Long Primary Fermentation...Issues?

I brewed the Lakefrot IBA on 9/23 and as a result of a move haven’t taken it out of the primary yet. Is this going to cause issues? It’s been at a constant temp, but due to most of my stuff being in storage I haven’t been able to transfer to a secondary and/or dry hop yet. Since it’s dark, I was thinking about dryhopping in the primary and bottling a week later.

Thoughts? I’m sure it won’t be ruined, but will a 2 month primary cause issues (other than diminished hop flavor)?

Either way no biggie…I’ll just RDWHAHB!

You are fine. I have done 6-8 week primaries plenty. and really the beer just comes out better in my opinion.

I think the longest I’ve ever gone is 90 days primary with no issues and great beer. This might be an opportuniy for you to dry out no secondary at all, just add a muslin bag of dry hops to your primary fermenter for 6-10 days. I think you will be pleased with the results.

+1.
I’ve also done 3 month primaries and never had problems. Beers turn out great.

I humbly disagee with some of the above. I have had problems with leaving my beers on the cake for that long. It seems to result in “that homebrew taste” we all want to avoid. It’s hard to put my finger on it, but it’s happened with more than one batch, and my fermentorium is a very constant temp and pitch dark.

After 5-7 days I take a reading. If the beer is done, it’s done. A lot of the time I rack to secondary to help age the beer (no matter what the OG is) and let anything else drop out of suspension. If I were you, I’d throw that puppy in secondary for a couple weeks, it may help mellow any off flavors.

But… before you take any advice, take a sample and taste it. If it’s good, proceed however you see fit!

:cheers:

[quote=“Jonny”]I humbly disagee with some of the above. I have had problems with leaving my beers on the cake for that long. It seems to result in “that homebrew taste” we all want to avoid. It’s hard to put my finger on it, but it’s happened with more than one batch, and my fermentorium is a very constant temp and pitch dark.

After 5-7 days I take a reading. If the beer is done, it’s done. A lot of the time I rack to secondary to help age the beer (no matter what the OG is) and let anything else drop out of suspension. If I were you, I’d throw that puppy in secondary for a couple weeks, it may help mellow any off flavors.

But… before you take any advice, take a sample and taste it. If it’s good, proceed however you see fit!

:cheers: [/quote]

are you sure its the length of time on the yeast that is causing your ‘homebrew’ taste?

there is a lot of decent research out there (and a host of award winning brewers) that contradicts what you say is the only reason i ask.

[quote=“Pietro”][quote=“Jonny”]I humbly disagee with some of the above. I have had problems with leaving my beers on the cake for that long. It seems to result in “that homebrew taste” we all want to avoid. It’s hard to put my finger on it, but it’s happened with more than one batch, and my fermentorium is a very constant temp and pitch dark.

After 5-7 days I take a reading. If the beer is done, it’s done. A lot of the time I rack to secondary to help age the beer (no matter what the OG is) and let anything else drop out of suspension. If I were you, I’d throw that puppy in secondary for a couple weeks, it may help mellow any off flavors.

But… before you take any advice, take a sample and taste it. If it’s good, proceed however you see fit!

:cheers: [/quote]

are you sure its the length of time on the yeast that is causing your ‘homebrew’ taste?

there is a lot of decent research out there (and a host of award winning brewers) that contradicts what you say is the only reason i ask.[/quote]

I suppose I could be wrong, but the only batches I’ve had gone south in that way are the ones I left on he cake for a long time. I’ve even had some of the employees at NB agree with me on this. But I guess there isn’t any way to know for sure…

Maybe there is a sanitation issue?

I have fermented and cold crashed a lager and let it sit on the trub for 6 months at 35f and the beer was fine. I amagine it was the cold temps that worked in my favor though.

You’ll be fine, don’t worry about it. I do this sort of thing all the time.

Are you fermenting in plastic or glass? If its plastic then the longer it sits the more likely that oxygen will permeate.

Really the only problem I’d see is that sanitation problems could be a little magnified.

Some of my longest fermenting beers like a saison I made with Wyeast Belgian Saison at a fermentation temp of ~78 and an old ale at ~65 degrees with 1968 took about 3 months a piece. They were by far my best beers.

Has anyone experimented with the same batch, same yeast, same conditions, but allowing one to ferment longer? I’d like to think it might dry out a little or perhaps taste more yeasty. Thoughts?

[quote=“s2y”]

Has anyone experimented with the same batch, same yeast, same conditions, but allowing one to ferment longer? I’d like to think it might dry out a little or perhaps taste more yeasty. Thoughts?[/quote]

+1, big time.

the most recent wisdom is that you are far better off leaving beers on too long than taking them off yeast too early. Have had IPAs on the yeast for 2-3 months, and had a great clean ferment.