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Mashed @ 160F! Now what?

I am am making a Maibock with a recipe from Brewing Classic Styles. 10.5# pils & 6 # Munich. The Jamil’s book said mash at 156F. Higher than my usual 152f but bocks need more body right? Anyway, I have some new equipment and changed my process. Added my water to the grain instead of the other way around like I usually do. Mash was stiff but temp was right at 156 at the beginning of the mash. I checked the temp @ 45 minutes it was 160F. Ugh! I guess I didn’t have the mash stirred and the temps really equalized. The liquid on top of the mash still looked cloudy at 60 minutes! I don’t think it was fully converted as I probably cooked my enzymes.

Any way, I decided to add 2# pils malt for some new enzymes and dropped the temp to 147F for 15 minutes, then stepped the temp to 152F for 15 minutes to make sure the new pils malt was converted.

So, will this approach save my mash? Any thoughts?

Boil
Ferment
Bottle or Keg
Enjoy

[quote=“Brick1083”]Boil
Ferment
Bottle or Keg
Enjoy[/quote]

^This. I think you just need to go for it. Sounds like you made a valiant effort to correct your problem; more so than I would have done at least. Roll with it and see what happens

Oh yeah, I’m still making this beer. It may not yield competition entries like I was hoping for, but just an every day drinker instead. My question really is: Any thoughts on the body and fermenatability of this type of wort? Obviously, I’ll find out in a few weeks.

I’m only about 6 batches in to all-grain. It’s taken me a little while to nail down the characteristics of my system. My first few mashes were consistently too warm. I mashed several batches in the 157-160 range, successfully. With extract, my FGs were typically around 1.013-1.015. Even though I’ve mashed high, my all-grain FGs have been lower, around 1.010-1.012. To summarize, I don’t think you’ll have an issue with fermentablility.

[quote=“Duxx”]I am am making a Maibock with a recipe from Brewing Classic Styles. 10.5# pils & 6 # Munich. The Jamil’s book said mash at 156F. Higher than my usual 152f but bocks need more body right? Anyway, I have some new equipment and changed my process. Added my water to the grain instead of the other way around like I usually do. Mash was stiff but temp was right at 156 at the beginning of the mash. I checked the temp @ 45 minutes it was 160F. Ugh! I guess I didn’t have the mash stirred and the temps really equalized. The liquid on top of the mash still looked cloudy at 60 minutes! I don’t think it was fully converted as I probably cooked my enzymes.

Any way, I decided to add 2# pils malt for some new enzymes and dropped the temp to 147F for 15 minutes, then stepped the temp to 152F for 15 minutes to make sure the new pils malt was converted.

So, will this approach save my mash? Any thoughts?[/quote]

As Brick1083 said just brew it and it will still be beer but for future reference if your mash temp comes in too high add cold water to bring it down.

I know that if one of those Beer Styles books said to mash @ 190F people would still do it but even 156F is way too high for this style, IMHO. A bock should be getting its body from the rich malts and high OG but should have a clean finish from a low mash temp. Ending the mash schedule with a short stay in the high 150s after starting at lower temperatures (see Hochkurz and Decoction mashing) is OK but if using a single temp mash I’d suggest 148-150F.

[quote=“Duxx”]I am am making a Maibock with a recipe from Brewing Classic Styles. 10.5# pils & 6 # Munich. The Jamil’s book said mash at 156F. Higher than my usual 152f but bocks need more body right? Anyway, I have some new equipment and changed my process. Added my water to the grain instead of the other way around like I usually do. Mash was stiff but temp was right at 156 at the beginning of the mash. I checked the temp @ 45 minutes it was 160F. Ugh! I guess I didn’t have the mash stirred and the temps really equalized. The liquid on top of the mash still looked cloudy at 60 minutes! I don’t think it was fully converted as I probably cooked my enzymes.

Any way, I decided to add 2# pils malt for some new enzymes and dropped the temp to 147F for 15 minutes, then stepped the temp to 152F for 15 minutes to make sure the new pils malt was converted.

So, will this approach save my mash? Any thoughts?[/quote]

Did you do an iodine test?

[quote=“brwrboy69”][quote=“Duxx”]I am am making a Maibock with a recipe from Brewing Classic Styles. 10.5# pils & 6 # Munich. The Jamil’s book said mash at 156F. Higher than my usual 152f but bocks need more body right? Anyway, I have some new equipment and changed my process. Added my water to the grain instead of the other way around like I usually do. Mash was stiff but temp was right at 156 at the beginning of the mash. I checked the temp @ 45 minutes it was 160F. Ugh! I guess I didn’t have the mash stirred and the temps really equalized. The liquid on top of the mash still looked cloudy at 60 minutes! I don’t think it was fully converted as I probably cooked my enzymes.

Any way, I decided to add 2# pils malt for some new enzymes and dropped the temp to 147F for 15 minutes, then stepped the temp to 152F for 15 minutes to make sure the new pils malt was converted.

So, will this approach save my mash? Any thoughts?[/quote]

Did you do an iodine test?[/quote]
Guessing not.

Not sure if you really need the iodine test…shouldn’t your OG reading inherently tell you what your efficiency was?

156-160F will be fine. I bet you’ll love it.

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