Looking for some advice/ correction on the souring process

I Brewed a pretty basic beer, added some saison yeast, fermented out, then added the GIGA Lacto and some Brett Trois, to the fermented beer.
Having NEVER done anything sour/ funky before, I pretty much just threw stuff together. So, my question is, how badly did I screw up? What should I have done ?
The brew has some nice pelical on it, so I know the Brett did SOMETHING, I’m just not sure what… haha.
Any advice would be awesome!
Scott

Not a bad way to do it! A lot of people will sour the wort with lacto prior to pitching sacch yeast, but I’ve heard that Giga’s lacto is pretty tough stuff, so it’ll probably be fine! Is it L Brevis?

It appears that Brett Trois is actually sacch yeast, and not actually a brett strain, so that might be a lacto pellicle you’re seeing. If you don’t get any contribution from it, you might want to seek out some Jolly Pumpkin or similar dregs to toss in there, that’ll get it going for sure.

Not quite sure what to say given the info provided above. If you are serious about sour beers, the best advice I can give you is to read American Sour Beers
http://www.amazon.com/American-Sour-Beers-Michael-Tonsmeire/dp/1938469119/ref=tmm_pap_title_0?ie=UTF8&qid=1423673883&sr=8-1
. Great book that covers every aspect of producing a sour beer–including some details from well respected commercial brewers. One of the more readable Brewers Publications books IMO.

Just before the book was published last year, Michael also wrote an article for Zymurgy or BYO (can’t remember which). I believe he also gave a talk at an AHA conference, which would be available to members on the AHA website.

I will add that last summer I pitched some dregs into a Belgian Golden that I thought had too much banana flavor. It turned out really nice, although I’m giving it more time since another pelicle has formed after taking a gravity/tasting sample.

+1 to American Sour Beers! Great book, and the author is really good about answering questions.

There is no one-right-way to make sours.

Gr8abe, what are you looking to get out of the sour?

Starting with a clean fermented beer and using the souring bugs in secondary is a nice way to get started, as it keeps bacteria out of your primary fermenters. The biggest downfall to this, though, is that you may not get as much sourness as if you had pitched your lacto with your primary yeast.

[quote=“porkchop”]

Starting with a clean fermented beer and using the souring bugs in secondary is a nice way to get started, as it keeps bacteria out of your primary fermenters. The biggest downfall to this, though, is that you may not get as much sourness as if you had pitched your lacto with your primary yeast.[/quote]

The simple reason for this is that the bugs have very little if anything to eat at this point, so they aren’t spitting out a lot of lactic/acetic acid or any of their esters. A lot of breweries and homebrewers add fruit along with the bugs/brett after a sacc yeast primary ferment.

Personally, I have had the best results by brewing a clean beer, pitching roseleare directly, and waiting 12-18 months, adding oak chips and/or spirals at around 6-10 months.

To the OP, I might suggest throwing some fruit or fresh wort into your fermenter. Or just let it ride, brew another batch and blend them.

+1000 to American Sour Beers. He really did a great job integrating all of his personal research from Madfermentationist to brewery and other homebrewer data to create a comprehensive guide.

Honestly, I had no real goals in brewing this beer, other that using it as a fact finding mission, to see what would happen, The more I read about the process, the more I’m curious to do a sour mash as opposed to the “dump-everything-in-and-cross-your-fingers” approach. I haven’t tasted it, honestly after seeing the Pelical (but before knowing what it was) I was positive that the whole thing was ruined, knowing now that’s not the case, I wanna taste it and see what I have, I still have no idea about how much actual sourness I even have!

Sour mash you will only get lactic tartness from the lactobacillus on the grain that spits out lactic acid. I personally like some (but not a lot of) acetic tartness, particularly in a Flanders Red, which comes from acetobacter. I really think Roselaere is a great blend and far beyond the ‘throw it in and pray’ approach as its a mix of sherry yeast, acetobacter, lacto, and brett. These days there are lots of blends from places such as East Coast Yeast and The Yeast Bay for ‘wild’ ales (quoted since because the blends are sold commercially, they are not exactly ‘wild’ anymore).

A pellicle does not necessarily indicate a good bug fermentation. The organisms create it as a barrier to oxygen, so at some point, oxygen may have seeped into the beer.

Sour brewing is a little different from ‘clean’ brewing, because while conditions (temp, oxygen, vessel, time, culture that is used to ferment) are important, dialing in a flavor comes more from blending than the fermentation itself.