Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com

NB American Wheat, want to add honey

Before you yell at me, I used search first but found nothing definitive. I am trying a wheat beer and want to add honey but I want it for flavor not for yeast to eat up. I’m unsure when to add it to my batch when this kit calls for only two week ferment then on to bottles. The one thing all search states is don’t add to boil. My second question is I have upgraded to kegs and wonder is there a difference in the beer if I force carbonate over mixing a priming solution

It will likely get eaten no matter when you add it? Have you considered using some honey malt instead?

No, didn’t consider that route. Still very new to beer brewing. Just trying to find one I’ll enjoy and honey what was my next option just finish a kolsch, and it is good but still not what I’m looking for, friends love it though. So they will eat it all and will be no hint of honey let?

How true is this? I found it on Midwest forums…
Adding honey to the boil
• Adding it to the beginning of the boil will add fermentable sugar to the wort but no flavor
• Adding it to the middle of the boil will fermentable sugar and a light honey note
• Adding it to the end of the boil will add a stronger honey flavor and aroma

I think you might be on to a nice flavor in a wheat beer. I have had problems trying to get a honey taste in my Honey Brown Ales as even when I add the honey after boil the yeast just eats it up.
Just remember that Honey Malt has to be mashed. It is all starches till the enzymes in the mash convert it to the sugars you want.

I don’t think this is true. NB includes honey malt in their cream ale extract kit.

Most of the folks on this forum that I’ve heard talk about honey mostly agree that it’s difficult if not impossible to get any perceivable honey flavor by adding honey at any point (other than in the glass). I’ve done about 4 5gallon batches of NB’s extract american wheat and I’ve used honey each time(at flameout)… All good beers but no honey taste. I hope you try the honey malt. If you do, let us know how it goes.

Now I know what all you guys are thinking–when I didn’t get any flavor out of the honey the first time, why 4 more times? I…really…don’t…know. Although it does seem to dry the beer out a little, which has been a plus.

Ron

Thanks guys, I’ll for sure left you know about the malt, I’m going to order it as soon as this post is posted, with a new batch of American Wheat. I’ll just give this a whirl while I wait for the next batch, with the quick ship times from NB I’ll have the next batch started in no time. With only two weeks fermenting they’ll be ready fast enough to give an update.

Did any one know the answer to my second question about force carb over mixing a prime in the keg far as taste and what not?

Honey Malt has a diastatic power of 50. That is a measure of the ability to shelve convert from starch to sugar. The minimal number is 35.
So it can be steeped but I think you are running the risk of adding starch.
Sugars are developed in the malting process but are not caramelized like crystal malt.
I went to Gambrinus’s web site and can not find the answer. My malt chart say to only mash but there seems to be two schools of thought.
What I did learn it is a strong malt and should be used in small amounts. 4 oz in 5 gals. is a good start. Please chime in as this sounds like a interesting malt.

Why couldn’t you cold crash and add the honey just before kegging and force carbing? I realize that there will still be yeast and the honey will be eaten up by the yeast at some point but…

Or am I on the wrong track altogether?

[quote=“lil_Blue_Ford”]Why couldn’t you cold crash and add the honey just before kegging and force carbing? I realize that there will still be yeast and the honey will be eaten up by the yeast at some point but…

Or am I on the wrong track altogether?[/quote]

would I want to do that before or after I filter to my bright keg?

Don’t add honey before you keg because the remaining yeast will ferment the sugars and over carbonate your beer.

Also, how are you filtering your beer before the bright tank? If you’re running it through a strainer you will be oxidizing your batch, which is not a good thing.

[quote=“lil_Blue_Ford”]Why couldn’t you cold crash and add the honey just before kegging and force carbing? I realize that there will still be yeast and the honey will be eaten up by the yeast at some point but…

Or am I on the wrong track altogether?[/quote]
I think you are exactly on the right track; the later in the process you add the honey, the stronger the character you will get from it. For beer that will be bottled, you will want to add honey as the priming sugar. Just calculate how much sugar you need (by weight), and multiply that by 1.33 to get the honey weight to add, which accounts for the water content.

