New brewer question: foamy hefeweisen

Hi there - I purchased a Hefeweisen kit from Northern Brewer and the finished product tastes great. But, it’s got a serious head, pouring the beer takes a while. Is this normal? And if not, what can I do next time to eliminate the foam? I don’t have a keg, I brewed and bottled 5 gallons of this.

Thanks!

If you used all the priming sugar in the kit (or the amount NB specified), you probably overprimed your beer, maybe by a good amount. Next batch you do, use a priming calculator to determine the proper amount of priming sugar to use for whichever style you’re brewing, and you should be ok.

By the way, welcome to the forum. :cheers:

Use a scant 3/4 cup corn sugar or scant 2/3 cup cane sugar per 5 gallons. If you didn’t have exactly 5 gallons but closer to 4.5 gallons or something like that, then you need to use even a little less than that. Finally, I should also mention – hefeweizen is supposed to be a highly carbonated style. Both the wheat content and the craziness of the hefeweizen yeast strains make it more foamy than normal. So it could be one of these factors, or a combination of several of them. Bottom line is, next time just use a little less priming sugar than you think you need to use, and everything will probably turn out better. With practice you’ll learn how much to use for your own process.

Thanks guys! I’ll use the priming sugar calculator this time around, I had used the entire package of priming sugar that came with my kit. Oops! :?

If you’re overcarbed, you may also want to get the remaining bottles in the fridge. It will slow/stop the carbing process. I’ve had one overcarbed batch turn into gushers which fountain foam when opened; both wasteful and messy.

Not to be an alarmist, but if they can’t get in the fridge consider a plastic box, or put the case in a garbage bag. Something leakproof. REALLY overcarbed beers can explode. In my few years brewing, I’ve had one bottle bomb; and then I think the bottle may have been partially to blame, but better safe than sorry; all my cases get bagged, especially if I think they may be under attenuated.