your own ‘sweet spot’

If the beer in the keg is cold and you’re in a rush, connecting at 30psi and shaking the keg for 20 minutes gets you there as well. A bit of a rest afterwards (for the keg) is recommended. But you can definitely carb it that way in the morning, and be doing perfect pours in the evening. At least, that’s been my experience in those very rare instances when I was rushed.

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