If kegging, you want to kill the yeast before adding the honey, OR make sure to keep the beer cold afterwards to prevent the yeast from actively consuming the honey. This probably will only work with ale yeasts, not lager yeasts as they can still be sluggishly active at refrigeration temperatures. Remember that if you are adding honey and preventing the yeast from fermenting it, you will be making your beer sweeter as well as adding honey flavor.

[quote=“S.Scoggin”]Don’t add honey before you keg because the remaining yeast will ferment the sugars and over carbonate your beer.

Also, how are you filtering your beer before the bright tank? If you’re running it through a strainer you will be oxidizing your batch, which is not a good thing.[/quote]

I have BeerBrite, it’s a co2 fed filtration system from keg to keg…

[quote=“rebuiltcellars”][quote=“lil_Blue_Ford”]
If kegging, you want to kill the yeast before adding the honey, OR make sure to keep the beer cold afterwards to prevent the yeast from actively consuming the honey. This probably will only work with ale yeasts, not lager yeasts as they can still be sluggishly active at refrigeration temperatures. Remember that if you are adding honey and preventing the yeast from fermenting it, you will be making your beer sweeter as well as adding honey flavor.[/quote][/quote]

If I use my beerbrit would that rid me of enough yeast to prevent them from eating my honey then?

I’ve done 2 NB American Wheat kits. The second one today, actually. I used 1.5 lbs of honey at flameout both times, the first time clove, this time wildflower. I also added the zest and juice of four lemons at the same time. The first batch had a nice aroma of honey and a small honey taste with a little tartness from the lemon. I liked it so much the first time that I wanted to do a second batch! The research that I read was to add it at flameout to get the maximum amount of honey flavor. Good luck!

[quote=“ViViDBrew”][quote=“rebuiltcellars”][quote=“lil_Blue_Ford”]
If kegging, you want to kill the yeast before adding the honey, OR make sure to keep the beer cold afterwards to prevent the yeast from actively consuming the honey. This probably will only work with ale yeasts, not lager yeasts as they can still be sluggishly active at refrigeration temperatures. Remember that if you are adding honey and preventing the yeast from fermenting it, you will be making your beer sweeter as well as adding honey flavor.[/quote][/quote]

If I use my beerbrit would that rid me of enough yeast to prevent them from eating my honey then?[/quote]
Not unless the beerbrite uses a sterile filter with a pore size of <0.45 microns. Anything bigger than that will allow some cells to get through.

OH yeah, can I skip this step since I am kegging?

  1. Condition bottles at room temperature for 2 weeks.
    After this point, the bottles can be stored cool or cold.

or should I store it in keg for a while before I filter and carb it?

Thanks again for all the replies guys

[quote=“ViViDBrew”]OH yeah, can I skip this step since I am kegging?

  1. Condition bottles at room temperature for 2 weeks.
    After this point, the bottles can be stored cool or cold.

or should I store it in keg for a while before I filter and carb it?

Thanks again for all the replies guys[/quote]
The answer to that is not so straight forward. No, you do not need to worry about conditioning the bottles to allow carbonation to develop, but you might still want to give the beer time to mature before you drink it, as the flavors will change (typically for the better). If this wasn’t a wheat beer, I’d tell you to give it 3-4 weeks in the primary or secondary to let it clear before kegging and serving, but wheats are suppose to have some cloudiness. Which suggests you might want to skip the use of your filter for this one.

You’re killing me rebuiltcellars :slight_smile: The directions call for 2 weeks in the Primary and no secondary, should I let it sit longer then anyways is what you are saying? Then on to sit in the keg? Should I let it sit uncarb to mature in the keg? Should I keep it cold? I know many of these question may have already been asked else where, but as we already have this thread and new things come about feel it’s easier to ask then to search and get all kinds of mixed results.

Back to Shopping at NorthernBrewer.com