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My First Bottle Bomb

I hope it’s my last!!! I knew that this batch was overcarbonated, but I didn’t think it was this bad! After the explosion, the rest of the bottles went into the fridge. I’ll drink 'em quick![attachment=0]IMG_3047[1].JPG[/attachment]

Just had my first bomb today. Bourbon Porter after 1 week conditioning. This is only my 5th batch so I really need some advice. These are bottled in regular 12 ounce commercial bottles. I’m wondering if I just had a weak bottle, ambient temp is around 75-78. What should I do?

Put 'em in the fridge, man. That’s really all you can do. The colder temps will help the carbonation calm down and force the remaining active yeast to drop out. Also, don’t put anything near your bottles that you’re worried about getting covered in beer, because that could happen. :cheers:

Should I maybe open one just to check carbonation?

Feel free to. Odds are you will want to do it over a sink since it will gush like crazy, but when it settles down it’ll still be beer… however, if they’re only a week old they won’t taste like they’re supposed to.

To the OP: sorry to hear about it, man. But, it’s an initiation process. Kinda.

Thanks, hoppenheimer. Did exactly what you suggested. Holy Cow! Lost about 1/4 cup out of one bottle. Taste is good but not full. I’m assuming there is nothing more I can do to age this beer.? All are now in bottom of fridge. Also, is there any way to prevent this in the first place or does it just “happen”? Thanks again.

Yes make sure that the yeast is done fermenting before bottling, adjust your bottling sugar.

Thanks again for the help, guys. Brewing is just too much fun.

Yes make sure that the yeast is done fermenting before bottling, adjust your bottling sugar.[/quote]
+1, if they’re gushing like that after a week, there’s an excellent chance it hadn’t finished fermenting.

Yes make sure that the yeast is done fermenting before bottling, adjust your bottling sugar.[/quote]
+1, if they’re gushing like that after a week, there’s an excellent chance it hadn’t finished fermenting.[/quote]

Or some are way over carbonated and others not at all due to improper mixing of the priming sugar.

I’ve had this happen before. It’s typically only a problem if you bottled your beer while it was cold (after lagering or cold crashing) and didn’t periodically stir up the priming sugar in the mix during bottling. The priming sugar will definitely soar to the bottom if you’re bottling it cold.

Or if you add too much priming sugar. I typically go for a little under 3/4 cup of corn sugar and even then it’s higher than I’d like from time to time.

I’m sure I srewed up either the calculation or the measurement of the sugar. I used one of the online priming calculators (can’t remember which one, but I know I checked a couple and they agreed.) My mistake had to be related to the fact that I (mini) kegged 1/3 of the batch and bottled the rest, priming the keg seperatly.

I’ve been brewing for over 19 years and like the title would suggest, this was a first for me. I will definately change the way I prime.

At least the beer tastes good, though I gotta pour it really slow!

if they’re all bombs, try this: open outside or in the sink when the bottle is placed in a mixing bowl. when it gushes out the beer will all collect in the bowl, ready to settle and drink.

not a great way to impress anybody, but every bit counts, esp if it’s a good batch otherwise.

I have had 1 bottle bomb in each of my last two batches. I have not had gushing problems so I am chalking them up to bad bottles. They were both bottles from a case that was handed down to me by a fellow brewer who now kegs. I bet the bottles have seen 30-40 batches run through them though. You can tell they are old because they easily weigh twice as much as new bottles that come full. Sad to see the old bottles go but I am phasing them out by replacing them with empties I create from store bought brew.

[quote=“Davisdog”]I’m sure I srewed up either the calculation or the measurement of the sugar. I used one of the online priming calculators (can’t remember which one, but I know I checked a couple and they agreed.) My mistake had to be related to the fact that I (mini) kegged 1/3 of the batch and bottled the rest, priming the keg seperatly.

I’ve been brewing for over 19 years and like the title would suggest, this was a first for me. I will definately change the way I prime.

At least the beer tastes good, though I gotta pour it really slow![/quote]

When it tastes good, that is all that matters. I find it so funny on here that we all have had “travesties” and became highly concerned about our beer. Only to drink it and find out… Hey, this is pretty good! We are proud of our beer gentlemen, and when we think it doesn’t turn out right, our world comes crashing down until we taste it! I absolutely love this hobby :smiley:

:cheers:

Don’t fool around with potential bottle bombs. I’ve had them embed glass shrapnel in my walls, a person could get seriously hurt.

Open those puppies (carefully) while wearing gloves and safety glasses. Keeping them cold will help keep the problem from getting worse, but if they’re already under more pressure than the glass is designed for they could still fail at any time. Either venting and recapping, or carefully dumping into a keg if you can, are probably good ideas.

[quote=“Nate42”]Don’t fool around with potential bottle bombs. I’ve had them embed glass shrapnel in my walls, a person could get seriously hurt.

Open those puppies (carefully) while wearing gloves and safety glasses. Keeping them cold will help keep the problem from getting worse, but if they’re already under more pressure than the glass is designed for they could still fail at any time. Either venting and recapping, or carefully dumping into a keg if you can, are probably good ideas.[/quote]

And don’t forget to put a blowoff tube on your lagers!

Sorry, couldn’t resist :oops:

FWIW, so far I’m 2 for 2 on bottle bombs happening in the fridge.

Not exactly a huge sample size, but it does make make it hard for me to believe that refrigeration does much to prevent bottles from exploding if I can have them bursting in the fridge while all the ones in the cellar remain intact.

I think this is what happened to me. I had no idea that you had to calculate priming sugar. I just used what came with the recipe kit. That worked well with all other brews, but this was my first porter. As I’ve looked at the calculators, I think I probably had about 1/8 cup too much priming sugar. The good news is , the beer is AWESOME! After a day in the fridge, I double poured one, let it sit for about 5 minutes, and wow. I can’t wait to make the bourbon porter again! Thanks for all the help.

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