Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com

Neipa?

Continuing the discussion from BU:GU Ratio:

9# two row
1.75# each of white wheat and flaked oats
.75 carapils
1# rice hulls

Using WLP008
Bittering fw 1.5 Magnum
1 each of Simcoe, Amarillo, Mosaic at 15, FO, and 7 days.

BU:GU is .88 which makes me a conformist. Color will be super pale which is what after as well and makes me a nonconformist. Thoughts?
Thoughts?

My bittering addition is similar, but my next addition isn’t until 3 minutes left in boil, then Whirlpool, then Dry Hop as krausen starts falling. Seems to work out quite nicely.

EDIT: After reading @sneezles61 comment below, I should probably note I’m brewing 11 gallons worth of finished wort.

The BU:GU ratio is a new technique to me, but it would appear mine comes in at 1.05. My color clocks in at 5.8 SRM via 2-row and C40 - nothing else.

From what I’ve read there’s a school of thought about using adjuncts for mouthfeel. That’s where I wa going with the oats. The wheat was tontry to take a stab at a clone of a beer I like. I will rethink my hops additions. I like your idea of way late in the boil. Thanks!

1 Like

It takes a lot of hops, but the end result is worth it. I only use Citra and Denali, and it comes out tasting like Five Alive.

1 Like

The 1.5 bittering for a 5-er is a bit to strong IMHO… I’d back off to .75 or if you’d like 3/4 oz…:smile: Don’t get me wrong, magnum is a good bittering hop, and sometimes its too much… Sneezles61

3 Likes

Keep the grist as is. Move your hops to later in the boil as @voltron suggested.

What yeast? This will lend to mouthfeel and color as you don’t want it clear. Which also means to skip any kettle finings or fermenter finings.

1 Like

I’m using WLP008, East Coast Ale.
The beer I’m going after is called Wheezin’ the Juice. The stuff looks like cloudy lemonade in a glass so that’s why the color is so pale.

Even though the quote is from Encino Man, I was thinking they made a Weiss and IPA’d it up with the hops and yeast. That’s my basis here. I may be Wheezin’ up the wrong juice tree but it sounded like a good idea! :nerd:

2 Likes

Hope yours turns out a little different than Encino man! Thanks for posting that, haven’t seen that movies in years!

Thanks for the suggestions @voltron and @loopie_beer Based on your comments I went from the above to this:

Bittering fw 1.5 Magnum
1 each of Simcoe, Amarillo, Mosaic at 1 minute, WP, and 7 days.

@sneezles61 - I do appreciate your counsel on the Magnum. I still plan to stick to the 1.5oz since I’m a bitter guy and the calculated 58 IBU is kind of in my wheelhouse.

Thanks again for your comments all! I feel like I’m starting to understand just how much I DON’T KNOW! It’s frickin’ awesome! :grinning:

1 Like

What’s the AA% of your magnum? I’m going to agree with @sneezles61 that would appear to be a butt load of bittering hops even if you’re using it as FWH. I generally try to get about 25-30 IBU from my bittering hops in an IPA. I don’t go for a mouth puckering bitterness so I guess it depends on what you’re going for.

I agree with @voltron on moving your other hops to more of a hop bursting approach. I usually begin around the 5 minute mark.

Bitter is good, bitter is good. I like a bitter in your face west coast Ipa, no problem.
Now if you are really looking for a NEIPA profile, bittering hops are minimal or absent. On my last NEIPA attempt I didn’t add any hops until 15 minutes left in the boil, with heavy hopstand and dry hopping.

Well technically speaking he’s not doing any bittering hops…just first wort…

Good discussion of FWH vs traditional Boil additions:

The beer I’m trying to come close to is 37 ibus so it wouldn’t have hurt to tone it down. This recipes dials up to 58 ibus which is pretty much okay for me. It may be a little much for this particular beer though. I’ll report back when I get this on tap. Again, thank you guys for your input, answers to my questions, and suggestions!

58 IBU isn’t really that high to be honest. I’m not an avowed “hophead” and my IPAs typically fall in the 60-70IBU range. It’s all about where the IBUs come from for me. I like FWHs and late additions for the flavor and aroma they create. As I said earlier I try to get 25-30 IBU from my bittering hops and by that I mean 60 minute addition. I don’t really consider FWH bittering hops.

That’s a good article @voodoo_donut. There are also a few good threads on here regarding FWH vs bittering addistions.

As a precursor to this post, I have yet to develop my own recipe and have been brewing AG kits (mostly from our host) for the past 3 years and extract kits for 2 years before that. I have tinkered with some specialty grain additions to kits that I have brewed many times but never designed my own recipe. . .yet. :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye:

The only NEIPA I’ve ever brewed is Off the Topper from our hosts. The only bittering addition is hopshot, then there is 7.5 oz of flameout & whirlpool hopstands. I do this side by side every year with the Plinian Legacy, which also uses hopshot for the primary bittering charge but it has a 1/4 oz FWH, a 1 oz addition at 45 minutes, a 1 oz addition at 20 mins, then 4 oz flameout hopstand. Both hopshot additions are 10 ML, which according to This roughly calculates out to 100 IBU. I am unsure how accurate that rating is but it’s the only bittering addition in Off the Topper, the rest are all flavor/aroma additions. Both have two dry hop additions as well. According to my software I use, Plinian Legacy calculates out at 162 IBU and Off the Topper calculates out at 90. Again, I don’t believe these numbers to be completely accurate.

I am not the best at descriptions but if I had to describe the difference between the two, Plinian Legacy comes out crisper, more bitey whereas Off the Topper comes off a bit smoother with more of a nose. I enjoy them both equally, which is why I do them side by side every year. As several others have mentioned, I would think you may want to bump some of those hop additions to later in the boil or to a flameout hopstand if you are going for a NEIPA style.

:beers:
Rad

Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com